Cable Combat
Combate del cable

  • English
  • Español

Cable Combat

Union digs in with worker strike

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

The strike of union cable workers against Charter Communications is in its 15th month.

The strike of union cable workers against Charter 
Communications is in its 15th month.

No end in sight.

Now in its 15th month, the strike of union cable workers against Charter Communications persists.
About 1,800 members of Local Union 3, of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW), most of them field technicians who service cable, internet and phone service, walked off the job in March 2017 after workers said the company attempted to stop contributions into worker pension and medical plans, and to take away certain paid holidays and personal time off.

On June 25, union representatives and City Councilmembers held a press conference at City Hall to criticize Charter, which merged with Time Warner Cable last year and is known to customers as Spectrum. They accused the company of prolonging the strike by refusing to negotiate in good faith, insisting there had been no meaningful negotiations since December.

“They want to come in and undermine fair pensions, fair wages and benefits,” said Councilmember I. Daneek Miller, Chair of the Council’s Committee on Civil Service and Labor. “New York is simply a union town, and we defend middle class working families.”

“There is a human face to the suffering,” said Central Labor Council’s Vincent Álvarez.

“There is a human face to the suffering,” said
Central Labor Council’s Vincent Álvarez.

Before being elected, Miller was a union leader, the President of the Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) Local 1056, where he advocated for transportation workers.

“What’s at stake here is the lives and welfare of 1,800 men and women, but also the status of New York City as a town that supports and respects organized labor,” added Councilmember Rory Lancman.

Vincent Álvarez of the New York City Central Labor Council remarked that the striking workers had taken “a very courageous position” by staying out on strike for 15 months despite economic hardships for their families.

“These are people, these are our family members, these are people in our communities, and we need to always remember that there is a human face to the suffering which Charter-Spectrum has brought down on these workers,” he said.

Public Advocate Letitia James called striking workers “the heart and soul of the working class,” and said they helped bolster Spectrum’s growth as a company.

“At a time when [Spectrum is] recognizing and seeing record levels of profits, it’s really critically important that they share the wealth with these men and women of labor.”

Chris Erikson, Business Manager of IBEW Local 3, said that prior to the merger with Charter, the union had a good relationship with Time Warner, remarking that the company “respected its workforce and negotiated collective bargaining agreements for 40 years.”

Under Time Warner, union members were allowed to set aside money to pay for defined benefit pension and for retirement medical coverage, Erikson said.

“Now a new company comes in, and they don’t care what they do to you,” he remarked.

“We defend middle class working families,” said Councilmember I. Daneek Miller.

“We defend middle class working families,” said
Councilmember I. Daneek Miller.

Speakers pointed to numerous issues New York State has experienced with Charter, including a lawsuit from then-Attorney General Eric Schniederman, alleging the company defrauded thousands of customers by promising internet speeds it knew it could not deliver to sites all over the state.

Charter’s motion to dismiss the lawsuit was rejected Thursday on June 21 by the state Appellate Division of the Supreme Court.

In addition, on June 14, the state’s Public Service Commission (PSC) ordered Charter to pay $2 million to the state treasury, after the company failed to meet its obligations to expand its network of cable, high-speed broadband and telephone services.

The PSC approved Charter’s merger with Time Warner Cable in January 2016.

On June 26, the PSC issued a letter to Charter CEO Thomas Rutledge, accusing the company of “false advertising and misleading of New York consumers” regarding expansion of its broadband network. It said that Spectrum’s assertions in advertisements that it has complied with requirements are “demonstrably and materially false.”

Workers rallied at City Hall.

Workers rallied at City Hall.

“Not only has the company failed to meet its obligations to build out its cable system as required, it is now making patently false and misleading claims to consumers that it has met those obligations without in any way acknowledging the findings of the Public Service Commission to the contrary,” the letter said. “Access to broadband is essential for economic development and social equity. Charter/Spectrum’s intentional deception of New Yorkers must end now.”

Charter has maintained that it is indeed meeting its buildout obligations.

“The fact is that Spectrum has built out our broadband network to more than 42,000 unserved or underserved homes since the merger,” said Charter spokesperson Andrew Russell in a statement. “We find it baffling that the PSC thinks that some New Yorkers count and others don’t, given their belief that access to broadband is essential for economic development and social equity.”
Erikson said that Charter agreed not to replace the customer-facing workforce as part of the merger agreement.

