“The time is now”
“El momento es ahora” 

  • English
  • Español

“The time is now”

Council bill grants non-citizens the right to vote

By Gregg McQueen

“Today, I’m finally being seen,” said Melissa John.

Get to the polls.

The New York City Council has passed hard-fought legislation on December 9 that would grant non-citizens the right to vote in municipal elections.

Known as Intro 1867, the bill would allow New Yorkers with green cards or work authorization in the U.S. to cast votes in local elections for Mayor, City Council, Borough President, Comptroller and Public Advocate, provided they have lived in the city for at least 30 days.

They would not be permitted to vote in federal or state elections.

It is expected to impact over 800,000 people in New York City.

Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez spoke prior to Council vote. Photo: Willam Alatriste | NYC Council

Following a spirited debate over the bill at its stated meeting, the City Council voted to pass the law, with 33 Councilmembers voting in favor, 14 voting against and two abstentions.

City Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez, the bill’s primary sponsor, said the Council was “making history” by passing the legislation.

“Fifty years down the line when our children look back at this moment, they will see a diverse coalition of advocates who came together to write a new chapter in New York City’s history by giving immigrant New Yorkers the power of the ballot,” he said.

The bill now heads to the desk of Mayor Bill de Blasio. Though he has raised questions in recent months about the bill’s legality, de Blasio has indicated he would sign it into law if approved by the Council.

At a City Hall rally prior to the Council vote, immigrants hailed the legislation as a means to “always be heard.”

“Today, I’m finally being seen, I’m finally being heard as part of the political process,” said Melissa John, a Bronx schoolteacher who was born in Trinidad and came to the U.S. two decades ago.

“I stand in front of my students constantly,” said John. “I say, ‘It’s important for everyone to honor your stories, it’s important for everyone to honor your voices.”

The new legislation would grant the municipal right to vote to over 800,000 residents.
Photo: Willam Alatriste | NYC Council

Immigrant advocates have called on the city to extend voting rights to non-citizens for as long as a decade. After Intro 1867 was introduced by Rodríguez in January 2020, advocates increased pressure on lawmakers to advance the bill, staging numerous rallies outside of City Hall throughout this year.

While other municipalities around the country, including cities in Maryland, Vermont and California, have granted voting rights to non-citizens, New York City becomes the largest municipality by far to pass such a law.

“Many other cities across the nation as well as abroad are watching this meeting today,” Rodríguez said as the Council prepared to vote on Intro 1867. “In one of the most diverse cities in the world, we need to ensure that there is adequate representation for all New Yorkers.”

The bill was not without opposition, as some Councilmembers argued at the stated meeting that the law’s 30-day residency provision was insufficient. “That person is a transient,” said City Councilmember Mark Gjonaj, who appealed to his colleagues to amend the bill to require green card holders to live in New York City for more than a year in order to vote.

In explaining her “no” vote, City Council Majority Leader Laurie Cumbo voiced concerns that the bill would weaken the political power of Black New Yorkers by “shifting the power dynamic.”

“I’ve never heard in this one discussion about how the African American voter is going to be impacted by this bill,” Cumbo said. “My concern is how the African American community will fare in a situation where our numbers are not amplified in any meaningful way.”

Murad Awawdeh, Executive Director of New York Immigration Coalition (NYIC), called the bill “the largest enfranchisement of New Yorkers in more than a century.”
Photo: Willam Alatriste | NYC Council

Rodríguez argued that green card holders should be allowed to vote on local leaders as they are paying taxes to the city. He also suggested that New York should act to counterbalance recent measures taken in other states to suppress the voting rights of immigrants and people of color.

“In a time where many states are passing voter suppression laws like we haven’t seen since the Jim Crow era, New York City must be seen as a shining example for other progressive cities to follow,” he said.

Murad Awawdeh, Executive Director of New York Immigration Coalition (NYIC), called the bill “the largest enfranchisement of New Yorkers in more than a century.”

“Today, we finally gave immigrant New Yorkers who raise their kids here, build our economy, and contribute to this vibrant city every single day a voice in their local democracy,” said Awawdeh. “This groundbreaking legislation gives nearly one million New Yorkers a voice in the issues we all care about; the quality of our schools, the safety of our streets, and countless other large and small ways the city government impacts our lives.”

