Through traffic, a corridor of art

A través del tráfico, un corredor de arte

A través del tráfico, un corredor de arte

  • English
  • Español

Through traffic, a corridor of art

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“The Bronx Rising” mural is the final public artwork of the StreetWise: Hunts Point campaign.

“The Bronx Rising” mural is the final public artwork of the StreetWise: Hunts Point campaign.

Hunts Point has one of the highest asthma rates of the city.

According to a 2010 Lehman College study, between a quarter to a third of school children in the area have asthma.

The area also has some of the highest traffic volume in the city.

About 20,000 diesel trucks go through the neighborhood each week.

But something else is set to put it on the map.

A new mural was unveiled this past month, creating a colorful precedent.

“This creates a corridor of art in Hunts Point that was not here before,” said Charles Ukegbu, the Deputy Borough Commissioner of the Department of Transportation (DOT).

Groundswell, a non-profit that uses art as a tool for social change, has completed numerous murals in the area.

Its newest addition, “Bronx Rising,” was unveiled on Fri., Sept. 6th.

Groundswell, in collaboration with the DOT, created a mural with a clear message: “Don’t Move, Improve.” The mural seeks to represent a community-inspired vision for the neighborhood as one on the rise. In the mural, a central figure of a young girl is supported on either side by elders from her neighborhood who have worked to achieve a safer, more sustainable community. Figures above plant trees, re-imagine the streetscape, and direct residents to newly created neighborhood parks.

“[It] reminds people they can make a difference,” said youth artist Angie Román.

“[It] reminds people they can make a difference,” said youth artist Angie Román.

“People think the Bronx is a bad place, but this mural changes that stereotype. People want to leave, but just because the community is bad doesn’t mean you can’t change it.

The mural reminds people they can make a difference,” said Angie Román, a youth participant in Groundswell and Hunts Point resident.

This summer, 15 young people, including Roman, participated in Groundswell’s Summer Leadership Institute (SLI) and collaborated with artists Crystal Bruno and Adam Kidder to research, design, and fabricate the multi-story mural overlooking Hunts Point Avenue.

“Bronx Rising” is the final public artwork created as part of the two-year StreetWise: Hunts Point campaign.

The mandate to stay put and make things better was written in bold green letters, just above scenes of life in Hunts Point, including residents choked in smog caused by diesel trucks that rumbled into the nearby Terminal Market.

But the mural, situated above Tub and Tumble Laundromat, tells not only of the problems faced by residents of Hunts Point, but also spotlights a solution, a greenway, which is clearly visible.

The eye-catching mural succeeded in garnering the attention of passerby.

“Oh my goodness!” exclaimed Debra Mozon, who walked past with her baby niece. “I came by last week and I saw the guys doing work. I love this in my neighborhood. It’s gorgeous.”

“This creates a corridor of art,” said Charles Ukegbu, the Deputy Borough Commissioner of the Department of Transportation (DOT).

“This creates a corridor of art,” said Charles Ukegbu, the Deputy Borough Commissioner of the Department of Transportation (DOT).

Bruno was the lead muralist on the project; she worked with Kidder and the youth artists. The mural was born of many sources, explained Bruno, including surveys of the neighborhood, walk-through interviews, and even air quality tests.

After speaking with residents about their traffic and environment-related concerns, the students designed the mural, and then painted it on parachute cloth which was pasted to the side of the building.

At the top left corner of the mural is a Wayfinder kiosk.

Wayfinder kiosks, which are interactive touch screen maps, are already utilized downtown at Battery Park and other areas of the city.

“So why not here, in Hunts Point? There’s a multi-billion dollar project on the greenway to provide relief from this concrete environment,” observed Bruno.

The Wayfinder will come in handy, she insisted, as residents will need to know how to access the pathway and other open spaces in the area, such as nearby Barretto Point Park and Riverside Park, by the Bronx River.

A group of about 15 people participated in Groundswell's Summer Leadership Institute to create the mural. Photo: Crystal Bruno

A group of about 15 people participated in Groundswell’s Summer Leadership Institute to create the mural. Photo: Crystal Bruno

Within the mural, the kiosk seems to be planted by a DOT worker—perhaps hinting at a possible collaboration.

“It’s a nice idea,” said the DOT’s Ukegbu, who was not able to divulge any more information about plans for the kiosks, hypothetical or otherwise.

