Is this the first Hispanic NYPD Commissioner?

¿Será este el primer Comisionado hispano del Departamento de Policía?

¿Será este el primer Comisionado hispano del Departamento de Policía?

  • English
  • Español

Is this the first Hispanic NYPD Commissioner?

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“I did it through hard work,” said NYPD First Deputy Commissioner Rafael Pineiro, guest speaker at ManhattanCollege.

“I did it through hard work,” said NYPD First Deputy Commissioner Rafael Pineiro, guest speaker at ManhattanCollege.

Mayor-Elect Bill de Blasio has said that he would seek to replace Ray Kelly as the Commissioner of the New York Police Department (NYPD).

In response, some groups, including the NYPD Hispanic Society, have called on the upcoming mayor to name current Deputy Commissioner Rafael Pineiro – the highest ranking Latino in the department – as his successor.

“We don’t recommend Rafael Pineiro because he’s Latino. We recommend him because he has the credentials and the qualifications to lead the department,” said Detective Dennis González, president of the NYPD Hispanic Society in October. “We challenge the next mayor to demonstrate the commitment to the Latino community and make history by appointing the first ever Hispanic police commissioner.”

There were reports that during this past week’s legislative Somos El Futuro Conference in Puerto Rico Pineiro met privately with Mayor-Elect Bill de Blasio.

If appointed, he would be the NYPD’s first Latino Commissioner.

Pineiro immigrated to New York City from Cuba with his family when he was 12 and joined the NYPD in the 1970’s, where he was assigned to Times Square.

Most recently, Pineiro was the chief of personnel for the NYPD, and in this role, streamlined a digital personnel system that utilizes computer-based programs to carry out and track essential procedures. He also has served as commanding officer of the 41st Precinct, as well as in the Office of the Police Commissioner, Patrol Borough Bronx, the Criminal Justice Bureau, MISD, and the Recruitment and Retention Unit.

“They don’t ride in the patrol cars and see what’s going on,” said administrator Al Heyward of NYPD brass.

“They don’t ride in the patrol cars and see what’s going on,” said administrator Al Heyward of NYPD brass.

In addition to his over four decades of experience with the NYPD, Pineiro has a bachelor’s degree in science from the New York Institute of Technology, received a master’s in public administration from New YorkUniversity and a law degree from BrooklynLawSchool. Moreover, he has completed a John B. Fellowship at Harvard University, and was part of the first class of the Police Management Institute at ColumbiaUniversity.

But it was ManhattanCollege that Pineiro visited this past Mon., Oct. 29 as part of the university’s series of events celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month. Students, faculty and campus visitors dined on enchiladas, ropa vieja, rice, beans and gelatin during the luncheon.

The First Deputy Commissioner’s visit, and the bountiful feast, were planned by the school’s Diversity Committee, the Public Safety Department, the Alumni Relations Office and the Manhattan College Latino Alumni Club.

Pineiro discussed his ascent on the force as a patrolman in Times Square to First Deputy Commissioner. He also spoke of his experience being one of only 300 Latinos on the force when he joined in 1970.

Students and staff in ManhattanCollege’s Smith Auditorium.

Students and staff in ManhattanCollege’s Smith Auditorium.

Now, the department is 25 percent Latino.

“I didn’t have any friends on the Police Department,” he said. “I didn’t have any family on the Police Department, and didn’t know any politicians. I did it through hard work.”

And he gave the NYPD largely positive reviews.

“There’s a lot of room for improvement,” he remarked. “There’s a lot to look at, but the NYPD has done a great job,” he said, pointing to dramatic drops in crime over the past decades.

In his formal address, Pineiro did not comment on stop and frisk, and when the audience was invited to pose questions, they focused on the controversial policy.

One audience member who spoke was the mother of a son who had recently been stopped. As she explained it, her teenage son did not have any identification on him at the time, and was detained overnight after being stopped. She said that at the time her son was being stopped, one of the officers placed his own gun on the ground, and claimed that the her son or one of his friends had it on their person—then retracted the charge, calling it a joke.