“When they forced this strike, that certainly put a whole new face of scabs and strike-breakers onto the job,” Erikson said. “They have violated, we believe, the merger agreement and the Governor and PSC will continue to hold them accountable.”

"We're willing to return to negotiate in good faith,” said Charter Vice President Camille Joseph Goldman.

“We’re willing to return to negotiate in good
faith,” said Charter Vice President Camille
Joseph Goldman.

Miller said the Council would need to reevaluate Charter’s franchise agreement with the city, in the wake of the strike and issues with the PSC and Attorney General.

“When we look at [renewing] the franchise agreement, all of the things that occurred over the past few years will be taken into account,” he stated.

The press conference was held immediately prior to a Council hearing for the Committee of Zoning and Franchises, where Councilmembers grilled Charter representatives about the company’s practices and negotiations with workers, and union members testified about the strike.

City Councilmember Francisco Moya questioned how Charter could claim it was providing adequate services in light of legal actions by the Attorney General and PSC.

Camille Joseph Goldman, Charter’s Vice President for Government Affairs in the Northeast Region, defended her company, pointing out the Attorney General’s lawsuit involved actions prior to the merger with Time Warner Cable.

“New York City [is] a town that supports and respects organized labor,” said Councilmember Rory Lancman.

“New York City [is] a town that supports and
respects organized labor,” said Councilmember
Rory Lancman.

“That litigation commenced in 2013, before our merger. Rest assured that since then, we’ve invested in our network,” she said.

Regarding the PSC’s fine for buildout requirements Goldman remarked, “We don’t agree with what the PSC is alleging.”

Goldman pointed out the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) ruled last November that Charter was negotiating in good faith with IBEW, and told Councilmembers it was against federal law for local government to use their franchising authority to pressure companies to accept outcomes at the bargaining table.

She said the company was asking workers to give up their pensions because the company was offering a different package, but did not release details of the offer, saying she was unable to discussion matters intended for the bargaining table.

“We’re willing to return to the bargaining table at any time and negotiate in good faith,” she said.
Troy Walcott, an IBEW member, said that the new benefits plan and healthcare package being offered by Charter would make things more difficult for his family.

Public Advocate Letitia James called striking workers “the heart and soul of the working class.”

Public Advocate Letitia James called striking
workers “the heart and soul of the working class.”

“I never thought I’d see an outside company come into New York City and push around its people, workforce, elected officials and then dare them to do something about it,” Walcott remarked.

Union member Derek Jordan said the company was downgrading its health plan, and accused Charter of attempting to decertify Local 3 as bargaining agent for its workforce.

“[They are] not the type of entity that the progressive New York City should want to do business with,” he said.

Combate del cable

No se cede en huelga de trabajadores

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

"Han violado el acuerdo de fusión", dijo Chris Erikson, gerente comercial de IBEW Local 3.

“Han violado el acuerdo de fusión”, dijo Chris
Erikson, gerente comercial de IBEW Local 3.

Sin final a la vista.

Ahora en su décimo quinto mes, la huelga del sindicato de trabajadores del cable contra Charter Communications, persiste.

Alrededor de 1,800 miembros de Local Union 3, de la Hermandad Internacional de Trabajadores Eléctricos (IBEW, por sus siglas en inglés), la mayoría de ellos técnicos de campo que prestan servicios de cable, internet y telefonía, abandonaron el trabajo en marzo de 2017 después de que los trabajadores dijeran que la empresa intentaba detener las contribuciones a las pensiones de los trabajadores y planes médicos, y quitarles ciertos feriados pagados y tiempo libre personal.

El 25 de junio, representantes sindicales y miembros del Concejo Municipal celebraron una conferencia de prensa en el Ayuntamiento para criticar a Charter, que se fusionó con Time Warner Cable el año pasado y sus clientes lo conocen como Spectrum. Acusaron a la compañía de prolongar la huelga al negarse a negociar de buena fe, insistiendo en que no han tenido negociaciones significativas desde diciembre.

“Quieren entrar y socavar las pensiones justas, los salarios justos y las prestaciones”, dijo el conejal I. Daneek Miller, presidente de la Comisión de Servicio Civil y Trabajo del Concejo. “Nueva York es simplemente una ciudad sindical y defendemos a las familias trabajadoras de clase media”.

