Screenings con sazón
Proyecciones con sazón

  • English
  • Español

Screenings con sazón

Story by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer and Erik Cuello

"We have it all – features, shorts, narratives and documentaries,” explains Verónica Caicedo, Director and CEO of Third Annual International Puerto Rican Heritage Film Festival.

“We have it all – features, shorts, narratives and documentaries,” explains Verónica Caicedo, Director and CEO of Third Annual International Puerto Rican Heritage Film Festival.

If you’re looking for film with flavor, you’re in luck this week.

The Third Annual International Puerto Rican Heritage Film Festival (IPRHFF) kicks off this Wed., Nov. 13th. Sponsors include Telemundo 47, NBC-TV, Mount SinaiMedicalCenter, MIST Harlem, New York Academy of Medicine, and Chivas.

It runs through Sun., Nov. 17th and includes films that focus on the lives of families in the Bronx and Northern Manhattan.

Thousands of people are expected to attend the festival, which highlights as diverse a representation of Puerto Rican heritage as it features various media – all in what many consider the very mecca of the Puerto Rican experience in New York: El Barrio.

“I felt that El Barrio was missing something other than what is there now,” explained Verónica Caicedo, IPRHFF’s Director and CEO.

“We have it all – features, shorts, narratives and documentaries.”

This year, the festival features film and television actress Lauren Vélez, recently featured in the acclaimed Showtime drama series Dexter, as its official spokesperson. Vélez, who grew up in New York City’s RockawayBeach, will spearhead the festival’s efforts to donate a portion of this year’s proceeds to the relief efforts.

Caicedo is clear about what is required in producing the festival.

Television and film actress Lauren Vélez serves as the festival’s official spokesperson.

Television and film actress Lauren Vélez serves as the festival’s official spokesperson.

“Determination and commitment,” said Caicedo. “Plus, a great support system.”

“We have gone from one day to 5, and from 15 movies to over 50 in just our third year,” added Ernesto Malavé Jr., IPRHFF’s Director of New Media and Public Relations.

“Beyond the logistics, what really goes into this event is a tremendous amount of passion.”

The film festival will be hosted in large part at Mount Sinai Medical Center.

It will not be the first cinematic endeavor for the hospital, which has also hosted the New York International Latino Film Festival in recent years.

“It got around that we do this and we were contacted by the film festival,” recalled Zoraya Nazario, Community Liaison for Mount Sinai’s Department of Communication and Government Affairs. “It was through the grapevine.”

Among the films to be screened at the festival is Macdara Vallely’s Babygirl, the second movie for the Irish director, who also wrote the script.

The movie’s protagonist, Lena (portrayed by actress Yainis Ynoa), is at the center of a love triangle of sorts that involves her mother, Lucy (Rosa Arrendondo), and her mother’s younger boyfriend, Victor (Flaco Navaja), who seems more interested in Lena than in her mother. Lena hopes to expose Victor’s true feelings to her mother, but the task becomes more complicated than she expected.

“It was a challenge to make sure all the details were in place,” says filmmaker Macdara Vallely of Babygirl.

“It was a challenge to make sure all the details were in place,” says filmmaker Macdara Vallely of Babygirl.

Vallely said that the plot was inspired by real life scenes he witnesses in the Bronx, where he has lived for the past 13 years.

The filmmaker was on the 2 train when he saw a man eyeing a much-younger girl, but instead of approaching her, the man approached the girl’s mother and started flirting with her.

“They all got off the train together,” recalled Vallely. “It left an impression. I wondered what happened after that.”

There’s no telling what might have happened to the trio.

But his imagination led to a feature length film, which was screened at the Tribeca Film Festival and won awards in numerous festivals around the world.

Vallely said it is fitting that the movie is now featured at IPRHRFF, as the cast largely consists of Puerto Rican talent from the Bronx. The group also formed a de facto sounding board for questions Vallely had about the script. The members’ input proved helpful in creating an accurate representation of the Puerto Rican community in the Bronx.

“It’s a better movie for it,” he said. “I always try to make sure it’s accurate. It was a challenge to make sure all the details were in place.”

Properly conveying the Bronx to national and international audiences was important to Vallely, not the least because he is a Bronxite himself.

“It's special to do something that features my heritage," said artist and filmmaker Robert “Bobbito” García. Photo: Justin Francis

“It’s special to do something that features my heritage,” said artist and filmmaker Robert “Bobbito” García.
Photo: Justin Francis

He enjoys shooting in the borough, especially its parks.

“The parks tend to be an extension of our homes,” he explained. “I love how people celebrate their birthdays in the parks.”

The titular character in Babygirl, Lena, celebrates her 16th birthday in a park.

Equally enamored of the city’s parks is duo Robert “Bobbito” García and Kevin Couliau.

The filmmakers have teamed up for Doin’ It in the Park.

The documentary, which explores the pick-up basketball culture of New York City, has been screened at other festivals around the country, but this one has proven a particular honor for García.