Kelly Alvarado is part of ManhattanCollege’s Diversity Committee, which helped organize Pineiro’s visit.

Kelly Alvarado is part of ManhattanCollege’s Diversity Committee, which helped organize Pineiro’s visit.

“I was converted about gangs,” said the mother. “But it turns out I had to be fearful of the police,” she charged. “You’re saying all these wonderful things about the police department, but nothing could be farther from the truth as far as reality is concerned.”

Pineiro expressed shock at the incident, and told the woman it would be investigated. He also encouraged citizens to file reports with the Civilian Review Board when such an incident occurs so that the Police Department is made aware of any potential misdeeds.

Al Heyward, an administrator at ManhattanCollege, also spoke up after Pineiro’s presentation, and said there might be a disconnect between NYPD brass like Pineiro and officers on the street.

“They’re up there, they don’t ride in the patrol cars and see what’s going on,” he told The Bronx Free Press of NYPD’s top personnel.

Heyward asked Pineiro if he thought stop and frisk should be modified.

Pineiro responded by saying that it was “an essential tool,” but he also said that he understood there were legal limitations.

“Cops are not lawyers,” he said. “If we’re going to enforce the law, we have to abide by the law.”

He also said that officers have to tell people why they’re being stopped.

“It’s an effective thing to do,” he said.

¿Será este el primer Comisionado hispano del Departamento de Policía?

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“I did it through hard work,” said NYPD First Deputy Commissioner Rafael Pineiro, guest speaker at ManhattanCollege.

“Lo hice a través del trabajo duro”, dijo el primer Comisionado Adjunto del NYPD, Rafael Pineiro, orador invitado en el Manhattan College.

El alcalde electo Bill de Blasio ha dicho que buscará reemplazar a Ray Kelly como Comisionado del Departamento de Policía de Nueva York (NYPD por sus siglas en inglés).

En respuesta, algunos grupos, como la Sociedad Hispana del NYPD, le ha pedido al próximo alcalde nombrar al actual Comisionado Adjunto Rafael Pineiro, el latino de más alto rango en el departamento, como su sucesor.

“No recomendamos a Rafael Pineiro porque es latino. Lo recomendamos porque tiene las credenciales y las calificaciones para liderar el departamento”, dijo el detective Dennis González, presidente de la Sociedad Hispana del NYPD en octubre. “Desafiamos al próximo alcalde a demostrar el compromiso con la comunidad latina y hacer historia nombrando al primer comisionado latino en la historia de la policía”.

Hubo informes de que durante la Conferencia Legislativa Somos El Futuro de la semana pasada en Puerto Rico, Pineiro se reunió en privado con el alcalde electo Bill de Blasio.

Si es nombrado, él sería el primer comisionado latino del NYPD.

Pineiro emigró a la ciudad de Nueva York desde Cuba con su familia cuando tenía 12 años y se unió al NYPD en 1970, siendo asignado a Times Square.

Más recientemente, Pineiro fue jefe de personal del NYPD, y en esa función, simplificó un sistema digital personal que utiliza programas basados en computadoras para realizar seguimientos y procedimientos esenciales. También se ha desempeñado como Comandante de la Comisaría 41, así como en la Oficina del Comisionado de la Policía, la patrulla del condado del Bronx, la Oficina de Justicia Penal, MISD y la Unidad de Reclutamiento y Retención.

“They don’t ride in the patrol cars and see what’s going on,” said administrator Al Heyward of NYPD brass.

“Ellos no viajan en los coches patrulla y ven lo que está pasando”, dijo el administrador Al Heyward de los jefes del NYPD.