The DOT has tackled a number of transportation issues in Hunts Point. The department created a green medium, filled with trees, to help filter the air, and has rerouted trucks going to and from the Hunts Point Terminal Market to prevent them from driving through residential areas. It also offers rebates and tax incentives for companies to purchase vehicles that use biofuels, explained Ukegbu.

But there continue to be many trucks.

“Trucks are a sign of economic activity,” noted Ukegbu.

As a Hunts Point resident, Mozon knows about the trucks all too well.

“I’m not crazy about them, but I liked the way they changed the route. Before, they used to go straight through the area where the kids were playing.”

The process of putting up the mural brought to Bruno’s attention a different issue in the neighborhood.

“I felt more responsible and intact with my neighborhood,” said Dejean Aiken.

“I felt more responsible and intact with my neighborhood,” said Dejean Aiken.

“Yesterday, someone shot a gun right in broad daylight,” she recalled, shaking her head. “What if they accidentally shot a kid?”

Mozon witnessed a shooting one night last week as well, when she was on her way to the laundromat and heard the shots right outside.

“I ran in and told everyone to duck.”

No one was hurt, but the incidents have rattled her and other residents.

“We need harmony and togetherness,” she said. “We’re a community, so let’s start acting like one.”

Youth artist Dejean Aiken, 18, was already thinking of his next project.

He said he an idea for another mural that would address all of the issues in Hunts Point at once. He envisioned a large painting that would be focused on the theme of “organizing” and that would feature social activists like the Black Panthers, Young Lords, and participants of May Day marches to inspire residents.

He would know.

“Social activism is an art form too,” he remarked. “When I was working on the mural, I felt more responsible and intact with my neighborhood.”

For more on the Groundwell mural projects, please visit www.groundswellmural.org.

A través del tráfico, un corredor de arte

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“The Bronx Rising” mural is the final public artwork of the StreetWise: Hunts Point campaign.

El mural “Bronx Rising” es el ultimo proyecto de la campaña “StreetWise: Hunts Point”.

Hunts Point tiene uno de los índices más altos de asma en la ciudad.

Según un estudio del 2010 del Colegio Lehman, de un cuarto a un tercio de los niños escolares en el área tienen asma.

También cuentan con la mayor cantidad de tráfico.

Cerca de 20,000 camiones de diesel pasan a través del vecindario cada semana.

Pero a lo mejor algo más podría ponerse en el mapa.

Un nuevo mural, titulado “Bronx Rising”, fue develado este pasado mes, añadiendo un precedente colorido.

“Esto crea un corredor de arte en Hunts Point que no estaba aquí antes”, dijo Charles Ukegbu, Comisionado Suplente del condado del Departamento de Transportación (DOT, por sus siglas en inglés).

Groundswell, una sin fines de lucro que utiliza el arte como herramienta para un cambio social, ha completado varios murales en el área.

Su nueva adición se dio a conocer el viernes, 6 de septiembre.

Groundswell, en colaboración con el DOT, creó un mural con una mensaje claro: No se Mude, Mejore.

“[It] reminds people they can make a difference,” said youth artist Angie Román.

“El mural le recuerda a las personas que pueden hacer la diferencia”, dijo artista Angie Roman.

El mural busca representar una visión inspirada en la comunidad como uno en la subida. En el mural, la figura central de una joven es apoyado de ambos lados por los ancianos de su barrio que han trabajado para lograr una comunidad más segura y más sostenible. Otras figuras siembran árboles, re-imaginan el paisaje urbano y dirigen los residentes a los parques recién creados.

“La gente piensa que el Bronx es un lugar malo, pero este mural cambia ese estereotipo. La gente se quiere ir, pero solo porque la comunidad sea mala no significa que no puedes cambiarla. El mural le recuerda a las personas que pueden hacer la diferencia”, dijo Angie Román, una joven participante de Groundswell y residente de Hunts Point.

Este verano, 15 jóvenes, entre ellos Romano, participaron en el Instituto de Liderazgo de Groundswell (SLI, por sus siglas en ingles) y colaboraron con artistas Crystal Bruno y Adam Kidder para investigar, diseñar y fabricar el mural de varios pisos con vistas a la Avenida Hunts Point.

“Bronx Rising” es la obra final creado como parte de la campana de dos años de “StreetWise: Hunts Point”.

El mandato de no mudarse y luchar por el mejoramiento fue escrito es ensombrecidas letras verdes sobre el paisaje local el cual representa a residentes ahogándose en humo causado por los camiones de diesel que pasan al Terminal de Hunts Point. Pero el mural, situado encima de ‘Tub and Tumble Laundromat’, narra no solo uno de los problemas enfrentados por residentes de Hunts Point, sino también una solución de instalar un camino verde – visible en el moral, y la calle que enfrenta.