City Council Majority Leader Laurie Cumbo voiced concerns about “shifting the power dynamic.” Photo: Willam Alatriste | NYC Council

“The time to give immigrant New Yorkers a voice in their municipal government is now. Whether it was building our city or working as essential workers during the Covid-19 pandemic, immigrants have contributed to the prosperity and growth of New York City. That is why I am proud to stand here as a leading sponsor along with Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez and the New York Immigration Coalition to finally see the passage of Intro 1867 to restore the right to vote for nearly a million of our immigrant neighbors,” said City Council Committee on Immigration Chair Carlos Menchaca. “Opponents of this bill are already fear-mongering and spreading false information that any immigrant can come here and vote. They are wrong. Under our legislation, only those who have work authorization and have some immigration status under federal law can vote in our local elections. These are individuals like Dreamers under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program who worked as essential healthcare workers during the pandemic or Haitian New Yorkers with Temporary Protective Status who work hard and pay taxes. The law and justice are on our side.”

“El momento es ahora” 

Proyecto de ley del Concejo otorga a los no ciudadanos el derecho a votar

Por Gregg McQueen

A las urnas.

“Hoy, finalmente me están viendo”, dijo la maestra Melissa John.

El Concejo de la ciudad de Nueva York aprobó, el 9 de diciembre, con mucho esfuerzo, una legislación que otorgaría a los no ciudadanos el derecho a votar en las elecciones municipales.

Conocido como Intro 1867, el proyecto de ley permitiría a los neoyorquinos con tarjetas de residencia o autorización de trabajo en los Estados Unidos emitir votos en las elecciones locales para alcalde, concejo municipal, presidente del condado, contralor y defensor público, siempre que hayan vivido en la ciudad durante al menos 30 días.

No se les permitiría votar en las elecciones federales ni estatales.

El concejal Ydanis Rodríguez habló antes de la votación del Concejo.
Foto: William Alatriste | Consejo de la ciudad de Nueva York

Se espera que impacte a más de 800,000 personas en la ciudad de Nueva York.

Luego de un animado debate sobre el proyecto de ley en su reunión planeada, el Concejo Municipal votó para aprobar la ley, con 33 concejales votando a favor, 14 en contra y dos abstenciones.

El concejal Ydanis Rodríguez, el patrocinador principal del proyecto de ley, dijo que el Concejo estaba “haciendo historia” al aprobar la legislación.

“Cincuenta años después, cuando nuestros hijos miren hacia atrás en este momento, verán una coalición diversa de defensores que se unieron para escribir un nuevo capítulo en la historia de la ciudad de Nueva York al darles a los inmigrantes neoyorquinos el poder del voto”, dijo.

El proyecto de ley ahora se dirige al escritorio del alcalde Bill de Blasio. Aunque ha planteado dudas en los últimos meses sobre la legalidad del proyecto de ley, de Blasio ha indicado que lo convertiría en ley si Concejo lo aprobaba.

En una manifestación en el Ayuntamiento antes de la votación del Concejo, los inmigrantes elogiaron la legislación como un medio para “ser escuchados siempre”.

“Hoy, finalmente, soy vista, finalmente me escuchan como parte del proceso político”, dijo Melissa John, una maestra de escuela del Bronx que nació en Trinidad y llegó a los Estados Unidos hace dos décadas.

La nueva legislación otorgaría el derecho de voto municipal a más de 800.000 residentes.
Foto: William Alatriste | Consejo de la ciudad de Nueva York

“Me paro frente a mis estudiantes constantemente”, dijo John. “Les digo: es importante que todos honren sus historias, es importante que todos honren sus voces”.

Los defensores de los inmigrantes han pedido a la ciudad que amplíe los derechos de voto a los no ciudadanos durante una década. Después de que Rodríguez presentara Intro 1867 en enero de 2020, los defensores aumentaron la presión sobre los legisladores para que avanzaran en el proyecto de ley, organizando numerosas manifestaciones afuera del Ayuntamiento a lo largo de este año.

Mientras que otros municipios de todo el país, incluidas las ciudades de Maryland, Vermont y California, han otorgado derechos de voto a los no ciudadanos, la ciudad de Nueva York se convierte, por mucho, en el municipio más grande en aprobar una ley de este tipo.

“Muchas otras ciudades de la nación, así como del extranjero, están observando esta reunión hoy”, dijo Rodríguez mientras el Concejo se preparaba para votar Intro 1867. “En una de las ciudades más diversas del mundo, debemos asegurarnos de que haya suficiente representación para todos los neoyorquinos”.