Además de sus más de cuatro décadas de experiencia con el NYPD, Pineiro tiene una licenciatura en ciencias en el Instituto de Tecnología de Nueva York, recibió una maestría en administración pública de la Universidad de Nueva York y una licenciatura en Derecho de la Escuela de Leyes de Brooklyn. Por otra parte, ha completado una beca John B. en la Universidad de Harvard y fue parte de la primera promoción del Instituto de Gestión de la Policía en la Universidad de Columbia.

Pero fue el Manhattan College el que Pineiro visitó el pasado lunes29 de octubre como parte de la serie de eventos para celebrar el Mes Nacional de la Herencia Hispana. Visitantes del campus, estudiantes y el profesorado comieron enchiladas, ropa vieja, arroz, frijoles y gelatina durante el almuerzo.

La visita del Primer Comisionado Adjunto, y la generosa fiesta, fueron planeadas por el Comité de  diversidad de la escuela, el Departamento de Seguridad Pública, la Oficina de Relaciones Alumni y el Alumni latino Club del Manhattan College

Pineiro habló de su ascenso en la fuerza de patrullero en Times Square a primer Comisionado Adjunto. También habló de su experiencia como uno de los 300 latinos en la fuerza cuando se unió en 1970.

Students and staff in ManhattanCollege’s Smith Auditorium.

Estudiantes y personal en el auditorio Smith del Manhattan College.

Ahora, el departamento es 25 por ciento latino.

“Yo no tenía amigos en el Departamento de Policía”, dijo. “Yo no tenía familia en el Departamento de Policía, y no conocía a ningún político. Lo hice a través del trabajo duro”.

Y le dio al NYPD críticas muy positivas.

“Hay mucho espacio para mejorar”, remarcó. “Hay mucho que ver, pero el NYPD ha hecho un gran trabajo”, dijo, señalando la dramática disminución de la delincuencia en las últimas décadas.

En su discurso formal, Pineiro no hizo ningún comentario sobre las detenciones y cacheos, y cuando se invitó a la audiencia a hacer preguntas, el público se centró en la controversial política.

Kelly Alvarado is part of ManhattanCollege’s Diversity Committee, which helped organize Pineiro’s visit.

Kelly Alvarado es parte del Comité de la Diversidad del Manhattan College, que ayudó a organizar la visita de Pineiro.

Una persona de la audiencia comentó ser la madre de un hijo que había sido detenido recientemente. Como lo explicó, su hijo adolescente no tenía ninguna identificación con él en ese momento, y fue detenido durante la noche. Dijo que en el momento de que su hijo fue detenido, uno de los agentes puso su propia arma en el suelo y afirmó que su hijo o uno de sus amigos la tenían consigo, después se retractó de la acusación, calificándola como una broma.

“Estaba preocupada por las pandillas”, dijo la madre. “Pero resulta que tenía que tener miedo de la policía”, señaló. “Usted está diciendo todas estas cosas maravillosas sobre el departamento de policía, pero nada podría estar más lejos de la verdad en lo que se refiere a la realidad”.

Pineiro expresó su consternación por el incidente, y dijo a la mujer que sería investigado. También alentó a los ciudadanos a presentar informes a la Junta Civil de Revisión cuando un incidente ocurre para que el Departamento de Policía esté al tanto de cualquier falta posible.

Al Heyward, un administrador en el Manhattan College, también tomó la palabra después de la presentación de Pineiro, y dijo que podría haber una desconexión entre el NYPD jefes como Piñeiro y los oficiales en la calle.

“Ellos están allí, no viajan en los coches patrulla y ven lo que está pasando”, dijo a The Bronx Free Press de los altos jefes del NYPD.

Heyward preguntó a Pineiro si pensaba que la política de detención y cacheo debía ser modificada.

Pineiro respondió diciendo que era “un instrumento fundamental”, pero también dijo que entendía que había limitaciones legales.

“Los policías no son abogados”, dijo. “Si vamos a hacer cumplir la ley, tenemos que respetar la ley”.

También dijo que los funcionarios tienen que decirle a la gente por qué está siendo detenida.

“Es una cosa eficaz de hacer”, dijo.