Striking at Sunny Day
Piqueteando en Sunny Day

  • English
  • Español

Striking at Sunny Day

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

Car washers from Sunny Day Car Wash gathered to protest working conditions.

Car washers from Sunny Day Car Wash gathered to protest working conditions.

Things have not been too sunny at Sunny Day Car Wash for some time – but local residents and activists are hoping to change that.

Though gray skies threatened overhead this past Tues., Nov. 13th, it was more than just the weather that made for less than optimal conditions at the car wash on 135th Street and Lincoln Avenue.

While clouds hung heavy and low, the call for fair wages and safer working conditions that involved car wash workers, elected officials and activists who together rallied on Tuesday rang out high and clear.

Pedro Jiménez’s hands tell part of the story.

Jiménez works 12-hour shifts, and complains about the chemicals he must use to clean the cars.

“They sting,” he said.

Thick calluses on his hands form a second skin as a result of too much time spent dealing with heavy machinery.

Worker Pedro Jiménez’s calloused hands work 12-hour shifts.

Worker Pedro Jiménez’s calloused hands work 12-hour shifts.

The minimum wage in New York State is $7.25, but Jiménez and the other car wash staffers at Sunny Day Car Wash said they are only paid $5.50 per hour.

Worse, they said they haven’t been paid at all for the past three weeks.

On Sun., Nov. 10th, the frustrated workers refused to come to work until they were paid their wages, and by Monday they had been fired.

By Tuesday, the workers, who have begun organizing with Make the Road New York (MRNY) and the New York Community Coalition (NYCC), formed a picket line in front of Sunny Day Car Wash.

Others who have joined in the protest include New York State Senators Gustavo Rivera and José Serrano, who both appeared at the car wash on Fri., Nov. 16th.

Moreover, workers have voted to join the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU), which already represents 100,000 workers in the United States and Canada.

“We are demanding our rights,” said Jiménez.

“They sting,” said Jiménez of the chemical cleaners at Sunny Day.

“They sting,” said Jiménez of the chemical cleaners at Sunny Day.

He was joined by at least 20 of his co-workers as they carried signs and chanted slogans. They have three demands: they want the back wages they are owed; they want their jobs back; and they want the right to be represented by a union.

“We can only hope that this works,” said Jiménez with a weary smile.

Tuesday’s strike marks the first car washer strike in the history of New York City, said organizers.

As far as workers’ rights are concerned, the labor history of car washes seems to have been a dark one.

In 2008 survey of 84 car washes, state investigators reported $6.5 million in underpayments to 1,380 workers.

According to Larry Cary, a lawyer for the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU), who was present at the strike, a carwash in Los Angeles is only unionized carwash in the entire United States.

The strikers effectively kept nearly all cars from entering the wash, but one driver, Stephen Goldman, crossed the picket line in his car.

Driver Stephen Goldman is confronted before crossing picket line to wash his car.

Driver Stephen Goldman is confronted before crossing picket line to wash his car.

“Shame on you, shame on you,” yelled the workers, who said Goldman is a friend of the owner, a claim Goldman rejected.

“I own a body shop around the corner and I just want to wash my car,” he said.

He reasoned that perhaps Sandy might be to blame for the delayed checks.

Rocio Valerio González, an organizer for NYCC, staunchly rejected the theory.

“This is not the first time this has happened,” said González. “They’re using the same payroll company that pays me.”

The issues go beyond late checks.

The workers have reported incidents of tip-stealing, irregular or non-existent lunch hours, and bounced pay checks.

The workers seemed to make some form of headway mid-Monday, when the protesters who gathered that day each received a check.

If they do not bounce, the checks would only account for one of the three that are missing.

“We are going to organize other car wash workers,” said Larry Cary, a lawyer for the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union.

“We are going to organize other car wash workers,” said Larry Cary, a lawyer for the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union.

Alberto, who did not reveal his last name, is a newly employed worker at Sunny Day Car Wash. He said he was not aware of the labor issues when he started working, and was one of three employees seen working that day.

He said he was just a few days into the job, and had been unaware of the workers’ plight, but he is starting to experience some of it himself.

“I haven’t received any checks yet,” he said with a resigned shrug.

Cary told the workers that the union’s efforts won’t stop at Sunny Day Car Wash.

“We are going to organize other car wash workers,” he declared.

He told them that a complaint had been filed with the labor board regarding the workers’ pay and backed-up wages.

