These New Heights
Las nuevas alturas

  • English
  • Español

These New Heights

Affordable housing project opens on Jerome Avenue

By Gregg McQueen

The ribbon-cutting.

“If you don’t have a roof over your head, you’re already defeated,” said Jean Hill.

Hill, who serves as Community Board 7 (CB7) Chair, was referring to the urgent need to provide housing for people coming out of the city’s shelter system.

“You cannot raise your children in a stable environment, you cannot really function in society if you don’t have a decent place to come home to at night,” she said.

Hill spoke at the grand opening of a new affordable housing complex at 2700 Jerome Avenue, which provides 135 apartments for families and individuals, with 40 units earmarked for formerly homeless families.

Known as Kingsbridge Heights Apartments, the 13-story building includes an outdoor playground, fitness room, community room with computers and children’s library, parking lot, and an attended lobby.

“It’s a beautiful building, with all the amenities,” said City Councilmember Fernando Cabrera. “I mean, who wouldn’t want to live here?”

Rents range from $860 per month for a studio apartment to $1,940 per month for a three bedroom, according to the city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD). Units are allocated through HPD’s Housing Connect lottery.

Half of the apartments are reserved specifically for CB7 residents.

The outdoor mural was designed by artist Rafael Esquer.

Tenant María Álvarez said she struggled to find housing before landing an apartment in the building. She currently lives with her son, who has muscular dystrophy.

“I can happily say today that I made it. I finally have a place that I can call home,” she said.

The project was developed by B&B Urban in partnership with L+M Development Partners and the Center for Urban Community Services (CUCS), which will provide onsite support services.

It was financed with support from HPD and New York State Homes and Community Renewal, the state’s affordable housing agency.

Constructed on the former site of a nightclub and a car wash, the building is situated directly across from the Kingsbridge Armory, next to the 4 subway line, and a few blocks from St. James Park.

“The completion of the mixed-income Kingsbridge Heights Apartments demonstrates that the city’s most urgent housing needs can be addressed — providing new housing for formerly homeless families — while also addressing the broader needs of the local community for affordable housing for low and middle-income households,” said Alan Bell, Principal of B&B Urban. “Sound planning principles have been followed by locating this much-needed housing close to vibrant retail and community services, subways, schools, and parks.”

“We’re all just people when we come home,” said CB7 Chair Jean Hill.

“We’re all just people when we come home at the end of the day. Whether you’re wealthy or live in a shelter, we all are human beings and deserve a decent place to come home to,” Hill said.

A ribbon cutting was held on Wed., May 22 featuring city and state officials, and members of the development team.

Molly Park, HPD’s Deputy Commissioner of Development, shared an anecdote regarding a primary care doctor whose patient’s health improved dramatically once he left the shelter system.

“That’s why we do what we do every day; it is because housing is the foundation that health is built on. Housing is the foundation that the kids who live in this building will flourish educationally,” said Park. “There is so much that we cannot do if we don’t invest in our housing and our communities.”

“Through Housing New York, the affordable housing we are producing at a record pace is serving more of the city’s most vulnerable,” said Deputy Mayor Vicki Been.

Onsite support services for residents will include individual case management, mental health and substance abuse management, as well as employment and education assistance, according to CUCS Chief Executive Officer Tony Hannigan. He said CUCS will have seven full-time staff members at the building.

“First and foremost, we want to make sure that people don’t return to homelessness,” he said. In addition to Kingsbridge Heights Apartments, CUCS provides services in two other Bronx housing complexes.

Hannigan noted the recent trend of including units for formerly homeless individuals in affordable housing projects.

“Integration is a good thing, and we should be doing more of it everywhere,” he said.

The building also features an outdoor patio with a mural designed by artist Rafael Esquer, a Mexican-born artist who created another mural for B&B Urban at the Welton House, a supportive housing residence for veterans and young adults located in Manhattan.

There are 135 apartments for families and individuals.

“It’s to honor the Bronx, and give something that the community is proud of, along with a little bit of history,” Esquer said.

“We’ve had very positive feedback from residents,” he said. “When we were painting it, people would shout from the windows, ‘You’re doing a great job. We love it!”

The energy-efficient building includes 165 rooftop solar panels, Bell said.

About 40 percent of the building is already occupied, he said. Tenants began moving in during the month of April.

Bell said that CB7 was intimately involved in providing feedback on the project. “They’ve been dealing with this for two years now,” he said. “They’ve been a great partner. I want to thank our neighbors for embracing us. It’s a testament to how well you can execute a project.”