El proyecto de ley no estuvo exento de oposición, ya que algunos concejales argumentaron en la reunión programada que la estipulación de residencia de 30 días de la ley era insuficiente. “Esa persona es transitoria”, dijo el concejal Mark Gjonaj, haciendo un llamado a sus colegas para enmendar el proyecto de ley para exigir que los titulares de tarjetas de residencia vivan en la ciudad de Nueva York durante más de un año para poder votar.

Murad Awawdeh, director ejecutivo de la Coalición de Inmigración de Nueva York (NYIC, por sus siglas en inglés), calificó el proyecto de ley como “la mayor concesión de derechos de voto a los neoyorquinos en más de un siglo”.
Foto: William Alatriste | Consejo de la ciudad de Nueva York

Al explicar su voto “no”, la líder de la mayoría del Concejo Municipal, Laurie Cumbo, expresó su preocupación de que el proyecto de ley debilitaría el poder político de los neoyorquinos negros al “cambiar la dinámica del poder”.

“Nunca escuché en esta discusión sobre cómo el votante afroamericano se verá afectado por este proyecto de ley”, dijo Cumbo. “Mi preocupación es cómo le irá a la comunidad afroamericana en una situación en la que nuestros números no se amplifican de manera significativa”.

Rodríguez argumentó que los titulares de tarjetas de residencia deberían poder votar por los líderes locales ya que pagan impuestos a la ciudad. También sugirió que Nueva York debería actuar para contrarrestar las recientes medidas tomadas en otros estados para suprimir los derechos de voto de los inmigrantes y las personas de color.

“En una época en la que muchos estados están aprobando leyes de supresión de votantes como no habíamos visto desde la era de Jim Crow, la ciudad de Nueva York debe ser vista como un ejemplo brillante a seguir por otras ciudades progresistas”, dijo.

La líder de la mayoría del Concejo Municipal, Laurie Cumbo, expresó su preocupación por “cambiar la dinámica del poder”.
Foto: William Alatriste | Consejo de la ciudad de Nueva York

Murad Awawdeh, director ejecutivo de la Coalición de Inmigración de Nueva York (NYIC, por sus siglas en inglés), calificó el proyecto de ley como “el mayor derecho al voto de los neoyorquinos en más de un siglo”.

“Hoy, finalmente les dimos a los inmigrantes neoyorquinos que crían a sus hijos aquí, construyen nuestra economía y contribuyen a esta vibrante ciudad todos los días, una voz en su democracia local”, dijo Awawdeh. “Esta innovadora legislación le da a casi un millón de neoyorquinos voz en los temas que a todos nos interesan: la calidad de nuestras escuelas, la seguridad de nuestras calles y un sinnúmero de otras formas grandes y pequeñas en las que el gobierno de la ciudad impacta nuestras vidas”.

“El momento de darles a los inmigrantes neoyorquinos una voz en su gobierno municipal es ahora”, dijo el concejal Carlos Menchaca.
Foto: William Alatriste | Consejo de la ciudad de Nueva York

“El momento de darles a los inmigrantes neoyorquinos voz en su gobierno municipal es ahora. Ya sea que estuvieran construyendo nuestra ciudad o siendo trabajadores esenciales durante la pandemia de Covid-19, los inmigrantes han contribuido a la prosperidad y al crecimiento de la ciudad de Nueva York. Es por eso que estoy orgulloso de estar aquí como patrocinador principal junto con el concejal Ydanis Rodríguez y la Coalición de Inmigración de Nueva York para finalmente ver la aprobación de Intro 1867 para restaurar el derecho al voto de casi un millón de nuestros vecinos inmigrantes”, dijo el presidente del Comité de Inmigración del Concejo Municipal, Carlos Menchaca. “Los opositores a este proyecto de ley ya están fomentando el miedo y difundiendo información falsa de que cualquier inmigrante puede venir aquí y votar. Están equivocados. Según nuestra legislación, solo quienes tienen autorización de trabajo y algún estatus migratorio bajo la ley federal pueden votar en nuestras elecciones locales. Estos son individuos como los Dreamers bajo el programa de Acción Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia (DACA, por sus siglas en inglés) que fueron trabajadores de atención médica esenciales durante la pandemia o neoyorquinos haitianos con estatus de protección temporal que trabajan duro y pagan impuestos. La ley y la justicia están de nuestro lado”.