La mayoría de los trabajadores afectados son técnicos de campo que brindan servicio de cable, internet y telefonía.

La mayoría de los trabajadores afectados son
técnicos de campo que brindan servicio de
cable, internet y telefonía.

Antes de ser elegido, Miller se desempeñó como líder sindical, fue el presidente del Sindicato Amalgamado de Transporte Público (ATU, por sus siglas en inglés) Local 1056, donde abogó por los trabajadores del transporte.

“Lo que está en juego aquí es la vida y el bienestar de 1,800 hombres y mujeres, pero también el estatus de Nueva York como una ciudad que apoya y respeta a la mano de obra organizada”, agregó el concejal Rory Lancman.

Vincent Álvarez, del Consejo Laboral Central de la ciudad de Nueva York, señaló que los trabajadores en huelga habían adoptado “una posición muy valiente” al permanecer en huelga durante 15 meses a pesar de las dificultades económicas para sus familias.

“Estas son personas, son miembros de nuestra familia,  son personas en nuestras comunidades, y debemos recordar siempre que hay un rostro humano en el sufrimiento que Charter-Spectrum ha infligido a estos trabajadores”, señaló.

La defensora pública Letitia James llamó a los trabajadores en huelga “el corazón y el alma de la clase trabajadora” y dijo que ayudaron a impulsar el crecimiento de Spectrum como empresa.

La huelga de los trabajadores de cable del sindicato contra Charter Communications está en su décimo quinto mes.

La huelga de los trabajadores de cable del
sindicato contra Charter Communications está
en su décimo quinto mes.

“En un momento en que [Spectrum] reconoce y ve niveles récord de ganancias, es sumamente importante que compartan la riqueza con estos hombres y mujeres de trabajo”.

Chris Erikson, gerente comercial de IBEW Local 3, dijo que antes de la fusión con Charter, el sindicato tenía una buena relación con Time Warner, y señaló que la compañía “respetó a su fuerza de trabajo y negoció acuerdos colectivos durante 40 años”.

Bajo Time Warner, a los miembros del sindicato se les permitía ahorrar dinero para pagar la prestación definida de pensión y cobertura médica para la jubilación, dijo Erikson.

“Ahora entra una nueva compañía y no les importa lo que te hagan”, comentó.

Los oradores señalaron numerosos problemas que el estado de Nueva York ha experimentado con Charter, incluida una demanda del entonces fiscal general Eric Schniederman, alegando que la compañía defraudó a miles de clientes prometiendo velocidades de Internet que sabía que no podría entregar en sitios en todo el estado.

"Hay un rostro humano para el sufrimiento", dijo Vincent Álvarez, del Consejo Central del Trabajo.

“Hay un rostro humano para el sufrimiento”, dijo
Vincent Álvarez, del Consejo Central del Trabajo.

La moción de Charter para desestimar la demanda fue rechazada el jueves 21 de junio por la división de apelaciones de la Corte Suprema del estado.

Además, el 14 de junio, la Comisión Estatal de Servicio Público (PSC, por sus siglas en inglés) ordenó a Charter pagar $2 millones de dólares a la hacienda pública luego de que la compañía no cumpliera con sus obligaciones de ampliar su red de cable, banda ancha de alta velocidad y servicios telefónicos.

La PSC aprobó la fusión de Charter con Time Warner Cable en enero de 2016.

El 26 de junio, la PSC emitió una carta al director general de Charter, Thomas Rutledge, acusando a la compañía de “publicidad falsa y engañosa dirigida a los consumidores de Nueva York” con respecto a la expansión de su red de banda ancha. Dijo que las afirmaciones de Spectrum en los anuncios de que ha cumplido con los requisitos son “demostrables y materialmente falsas”.

“La compañía no solo no ha cumplido con sus obligaciones de construir su sistema de cable como se exigió, sino que ahora hace afirmaciones claramente falsas y engañosas a los consumidores de que ha cumplido con esas obligaciones sin reconocer de ninguna manera los hallazgos de la Comisión de Servicio Público dicen lo contrario”, señala la carta. “El acceso a la banda ancha es esencial para el desarrollo económico y la equidad social. El engaño intencional de Charter/Spectrum a los neoyorquinos debe terminar ahora”.