Hill remarked that her Community Board is tough to impress. “We will push back on developers to make sure that when you come into our area, we are looking for quality construction, we’re looking for mixed-income housing,” she said.

“Trust me, if we don’t like your project, we will give you a hard time,” she stated.

“I want to thank our neighbors for embracing us,” said B&B Urban Principal Alan Bell.

Hannigan praised the features of the Kingsbridge Heights Apartments. “The building — the beauty, the amenities — would rival any market-rate building in the city,” he remarked. “We should be making housing for homeless people that is as good as anybody else is living in, maybe even better because of what they’ve been through.”

Despite all the bells and whistles at the new building, Hill said what matters most is the support it gives low-income and homeless Bronxites. She explained that many people in the neighborhood, which is in the process of being rezoned, have concerns about displacement.

“The long-term impact is what I’m most interested in seeing, how it really impacts the families that are living here and helps them,” she said. “That’s what this community is keeping an eye on.”

                   

Las nuevas alturas

Proyecto de vivienda asequible abre en la avenida Jerome

By Gregg McQueen

El área de juegos al aire libre.

“Si no tiene un techo sobre su cabeza, ya está derrotado”, dijo Jean Hill.

Hill, quien se desempeña como presidenta de la Junta Comunitaria 7 (CB7, por sus siglas en inglés), se refería a la urgente necesidad de proporcionar viviendas para las personas que salen del sistema de refugios de la ciudad.

“No puedes criar a tus hijos en un ambiente estable, no puedes realmente funcionar en la sociedad si no tienes un lugar decente para volver a casa por la noche”, dijo.

Hill habló en la inauguración de un nuevo complejo de viviendas asequibles en el No. 2700 de la avenida Jerome, que ofrece 135 apartamentos para familias e individuos, con 40 unidades destinadas a familias previamente sin hogar.

Conocido como Kingsbridge Heights Apartments, el edificio de 13 pisos incluye un área de juegos al aire libre, gimnasio, sala comunitaria con computadoras y biblioteca para niños y estacionamiento.

“Es un hermoso edificio, con todos los servicios”, dijo el concejal Fernando Cabrera. “Quiero decir, ¿quién no querría vivir aquí?”.

Los alquileres varían desde $860 dólares por mes para un apartamento tipo estudio hasta $1,940 por mes para un apartamento de tres habitaciones, de acuerdo con el Departamento de Preservación y Desarrollo de la Vivienda (HPD, por sus siglas en inglés) de la ciudad. Las unidades se asignan a través de la lotería Housing Connect del HPD.

La mitad de los apartamentos están reservados específicamente para residentes de la CB7.

“¿Quién no querría vivir aquí?”, preguntó el concejal Fernando Cabrera.

La inquilina María Álvarez dijo que luchó por encontrar una vivienda antes de aterrizar en un apartamento en el edificio. Actualmente vive con su hijo, quien tiene distrofia muscular.

“Felizmente puedo decir hoy que lo logré, finalmente tengo un lugar al que puedo llamar hogar”, dijo.

El proyecto fue desarrollado por B&B Urban, en colaboración con L+M Development Partners y el Centro de Servicios Comunitarios Urbanos (CUCS, por sus siglas en inglés), que brindará servicios de apoyo in situ.

Fue financiado con el apoyo del HPD y Hogares y Renovación Comunitaria del estado de Nueva York, la agencia estatal de vivienda asequible.

Construido en el antiguo espacio de una discoteca y un lavado de autos, el edificio está situado justo enfrente de la Armería Kingsbridge, al lado de la línea 4 del metro, y a pocas cuadras de St. James Park.

“La finalización de los apartamentos de ingresos mixtos en Kingsbridge Heights Apartments demuestra que las necesidades de vivienda más urgentes de la ciudad se pueden atender (proporcionando nuevas viviendas para familias que anteriormente se encontraban sin hogar) al tiempo que se abordan las necesidades más amplias de la comunidad local de viviendas asequibles para personas de bajos y medianos ingresos”, dijo Alan Bell, director de B&B Urban. “Se han seguido principios de planificación sólidos al ubicar esta vivienda tan necesaria cerca de los vibrantes servicios minoristas y comunitarios, el metro, las escuelas y los parques”.

“La vivienda es la base sobre la que se construye la salud”, dijo la comisionada adjunta del HPD, Molly Park.

