“I went many days without eating”
“Estuve muchos días sin comer”

  • English
  • Español

“I went many days without eating”

Tipped workers urge change in wage laws

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

María, a nail salon worker, spoke of earning about $25 a day in pay.

María, a nail salon worker, spoke of earning
about $25 a day in pay.

A decade of work.

For ten years, Bronx resident Sonia Morales has worked in New York nail salons, often logging more than 40 hours a work week.

“I still make only $90 a day for a 10-hour day, working over 40 hours a week,” explained the Bronx resident, who says things must change for fellow nail technicians and other tipped workers in the state.

“The current tip-based pay system results in an unlivable wage and unjust treatment,” she argued.

Morales is a member of the New York Nail Salon Workers Association of Workers United, and was one of scores of fellow nail salon employees and car wash workers, along with worker rights advocates, who filled the gym at Hostos Community College on Tues., Jun. 19th for the first New York City hearing to examine the subminimum wage for tipped workers.

Hosted by the New York State Department of Labor (DOL), the hearing was the sixth held in the state, to focus on bringing pay for tipped workers in line with the state’s general minimum wage.
A DOL panel that included Commissioner Roberta Reardon listened to the public testimony.

Workers and advocates have rallied for change in wage laws. Photo: MRNY | Twitter

Workers and advocates have rallied for change
in wage laws.
Photo: MRNY | Twitter

Dozens of workers from the car wash and nail salon industries testified that their lives are negatively impacted by low pay, grueling hours and even wage theft. Many stressed the need for the same fair minimum wage as non-tipped workers because they cannot rely on tips to make a living.

“I’ll give a customer a pedicure for 40 minutes to an hour. They’ll give me a few dollars in tips if at all,” stated Paulina, a nail salon worker. “We need a minimum wage because I cannot live on a few dollars.”

Car wash employee Mamadou Drame said he routinely worked 60 hours a week, yet sometimes took home only a few hundred dollars in pay.

“I went many days without eating,” Drame remarked. “On a good day, I make $50 in tips, but many days I make nothing.”

A panel that included Commissioner Roberta Reardon listened to the public testimony.

A panel that included Commissioner Roberta
Reardon listened to the public testimony.

He said his manager would sometimes call him on his only day off and ask him to come to work.

“If you say no, they can fire you, or take away your shift for the following week,” Drame said.

In New York, tipped workers make a subminimum wage ranging from $7.50 to $8.65, relying on tips to bring them up to the state’s general minimum wage, which ranges from $10.40 to $13.00, depending on the region.

Seven states – Alaska, California, Washington, Oregon, Minnesota, Montana, and Nevada – already ensure that tipped workers are paid a basic minimum wage in addition to their tips. Advocates have indicated that the time is right for New York to be next, as the state has already established a $15 minimum wage for non-tipped employees.

Cuomo, in his most recent State of the State address, advocated for “one fair wage.”

“New York continues to be a national leader in fighting for justice for working men and women, and by providing a platform for New Yorkers’ concerns to be heard, we are furthering our efforts to deliver fair wages for all. I am urging those impacted by this proposal to register, attend a hearing, and help us move this state one step closer toward a better, more just New York,” he said.

Cuomo’s proposal would not eliminate tipping, only the subminimum wage.

At the hearing, advocates insisted that the subminimum wage hurt immigrant New Yorkers.

“Low-wage workers with limited English proficiency are particularly vulnerable to being taken advantage of,” Amanda Bransford, a staff attorney at Make the Road New York (MRNY). She said that if tipped workers fail to make the state minimum wage amount through their tips, New York employers are required to pay them the difference to ensure the minimum wage is met.

Simón Salvador has worked in the car wash industry for more than 20 years.

Simón Salvador has worked in the car wash
industry for more than 20 years.

“The law relies on employers to do the right thing in following the law, but unfortunately as our clients know too well, it is rarely the case,” she said.

“Workers need your help,” Drame appealed to the DOL panel. “They need you to stand up for what is right.”

The DOL is still accepting written testimony until July 1 at hearing@labor.ny.gov.