“It’s special to do something that features my heritage,” said García, who is himself Puerto Rican. “There’s lot of representation of Latinos in the film.”

The hometown roots of the artist, DJ, writer, radio announcer, and streetball player are deep.

García’s home basketball court, dubbed The Goat, is nearby at 99th Street and Amsterdam Avenue, and his mother used to work in El Barrio.

Filmmaker duo García and Kevin Couliau (right) visited 180 courts all over the city. Photo: Justin Francis

Filmmaker duo García and Kevin Couliau (right) visited 180 courts all over the city.
Photo: Justin Francis

Latino basketballers like Crazy Legs and Corky Ortiz appear in the film, and the soundtrack was written by Grammy Award-winning Eddie Palmieri.

“How we managed to get him to score an indie film – I’m still wondering,” laughs García.

Doin’ It in the Park is García’s first film, and Palmieri’s first film soundtrack.

But García has long lived in the limelight.

A member of the Rock Steady Crew, which also appears in the movie, García has had a radio show, The Stretch Armstrong and Bobbito Show; has hosted shows on ESPN; has appeared in Nike commercials; and has competed in the Dyckman street basketball tournaments.

The Dyckman courts feature prominently in the documentary, as do many others.

There are 700 basketball courts in New York City and for the film; García and Couliau visited 180 courts all over the city.

With 50 films being presented this year, and attendance expected to double from last year’s festivities, the festival looks to continue to grow and bring even more films to the masses.

“I hope to have the next big Puerto Rican/Latino film festival in New York City,” says Caicedo.” She envisions it as a festival of 7-10 days and “10 hours a day of screening the best of Puerto Rican and Latino films.”

For more information on the International Puerto Rican Heritage Film Festival and the films that will be showcased, please visit www.iprhff.com.

 

Proyecciones con sazón

Historia por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer y Erik Cuello

"We have it all – features, shorts, narratives and documentaries,” explains Verónica Caicedo, Director and CEO of Third Annual International Puerto Rican Heritage Film Festival.

“Tenemos todo: largometrajes, cortos, documentales y narrativas”, explica Verónica Caicedo, Directora y CEO del Tercer Festival Anual Internacional de Cine de la Herencia Puertorriqueña

Si usted está buscando películas con sabor, está de suerte esta semana.

El Tercer Festival Internacional Anual de Cine de la Herencia Puertorriqueña (IPRHFF por sus siglas en inglés) comienza este miércoles 13 de noviembre los patrocinadores incluyen Telemundo 47, NBC-TV, el Centro Médico Mount Sinai, MIST Harlem, la Academia de medicina de Nueva York y Chivas.

Se presentará hasta el domingo 17 de noviembre e incluye películas que se centran en la vida de las familias en el Bronx y el norte de Manhattan.

Se espera que miles de personas asistan al festival, que destaca como una representación diversa de la herencia puertorriqueña, ya que cuenta con diversos medios de comunicación y todo lo que muchos consideran la propia meca de la experiencia puertorriqueña en Nueva York: El Barrio.

“Sentía que en El Barrio faltaba algo diferente a lo que hay ahora”, explicó Verónica Caicedo, Directora y CEO de IPRHFF.

“Tenemos todo: largometrajes, cortos, narraciones y documentales”.

Este año, el festival cuenta con la actriz de cine y televisión Lauren Vélez, quien recientemente se presentó en la aclamada serie dramática Dexter, como su portavoz oficial. Vélez, que creció en Rockaway Beach de la ciudad de Nueva York, encabezará los esfuerzos del festival para donar una porción de las ganancias de este año a las tareas de socorro.

Caicedo tiene claro lo que se requiere en la producción del festival.

“Determinación y compromiso”, dijo Caicedo. “Además, un buen sistema de apoyo”.

Television and film actress Lauren Vélez serves as the festival’s official spokesperson.

Lauren Vélez, actriz de cine y televisión, funge como portavoz oficial del festival.

“Hemos pasado de un día a 5, y de 15 a más de 50 películas en tan sólo el tercer año”, agregó Ernesto Malavé Jr., Director de Nuevos Medios de Comunicación y Relaciones Públicas de IPRHRFF.

“Más allá de la logística, lo que realmente sucede en este evento es una enorme cantidad de pasión”.

El festival tendrá lugar en gran parte del Centro Médico Mount Sinai.

No va a ser la primera tarea de cine para el hospital, que también ha sido sede del Festival de Cine Latino Internacional de Nueva York en los últimos años.

“Hicimos esto y fuimos contactados por el festival de cine”, recordó Zoraya Nazario, enlace comunitario del Departamento de Comunicación y Asuntos Gubernamentales de Mount Sinai. “Fue a través de rumores”.

Entre las películas que se proyectarán en el festival se encuentra Babygirl de Macdara Vallely, la segunda película del director irlandés, quien también escribió el guión.