“Simplemente somos personas cuando llegamos a casa al final del día. Ya sea si eres rico o vives en un refugio, todos somos seres humanos y merecemos un lugar digno al cual volver a casa”, dijo Hill.

Se realizó un corte de cinta el miércoles, 22 de mayo, en el que participaron funcionarios de la ciudad y del estado, y miembros del equipo de desarrollo.

Molly Park, comisionada adjunta de Desarrollo del HPD, compartió una anécdota personal sobre un médico de atención primaria cuyo paciente mejoró dramáticamente su salud una vez que abandonó el sistema de refugios.

“Es por eso que hacemos lo que hacemos todos los días; porque la vivienda es la base sobre la cual se construye la salud, la base sobre la cual los niños que viven florecerán educativamente”, dijo Park.

“Hay tanto que no podemos hacer si no invertimos en nuestra vivienda y nuestras comunidades”.

“A través de Housing New York, las viviendas asequibles que estamos produciendo a un ritmo récord están sirviendo a más de los más vulnerables de la ciudad”, dijo la vice alcaldesa Vicki Been.

Los servicios de apoyo in situ para residentes incluirán gestión de casos individuales, salud mental y tratamiento del abuso de sustancias, así como asistencia para empleo y educación, de acuerdo con el director ejecutivo de CUCS, Tony Hannigan. Dijo que CUCS tendrá siete miembros del personal a tiempo completo en el edificio.

El director general de CUCS, Tony Hannigan.

“En primer lugar, queremos asegurarnos de que las personas no vuelvan a quedarse sin hogar”, dijo. Además de Kingsbridge Heights Apartments, CUCS brinda servicios en otros dos complejos de viviendas del Bronx.

Hannigan destacó la tendencia reciente de incluir unidades para personas que anteriormente no tenían hogar en proyectos de viviendas asequibles.

“La integración es algo bueno, y deberíamos estar haciendo más en todas partes”, dijo.

El edificio también cuenta con un patio al aire libre con un mural diseñado por el artista Rafael Esquer, un artista nacido en México que creó otro mural para B&B Urban en la Casa Welton, una residencia de apoyo para veteranos y adultos jóvenes ubicada en Manhattan.

“Es para honrar al Bronx y retribuir algo de lo que la comunidad esté orgullosa, junto con un poco de historia”, dijo Esquer. “Hemos tenido comentarios muy positivos de los residentes”, dijo. “Cuando lo estábamos pintando, la gente gritaba desde las ventanas: están haciendo un gran trabajo. ¡Lo amamos!”.

El edificio de eficiencia energética incluye 165 paneles solares en el techo, dijo Bell.

Alrededor del 40 por ciento del edificio ya está ocupado, dijo. Los inquilinos comenzaron a mudarse durante el mes de abril.

El edificio cuenta con biblioteca y centro de informática.

Bell explicó que la CB7 está íntimamente involucrada en proporcionar comentarios sobre el proyecto. “Han estado lidiando con esto durante dos años”, explicó. “Han sido un gran socio. Quiero agradecer a nuestros vecinos por abrazarnos. Es un testimonio de lo bien que puede ejecutar un proyecto”.

Hill comentó que su Junta Comunitaria es difícil de impresionar. “Hacemos retroceder a los desarrolladores para asegurarnos de que cuando ingresen a nuestra área sepan que buscamos una construcción de calidad, viviendas de ingresos mixtos”, dijo. “Créanme, si no nos gusta su proyecto, les haremos pasar un mal momento”, afirmó.

Hannigan elogió las características de los Kingsbridge Heights Apartments. “El edificio, la belleza, las amenidades, rivalizarían con cualquier edificio de precio de mercado en la ciudad”, comentó. “Deberíamos estar haciendo viviendas para personas sin hogar que sean tan buenas como la de cualquier otra persona, tal vez incluso mejor por lo que han pasado”.

A pesar de toda la parafernalia en el nuevo edificio, Hill dijo que lo que más importa es el apoyo que brinda a los oriundos del Bronx de bajos ingresos y sin hogar. Explicó que muchas personas en el vecindario, que están en proceso de ser rezonificadas, tienen inquietudes acerca del desplazamiento.

“El impacto a largo plazo es lo que más me interesa ver, cómo afecta realmente a las familias que viven aquí y les ayuda”, dijo. “Eso es lo que esta comunidad está vigilando”.