“Governor Cuomo has directed this agency to ensure that no workers are more susceptible to exploitation because they rely on tips to survive,” remarked Reardon, who said the DOL had already heard 25 hours of testimony prior to the June 19 hearing.

“These workers struggle every day,” said Deborah Axt, MRNY Co-Executive Director.

“These workers struggle
every day,” said
Deborah Axt, MRNY
Co-Executive Director.

“We understand these issues are highly complex, and that we are talking about potentially changing rules that have been in place for decades,” Reardon said.

 

María, a nail salon worker from Queens, said when she first began working in salons, she took home about $25 a day in pay. She explained that she is often forced to work long hours with no lunch break and no set end time.

“When it’s really busy, if customers keep coming in, they don’t care about when you have to leave,” she said, adding that the extra hours keep her away from her two young children.

“I have two options – basically, work to support my kids, or spend time with them,” she stated.
Deborah Axt, MRNY Co-Executive Director, said she has interviewed hundreds of car wash workers over the years.

“I can personally attest to the fact that the subminimum tip wage, and the complexity of the tip credit system, makes it virtually impossible for car wash workers and others to even identify whether they are making the legal minimum wage,” Axt said.

She noted a 2008 New York State DOL study that found that four out of every five car washes in New York City were stealing their workers’ wages.

“The subminimum tipped wage makes wage theft almost impossible to eradicate in the industries that employ many of our state’s most vulnerable workers,” Axt stated. “These workers struggle every day, and in these industries customers often have no idea that their generosity is absolutely required just to get the worker serving them the bare minimum wage.”

Signage at the panel.

Signage at the panel.

Simón Salvador has worked in the car wash industry for more than 20 years. He said he helps support family members back home in Mexico, but for a long time, found it difficult to do so, as an employer was stealing some of his hard-earned cash.

 

“From 2003 to 2009, workers at my car wash had their wages stolen,” he said.

He said that he and other workers at his current car wash in East New York negotiated a contract with the employer that eliminates the tip credit system and pays them a higher base pay in return.

“I once worked 60 to 70 hours a week for about $8.75 an hour. Now I’m making full minimum wage, plus tips, and can make more money even though I work fewer hours,” said Salvador, who currently has a base pay of $13 an hour, and works closer to 50 hours a week.

Salvador acknowledged that his pay situation is better than many other car wash workers have, and said he attended the hearing out of solidarity to them.

“It’s very important to show support for other workers, because I’ve been in their shoes in the past,” he stated. “I understand their struggles and how hard it is to make a good wage.”

Written testimony can be submitted to the Department of Labor at hearing@labor.ny.gov. It must be sent in before July 1, 2018.

For more information, please visit https://on.ny.gov/2IyvOXz.

“Estuve muchos días sin comer”

Trabajadores urgen un cambio en las leyes de salario

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

Paulina testificó: "Necesitamos un salario mínimo porque no puedo vivir con unos pocos dólares".

Paulina testificó: “Necesitamos un salario mínimo
porque no puedo vivir con unos pocos dólares”.

Una década de trabajo.

Durante diez años, la residente del Bronx Sonia Morales ha trabajado en salones de manicura de Nueva York, a menudo registrando más de 40 horas semanales de trabajo.

“Sigo ganando solo $90 dólares al día por un día de 10 horas, trabajando más de 40 horas a la semana”, explicó la residente del Bronx, quien dice que las cosas deben cambiar para los demás técnicos en uñas y otros trabajadores que reciben propinas en el estado.

“El actual sistema de pago basado en propinas da como resultado un salario insostenible y un trato injusto”, argumentó.

Morales es miembro de la Asociación de Trabajadores de Salones de Uñas de Trabajadores Unidos de Nueva York y fue una de los muchos empleados de salones de uñas y de lavado de autos, junto con defensores de los derechos de los trabajadores, que llenaron el gimnasio en Hostos Community College el martes 19 de junio en la primera audiencia de la ciudad de Nueva York para examinar el salario sub mínimo para los trabajadores con propinas.

La discusión se llevó a cabo en Hostos Community College.

La discusión se llevó a cabo en Hostos
Community College.

Organizado por el Departamento de Trabajo del Estado de Nueva York (DOL, por sus siglas en inglés), la audiencia fue la sexta celebrada en el estado, enfocada en hacer que el pago para los trabajadores con propinas esté en línea con el salario mínimo general del estado.