Lena, la protagonista de la película (interpretada por la actriz Yainis Ynoa), está en el centro de una especie de triángulo amoroso que involucra a su madre, Lucy (Rosa Arredondo), y el novio más joven de su madre, Víctor (Flaco Navaja), que parece más interesado en Lena que en su madre. Lena espera exponer los verdaderos sentimientos de Víctor a su madre, pero la tarea se vuelve más complicada de lo que esperaba.

“It was a challenge to make sure all the details were in place,” says filmmaker Macdara Vallely of Babygirl.

“Fue un desafío el asegurar que todos los detalles estaban en su lugar”, dijo el cineasta Macdara Vallely de Babygirl.

Vallely dijo que la trama está inspirada en escenas de la vida real de las que fue testigo en el Bronx, donde ha vivido durante los últimos 13 años.

El cineasta estaba en el tren 2 cuando vio a un hombre mirando a una chica mucho más joven, pero en vez de acercarse a ella, el hombre se acercó a la madre de la niña y empezó a coquetear con ella.

“Todos se bajaron del tren juntos”, recordó Vallely. “Me dejó una impresión. Me pregunté qué pasó después de eso”.

No se sabe lo que pudo haber sucedido con el trío.

Pero su imaginación condujo a un largometraje que se proyectó en el Festival de Cine de Tribeca y ganó premios en numerosos festivales alrededor del mundo.

Vallely dijo que es lógico que la película ahora se presente en IPRHRFF, ya que el reparto se compone principalmente de talento puertorriqueño del Bronx. El grupo también formó un grupo de facto para las preguntas que Vallely tenía sobre el guión. La retroalimentación de los miembros demostró ser útil en la creación de una representación precisa de la comunidad puertorriqueña en el Bronx.

“It was a challenge to make sure all the details were in place,” says filmmaker Macdara Vallely of Babygirl.

Babygirl fue filmada en el Bronx.

“Es una mejor película por eso”, dijo. “Yo siempre trato de asegurarme de que es precisa. Fue un desafío el asegurar de que todos los detalles estaban en su lugar”.

Transmitir adecuadamente el Bronx al público nacional e internacional era importante para Vallely, y no poco, dado que él es oriundo del Bronx.

Disfruta filmar en la ciudad, especialmente sus parques.

“Los parques tienden a ser una extensión de nuestros hogares”, explicó. “Me encanta cómo la gente celebra sus cumpleaños en los parques”.

El personaje principal en Babygirl, Lena, celebra su cumpleaños 16 en un parque.

Igualmente enamorados de los parques de la ciudad están el dúo de Robert “Bobbito” García y Kevin Couliau.

Los cineastas hicieron equipo para Doin’ It in the Park.

El documental, que explora la cultura del baloncesto de la ciudad de Nueva York, ha sido exhibido en otros festivales de todo el país, pero estar en esta reunión en El Barrio ha demostrado ser un verdadero honor para García.

“Es especial hacer algo que muestra mi herencia”, dijo García, quien es puertorriqueño. “Hay mucha representación latina en la película”.

"Es especial hacer algo que muestra mi herencia", dijo el artista y director de cine Robert "Bobbito" García.Foto: Justin Francis

“Es especial hacer algo que muestra mi herencia”, dijo el artista y director de cine Robert “Bobbito” García.
Foto: Justin Francis

Las raíces de la ciudad natal del artista, DJ, escritor, locutor de radio y jugador de streetball son profundas.

La cancha de baloncesto en casa de García, conocido como La Cabra, se encuentra cerca de la calle 99 y la avenida Ámsterdam, y su madre trabajaba en El Barrio.

Basquetbolistas latinos, como Crazy Legs y Corky Ortiz, aparecen en la película y la banda sonora fue escrita por el ganador del Premio Grammy Eddie Palmieri.

“¿Cómo nos las arreglamos para conseguir que participara en una película independiente? No lo sé, todavía me lo pregunto”, ríe García.

Doin ‘It in the Park es la primera película de García, y la primera banda sonora de Palmieri.

Pero García ha vivido mucho tiempo en el centro de atención.

Miembro del personal de Steady Rock, que también aparece en la película, García ha tenido un programa de radio, The Stretch Armstrong and Bobbito Show; ha sido presentador de programas en ESPN, ha aparecido en anuncios de Nike, y ha competido en los torneos de baloncesto de la calle Dyckman.

Las canchas de Dyckman ocupan un lugar destacado en el documental, al igual que muchas otras.

Hay 700 canchas de baloncesto en la ciudad de Nueva York y para la película, García y Couliau visitaron 180 por toda la ciudad.

Con 50 películas que se presentan este año, se espera que se duplique la asistencia del año pasado, el festival busca consolidarse más en El Barrio y traer aún más películas para las masas.

“Espero tener el próximo gran festival de cine puertorriqueño/latino de la ciudad de Nueva York”, dice Caicedo. Lo imagina como un festival “de 7 a 10 días y 10 horas al día de proyección de lo mejor de las películas puertorriqueñas/latinas”.

Para obtener más información sobre el Festival Internacional de cine de la Herencia Puertorriqueña y las películas que se exhibirán, por favor visite www.iprhff.com.