Car wash worker Bernardo Morales was skeptical that things will improve with the owner, whom none of the workers gathered said they had ever seen.

“We don’t even know his last name,” he said.

Organizer Rocio Valerio González said the missing checks were “not the first time this has happened.”

Organizer Rocio Valerio González said the missing checks were “not the first time this has happened.”

That last name is Roman, according to papers filed in Bronx Supreme Court this past week.

Frank Roman, identifying himself as owner of Sunny Day Car Wash, sought a temporary restraining order to keep the protestors 50 feet from the car wash. He and his lawyer argued that the picketers are hurting business and pose a safety concern.

But Judge Julia Rodríguez refused to schedule a hearing on the matter, and turned down the request for the restraining order. In her response, Judge Rodríguez said she could not legally get involved at this point in the labor dispute.

The workers on the picket line hadn’t yet decided what next steps will be in order should their demands be met, but said they would maintain unity.

“We talked about this and we will all decide together,” he said.

For now, that solidarity has led them back to the picket line at East 135th Street.

Worker Nelson Aquino was not getting his hopes up: “We’ll see.”

In the meantime, he fears that his landlord will threaten to evict him because his rent payments have been late.

“I hope things get better.”

Piqueteando en Sunny Day

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“Espero que las cosas mejoren”, dijo el empleado Nelson Aquino, quien teme el desalojo luego de atrasarse en sus pagos.

“Espero que las cosas mejoren”, dijo el empleado Nelson Aquino, quien teme el desalojo luego de atrasarse en sus pagos.

Las cosas no han estado tan soleadas para Sunny Day Car Wash por algún tiempo – pero los residentes y activistas locales esperan cambiar eso.

Aunque los cielos grises amenazaron este pasado martes, 13 de noviembre, fue mucho más que el tiempo lo que hizo menos óptimo las condiciones en el lavado de autos en la Calle 135 y la Avenida Lincoln.

Mientras las nubes colgaban pesadas y bajas, el llamado para salarios justos y condiciones de trabajo más seguras para los trabajadores de lavado de autos, se escuchó alto y claro el pasado martes cuando los oficiales electos y activistas reclamaban justicia.

Las manos de Pedro Jiménez cuentan parte de la historia.

Jiménez trabaja turnos de 12 horas, y se queja de los químicos que tiene que utilizar para limpiar los autos.

“Apestan”, dijo el.

Gruesos cayos en sus manos forman una segunda piel como resultado de demasiado tiempo pasado bregando con maquinaria fuerte.

Bernardo Morales muestra su apoyo a RWDSU, a la cual los lavadores de autos votaron para unirse.

Bernardo Morales muestra su apoyo a RWDSU, a la cual los lavadores de autos votaron para unirse.

El salario mínimo en el estado de Nueva York es de $7.25, pero Jiménez y los otros empleados de Sunny Day Car Wash dijeron que solo se les paga $5.50 la hora.

Peor, dijeron que no se les ha pagado nada durante las últimas tres semanas.

El domingo, 11 de noviembre, los frustrados empleados rehusaron ir a trabajar hasta que les pagaran sus salarios, y para el lunes habían sido despedidos.

Para el martes, los empleados, quienes habían comenzado a organizarse con ‘Make the Road New York’ (MRNY) y la Coalición Comunal de Nueva York (NYCC, por sus siglas en inglés), formaron una línea de piquete al frente de Sunny Day Car Cash.

Otros que se unieron al piquete fueron los Senadores del estado de Nueva York Gustavo Rivera y José Serrano, quienes se aparecieron en el lavado de autos el viernes, 16 de noviembre.

Sin embargo, los empleados votaron para unirse a ‘Retail, Wholesale and Departament Store Union’ (RWDSU), la cual ya representa 100,000 trabajadores en los Estados Unidos y Canadá. “Estamos exigiendo nuestros derechos”, dijo Jimenez.

Rocío Valerio González, organizadora, dijo sobre los cheques que faltan que “no era la primera vez que esto sucedía”.

Rocío Valerio González, organizadora, dijo sobre los cheques que faltan que “no era la primera vez que esto sucedía”.

Se le unieron por lo menos 20 de sus compañeros de trabajo mientras cargaban letreros y coreaban consignas. Tienen tres demandas: quieren el salario que le deben; quieren sus trabajos de vuelta; y quieren el derecho de ser representados por una unión.

“Solo esperamos que esto funcione”, dijo Jiménez con una cansada sonrisa.
La huelga del martes marca la primera huelga de lavadores de autos en la historia de la ciudad de Nueva York, dijeron los organizadores.