Un panel del DOL que incluyó a la comisionada Roberta Reardon escuchó el testimonio del público.

Docenas de trabajadores de las industrias del lavado de autos y los salones de belleza testificaron que sus vidas son negativamente afectadas por el bajo salario, las horas extenuantes e incluso el robo de salarios. Muchos enfatizaron la necesidad del mismo salario mínimo justo, ya que los trabajadores sin propinas no pueden depender de las propinas para ganarse la vida.

“Le daré una pedicura a un cliente por 40 minutos a una hora. Me dará algunos dólares en propina, si es que lo hace”, dijo Paulina, una trabajadora de salón de uñas. “Necesitamos un salario mínimo porque no puedo vivir con unos pocos dólares”.

El empleado de lavado de autos Mamadou Drame dijo que rutinariamente trabaja 60 horas a la semana, aunque a veces se lleva a casa solo unos pocos cientos de dólares como pago.
“Pasé muchos días sin comer”, comentó Drame. “En un buen día, gano $50 dólares en propinas, pero muchos días no gano nada”.

María, una trabajadora de salón de uñas, habló de ganar alrededor de $25 dólares por día como pago.

María, una trabajadora de salón de uñas, habló de
ganar alrededor de $25 dólares por día como pago.

Dijo que su gerente a veces lo llama en su único día libre y le pide que vaya a trabajar.

“Si dices que no, pueden despedirte o quitarte tu turno la semana siguiente”, dijo Drame.

En Nueva York, los trabajadores que reciben propinas ganan un salario mínimo de entre $7.50 y $8.65 dólares, dependiendo de las propinas para llevarlos al salario mínimo general del estado, que varía de $10.40 a $13.00 dólares, dependiendo de la región.

Siete estados, Alaska, California, Washington, Oregón, Minnesota, Montana y Nevada, ya se aseguran de que a los trabajadores que reciben propinas se les pague un salario mínimo básico además de sus propinas. Los defensores han indicado que es el momento adecuado para que Nueva York sea el próximo, ya que el estado ya estableció un salario mínimo de $15 dólares para los empleados que no reciben propinas.

Cuomo, en su discurso más reciente sobre el estado del Estado, abogó por “un salario justo”.

Trabajadores y defensores se han manifestado para cambiar las leyes salariales. Foto: MRNY | Twitter

Trabajadores y defensores se han manifestado
para cambiar las leyes salariales.
Foto: MRNY | Twitter

“Nueva York sigue siendo un líder nacional en la lucha por la justicia para hombres y mujeres que trabajan, y al proporcionar una plataforma para que las inquietudes de los neoyorquinos se escuchen, estamos fomentando nuestros esfuerzos para ofrecer salarios justos para todos. Insto a quienes son impactados con esta propuesta a inscribirse, asistir a una audiencia y ayudarnos a acercar este estado un paso hacia un Nueva York mejor y más justo”, dijo.

La propuesta de Cuomo no eliminaría las propinas, solo el salario sub mínimo.

En la audiencia, los defensores insistieron en que el salario sub mínimo perjudica a los inmigrantes neoyorquinos.

“Los trabajadores de bajos salarios con dominio limitado del inglés son particularmente vulnerables a ser abusados”, dijo Amanda Bransford, abogada de Make the Road Nueva York (MRNY). Dijo que, si los trabajadores que reciben propinas no logran completar el salario mínimo estatal a través de sus propinas, los empleadores de Nueva York deben pagarles la diferencia para garantizar que alcancen el salario mínimo.

Un panel que incluyó a la comisionada Roberta Reardon escuchó el testimonio del público.

Un panel que incluyó a la comisionada Roberta
Reardon escuchó el testimonio del público.

“La ley depende de que los empleadores hagan lo correcto al seguir la ley, pero desafortunadamente, como nuestros clientes saben muy bien, rara vez es el caso”, dijo.

“Los trabajadores necesitan su ayuda”, Drame apeló al panel del DOL. “Necesitan que defiendan lo que es correcto”.