“This creates a corridor of art,” said Charles Ukegbu, the Deputy Borough Commissioner of the Department of Transportation (DOT).

“Esto crea un corredor de arte”, dijo Charles Ukegbu, Comisionado Suplente del condado del Departamento de Transportación.

El mural definitivamente logro llamar la atención de los transeúntes locales. “¡Oh, Dios mío!” exclamo Debra Mozon, quien estaba pasando por el mural con su sobrina bebe. “Pasee por aquí la semana pasada y vi a los chicos trabajando. Los mire por 30 minutos. Me encanta esto en mi vecindario, es maravilloso”.

Crystal Bruno fue la muralista principal del proyecto; trabajó con Adam Kidder, también de Groundswell, y los jóvenes artistas.

Mientras que el mural es una pieza de arte, es también el fruto de encuestas en el vecindario, caminatas y pruebas de calidad de aire, explicó Bruno.

Luego de realizar encuestas entre los residentes acerca de sus preocupaciones de tráfico y ambientales, los estudiantes diseñaron el mural, y lo pintaron en una tela de paracaídas la cual luego fue plasmada al lado del edificio.

En la esquina superior izquierda del mural hay un kiosco Wayfinder. Los kioscos Wayfinder, mapas interactivos de pantalla táctil, ya son utilizados en el Parque Battery y otras áreas de la ciudad.

Crystal Bruno was the lead muralist.

Crystal Bruno fue la artista principal.

“¿Así es que porque no aquí, en Hunts Point? Hay un proyecto multimillonario en la vía verde para proveer alivio de este ambiente de concreto”, dijo Bruno.

Y los residentes necesitan saber como acceder a eso y otros espacios verdes en el área, como los cercanos Parques Barrett Point y Riverside, en el Río Bronx, ella insistió.

“Esperamos que con este mural habrán kioscos”, dijo Ramon.

En el mural, el kiosco parece ser plantado por un empleado de la DOT – tal vez haciendo alusión a una posible asociación.

“Es una buena idea”, dijo Ukegbu del DOT, quien no pudo divulgar mas información acerca de los planes para los kioscos, hipotéticos o de otro tipo.

La DOT ha abordado un número de asuntos de transportación en Hunts Point. La DOT creó un medio verde, lleno de árboles, para ayudar a filtrar el aire, y ha desviado camiones que van y vienen del Terminal de Hunts Point para prevenirlos de conducir a través de áreas residenciales. También ofrece descuentos e incentivos de impuestos para que las compañías compren vehículos que utilicen biocombustibles, explicó Ukegbu de la DOT.

Pero continua habiendo muchos camiones.

“Los camiones son una señal de actividad económica”, dijo Ukegbu.

“I felt more responsible and intact with my neighborhood,” said Dejean Aiken.

“Me sentí más responsable e intacto con mi vecindario”, dijo Dejean Aiken.

Como residente de Hunts Point, Mozon conoce muy bien acerca de los camiones.

“No me vuelven loco, pero me gusta de la manera que cambiaron la ruta. Antes solían pasar directo a través del área donde los niños estaban jugando”.

El proceso de colocar el mural trajo la atención de Bruno a un problema diferente en el vecindario.

“Ayer, alguien disparó justo en pleno día”, recordó moviendo su cabeza. “¿Qué tal si accidentalmente le disparan a un niño?”

Mozon presenció un tiroteo una noche la semana pasada, cuando iba camino a la lavandería a lavar su ropa cuando escuchó los tiros justo afuera.

“Corrí y le dije a todo el mundo que se escondiera”.

Nadie fue herido, pero los incidentes la han desconcertado a ella y a otros residentes.

“Necesitamos armonía y unirnos. Somos una comunidad, así es que vamos a comenzar a actuar como una”.

El joven artista Dejean Aiken, de 18 años, tiene una idea para un mural que se dirigiría hacia todos los asuntos que suceden en Hunts Point: un tema organizado presentando activistas sociales como ‘Black Panthers’, ‘Young Lords’ y participantes de las protestas de ‘May Day’ para poner a los residentes en el sentido de acción.

El sabría algo sobre movilización.

“El activismo social también es una forma de arte”, dijo el jove artista. “Cuando estaba trabajando en el mural me sentí más responsable e intacto con mi vecindario”.

Para más sobre los proyectos de Groundwell, favor visite www.groundswellmural.org.