Charter ha mantenido que de hecho cumple con sus obligaciones de desarrollo.

“El hecho es que Spectrum ha construido una red de banda ancha en más de 42,000 hogares desatendidos o sub atendidos desde la fusión”, dijo el portavoz de Charter, Andrew Russell, en un comunicado. “Nos resulta desconcertante que la PSC piense que algunos neoyorquinos cuentan y otros no, dado su convencimiento de que el acceso a la banda ancha es esencial para el desarrollo económico y la equidad social”.

"Defendemos a las familias trabajadoras de clase media", dijo el concejal I. Daneek Miller.

“Defendemos a las familias trabajadoras de
clase media”, dijo el concejal I. Daneek Miller.

Erikson señaló que Charter acordó no reemplazar a la fuerza de trabajo con trato directo con al cliente como parte del acuerdo de fusión.

“Cuando forzaron esta huelga, eso ciertamente le dio una nueva cara a los esquiroles y rompehuelgas en el trabajo”, dijo Erikson. “Han violado, creemos, el acuerdo de fusión y el gobernador y la PSC continuarán haciéndolos responsables”.

Miller dijo que el Concejo necesitaría reevaluar el acuerdo de franquicia de Charter con la ciudad tras la huelga y los problemas con la PSC y el fiscal general.

“Cuando estudiemos [renovar] el acuerdo de franquicia, todas las cosas que ocurrieron en los últimos años se tendrán en cuenta”, afirmó.

La conferencia de prensa se llevó a cabo inmediatamente antes de una audiencia del Concejo del Comité Zonificación y Franquicias, en la que concejales interrogaron a los representantes de Charter sobre las prácticas y negociaciones de la compañía con los trabajadores, y los miembros del sindicato testificaron sobre la huelga.

Los trabajadores se manifestaron en el Ayuntamiento.

Los trabajadores se manifestaron en el Ayuntamiento.

El concejal Francisco Moya cuestionó cómo Charter podía asegurar que brinda servicios adecuados a la luz de las acciones legales del fiscal general y la PSC.

Camille Joseph Goldman, vicepresidenta de Asuntos Gubernamentales de Charter en la región noreste, defendió a su compañía señalando que la demanda del fiscal general involucró acciones previas a la fusión con Time Warner Cable.

“Ese litigio comenzó en 2013, antes de nuestra fusión. Tengan la seguridad de que, desde entonces, hemos invertido en nuestra red”, dijo.

Con respecto a la multa de la PSC por los requisitos de desarrollo, Goldman comentó: “No estamos de acuerdo con lo que afirma la PSC”.

Goldman señaló que la Junta Nacional de Relaciones Laborales (NLRB, por sus siglas en inglés) dictaminó en noviembre pasado que Charter estaba negociando de buena fe con IBEW, y les dijo a los concejales que era ilegal que el gobierno local usara su autoridad de franquicia para presionar a las compañías a aceptar resultados en la mesa de negociación.

"Estamos dispuestos a volver a negociar de buena fe", dijo la vicepresidenta de Charter, Camille Joseph Goldman.

“Estamos dispuestos a volver a negociar de
buena fe”, dijo la vicepresidenta de Charter,
Camille Joseph Goldman.

Dijo que la compañía pide a los trabajadores que renuncien a sus pensiones porque les ofrece un paquete diferente, pero no dio a conocer detalles de la oferta explicando que no puede debatir asuntos destinados a la mesa de negociaciones.
“Estamos dispuestos a regresar a la mesa de negociaciones en cualquier momento y negociar de buena fe”, dijo.

Troy Walcott, miembro de IBEW, dijo que el nuevo plan de prestaciones y el paquete de atención médica que ofrece Charter harían más difíciles las cosas para su familia.

“Nunca pensé que vería venir a una compañía externa a la ciudad de Nueva York y presionar a su gente, su fuerza de trabajo, a sus funcionarios electos, y luego desafiarlos a hacer algo al respecto”, comentó Walcott.

Derek Jordan, miembro del sindicato, dijo que la compañía está degradando su plan de salud y acusó a Charter de intentar descertificar al Local 3 como agente de negociación para su fuerza de trabajo.

“[No] son el tipo de entidad con la que la progresiva ciudad de Nueva York debería querer hacer negocios”, dijo.