El DOL todavía está aceptando testimonios escritos hasta el 1 de julio en hearing@labor.ny.gov.

“El gobernador Cuomo ha ordenado a esta agencia asegurarse de que ningún trabajador sea más susceptible a la explotación porque depende de propinas para sobrevivir”, comentó Reardon, quien dijo que el DOL ya había escuchado 25 horas de testimonio antes de la audiencia del 19 de junio.

“Entendemos que estos problemas son muy complejos y que estamos hablando de reglas potencialmente cambiantes que han estado vigentes por décadas”, dijo Reardon.

María, una trabajadora de salón de belleza de Queens, dijo que cuando comenzó a trabajar en los salones, se llevaba a casa unos $25 dólares como salario por un día de trabajo. Explicó que a menudo se ve obligada a trabajar largas horas sin descanso para almorzar y sin tiempo fijo establecido.

“Cuando está realmente ocupado, si los clientes siguen llegando, no les importa cuándo tienes que irte”, dijo, y agregó que las horas extra la mantienen alejada de sus dos hijos pequeños.
“Tengo dos opciones: básicamente, trabajar para mantener a mis hijos o pasar tiempo con ellos”, afirmó.

Deborah Axt, directora ejecutiva de MRNY, dijo que ha entrevistado a cientos de trabajadores de lavado de autos a lo largo de los años.

“Personalmente puedo dar fe del hecho de que el salario sub mínimo por propina y la complejidad del sistema de crédito de propinas hace virtualmente imposible que los trabajadores de lavado de autos y otros identifiquen si están ganando el salario mínimo legal”, dijo Axt.

Observó un estudio del DOL del estado de Nueva York en 2008 que descubrió que cuatro de cada cinco lavados de autos en la ciudad de Nueva York estaban robando los salarios de sus trabajadores.

Simón Salvador ha trabajado en la industria del lavado de autos por más de 20 años.

Simón Salvador ha trabajado en la industria del
lavado de autos por más de 20 años.

“El salario sub mínimo de propina hace que el robo de salarios sea casi imposible de erradicar en las industrias que emplean a muchos de los trabajadores más vulnerables de nuestro estado”, afirmó Axt. “Estos trabajadores luchan todos los días y en estas industrias, los clientes a menudo no tienen idea de que su generosidad es absolutamente necesaria tan solo para que el trabajador obtenga el salario mínimo brindándoles un servicio”.

Simón Salvador ha trabajado en la industria del lavado de autos por más de 20 años. Dijo que ayuda a mantener a los miembros de la familia en México, pero por mucho tiempo, le resultó difícil hacerlo, ya que un empleador le robaba parte de su efectivo ganado con tanto esfuerzo.

“De 2003 a 2009, a los trabajadores de mi lavado de autos nos robaban nuestros salarios”, dijo.

"Estos trabajadores luchan todos los días", dijo Deborah Axt, codirectora ejecutiva de MRNY.

“Estos trabajadores luchan
todos los días”, dijo
Deborah Axt, codirectora
ejecutiva de MRNY.

Explicó que los trabajadores en su actual lavado de autos en el este de Nueva York negociaron un contrato con el empleador que elimina el sistema de crédito de propinas y les paga un salario base más alto a cambio.

“Alguna vez trabajé de 60 a 70 horas a la semana por alrededor de $8.75 dólares por hora. Ahora estoy ganando el salario mínimo completo, más propinas, y puedo ganar más dinero a pesar de que trabajo menos horas”, dijo Salvador, quien actualmente tiene un salario base de $13 dólares por hora, y trabaja más cerca de 50 horas a la semana.

Salvador reconoció que su situación salarial es mejor que la de muchos otros trabajadores de lavado de autos, y dijo que asistió a la audiencia por solidaridad.

“Es muy importante mostrar apoyo a otros trabajadores, porque he estado en sus zapatos en el pasado”, afirmó. “Entiendo sus luchas y lo difícil que es ganar un buen salario”.

Testimonios por escrito se puede enviar al Departamento de Trabajo al correo electrónico hearing@labor.ny.gov. Debe ser enviado antes del 1º de julio de 2018.

Para obtener más información, por favor visite https://on.ny.gov/2IyvOXz.