En lo que se refiere a los derechos de los trabajadores, la historia laboral de los lavadores de autos parece haber sido una oscura.

En el 2008 una encuesta de 84 lavados de autos, reportó $6.5 millones en pagos insuficientes a 1,380 empleados.

Según Larry Cary, abogado de ‘Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union’ (RWDSU), quien estaba presente en la huelga, la industria de lavado de auto en Los Angeles es la única sindicalizada en todos los Estados Unidos.

Los huelguistas mantuvieron a casi todos los autos de entrar al lavado, pero un conductor, Stephen Goldman, cruzó la línea de piquete con su auto.

“Vamos a organizar a otros empleados de lavados de autos”, dijo Larry Carry, abogado de ‘Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union’.

“Vamos a organizar a otros empleados de lavados de autos”, dijo Larry Carry, abogado de ‘Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union’.

“Vergüenza te debe dar, vergüenza te debe dar”, gritaban los empleados, quienes dijeron que Goldman era amigo del dueño, un reclamo que Goldman rechazó.

“Soy dueño de una carrocería en la esquina y solo deseo lavar mi auto”, dijo.

Razonó que a lo mejor Sandy podría ser la causa de los cheques retrasados.
Rocío Valerio González, organizadora de NYCC, rechazó la teoría firmemente.

“Esta no es la primera vez que esto sucede”, dijo González. “Ellos utilizan la misma compañía de nómina que me paga a mi”.

El problema va mucho más allá de los cheques.

Los empleados han reportado incidentes de la roba de propinas, horas de almuerzo irregulares o no existentes, y cheques rebotados.

Los empleados parecen haber hecho alguna clase de progreso a mediados del lunes, cuando los protestantes que se reunieron ese día recibieron un cheque.

Si no rebotan, los cheques solo cubren una semana de las tres pendientes.

El conductor Stephen Goldman es confrontado por los protestantes por cruzar la línea de piquete para lavar su auto.

El conductor Stephen Goldman es confrontado por los protestantes por cruzar la línea de piquete para lavar su auto.

Alberto, quien no reveló su apellido, es un recién empleado en Sunny Day Car Wash. Dijo que no sabía de los problemas laborales cuando comenzó a trabajar y era uno de los tres empleados trabajando ese día.

Dijo que solo llevaba algunos días en el trabajo, y que no sabía de las cuestiones laborales, pero ha comenzado a sentir algunas.

“Todavía no he recibido ningún cheque”, dijo con un resignado encogimiento de hombros.

Cary les dijo a los empleados que los esfuerzos de la unión no pararán en Sunny Day Car Wash. “Vamos a organizar a otros empleados de lavados de auto”, declaró.

Les dijo que se había presentado una queja con la junta laboral referente a la paga de los empleados y salarios atrasados.

Bernardo Morales, empleado, estaba escéptico de que las cosas mejorarían con el dueño, al que ninguno de los empleados reunidos dijeron haber visto.

“Ni siquiera sabemos su apellido”, dijo el.

“Apestan”, dijo el empleado Pedro Jiménez de los limpiadores químicos en Sunny Day.

“Apestan”, dijo el empleado Pedro Jiménez de los limpiadores químicos en Sunny Day.

Su apellido es Román, según papeles entregados en la Corte Suprema del Bronx esta pasada semana. Frank Román, identificado como dueño de Sunny Day Car Wash, buscó una orden de restricción temporera para mantener a los manifestantes a 50 pies de su negocio. El y su abogado argumentaron que los protestantes están dañando el negocio y plantean una preocupación de seguridad.

Pero la jueza Julia Rodríguez rehusó programar una vista en el asunto, y rechazó la petición de la orden de restricción. En su declaración, el juez Rodríguez dijo que ella no podía envolverse legalmente en este momento de la disputa laboral.

Los empleados todavía no han decidido cuales serán los próximos pasos para que sus demandas sean cumplidas, pero dijeron que se mantendrán unidos.

“Nosotros hablamos acerca de esto y todos decidiremos juntos”, dijo el.

Por ahora, esa solidaridad los ha llevado de vuelta a la línea de piquete en el este de la Calle 135.

El empleado Nelson Aquino no tenía muchas esperanzas: “Veremos”.

Mientras tanto, teme que el dueño de su apartamento lo desaloje porque sus pagos de renta han estado tarde”.

“Espero que las cosas mejoren”.