Reversing the pipeline
Invirtiendo la tendencia

  • English
  • Español

Reversing the pipeline

Story and photos by Madeleine Cummings

“Without high school diplomas and without college, people won’t have access to jobs that will sustain them,” said NYREN member John Gordon at the Talking Transition event.

“Without high school diplomas and without college, people won’t have access to jobs that will sustain them,” said NYREN member John Gordon at the Talking Transition event.

The New York Reentry Education Network (NYREN) outlined its vision for expanding the city’s prison education programs this past Wed., Nov. 27th, sharing seven policy recommendations for mayor-elect Bill de Blasio and his transition team at a Talking Transition event.

The forum, titled “Educate Don’t Incarcerate: Reversing the School to Prison Pipeline,” was organized by, among others, members of the Education from the Inside Out Coalition, Columbia’s Center for Institutional and Social Change, and John Jay College’s Prisoner Reentry Institute.

All gathered to present the recommendations, which include improving access to higher education for older inmates and making college and career centers available to prisoners on Rikers Island.

“We believe that without high school diplomas and without college, that people won’t have access to jobs that will sustain them and their families over the rest of their lives,” said NYREN member John Gordon.

Cheryl Wilkins said the bachelor’s degree she earned in prison helped her find employment after she was released.

Cheryl Wilkins said the bachelor’s degree she earned in prison helped her find employment after she was released.

NYREN was founded in 2009 to strategize about increasing access to education for New Yorkers involved in the criminal justice system. It has grown into a coalition of 25 community-based organizations, government agencies, and higher education institutions. It calls for making education a central component of reentry policy and practice as a cost-effective way to rebuild lives, reduce recidivism, and make communities safer.

More access to education, the network believes, leads to more employment opportunities for those released and fewer tax dollars spent on locking up repeat offenders.

A recent RAND Corporation report, which argued that correctional education programs can be cost-effective, found that, on average, inmates involved in correctional education programs had 43% lower odds of recidivating than those who were not involved in those programs.

Johnny Pérez was twenty-one years old when he was convicted and sentenced to 15 years in prison.

He told a packed audience that by the time he landed in jail, he had not graduated high school. He couldn’t finish a book. He couldn’t name the capital of New York State. That changed after he signed up for a college program, which sparked a passion for learning and improving himself.

Volunteer Alex Manning urged attendees to record videos on the issue.

Volunteer Alex Manning urged attendees to record videos on the issue.

“I came to see opportunities where before I only saw obstacles,” he said. “I came to see stepping stones where before I only saw challenges. I came to see things in the world that I had never saw before, although they’d been in front of me my entire life.”

The more Pérez learned, the more he wanted to learn.

But in prison, he said, where “the only thing that is guaranteed is constant disappointment,” he faced a stream of class cancellations due to staff and funding shortages.

“It’s so important that Mr. de Blasio and his transition team not only support and allocate funds for supporting the special population but also create permanent, effective policy changes to help increase opportunities for people with criminal convictions.”

Cheryl Wilkins said the bachelor’s degree she earned in prison helped her find employment after she was released. So convinced by the transformative power of education, she started working for College Initiative, a New York City organization that helps men and women with criminal histories attend college.

Audience member Mark Bodrick is the Coordinator of Bronx Community College's Future Now program.

Audience member Mark Bodrick is the Coordinator of Bronx Community College’s Future Now program.

Cheryl’s story – one of triumph and self-discovery, but also of discrimination – was one of many brought to life during a series of tableaus and skits performed by members of College and Community Fellowship’s Theater for Social Change.

Playing herself, Wilkins sat through a job interview during which her perfect grades were glossed over but her criminal history brought up again and again.

Ninozca Núñez, who studies business and law at Bronx Community College, called the event “inspirational.” Though never incarcerated herself, Núñez said that hearing the speakers’ stories helped her better understand friends and classmates who had experienced the prison system.

Organizers Yasmin Safdie and Tammy Arnstein explained that event was the first of its kind for NYREN.

“The turnout was amazing and we had a lot of youth in the room who were directly impacted by the issue,” Safdie said. “Because it’s most important that they’re here, and speaking up, and giving policy recommendations.”

Stacy Soria, Program Manager at The Doe Fund.

Stacy Soria, Program Manager at The Doe Fund.

Arnstein said the storytelling structure was used to focus on how people are personally transformed by education policies.

“We wanted to show that policies do matter, but that there are human beings on the other side of them,” she said.

Arnstein, who works as a researcher for Columbia Law School’s Center for Institutional and Social Change, said she was touched by each of the speakers’ stories and could feel the passion in the room.

“I felt that I saw that in the audience as well,” she said.

De Blasio campaigned with the promise of expanding alternatives to incarceration, especially for juvenile defenders. He also said that he would support legislation that requires private employers to consider job applicants’ full range of skills. (Many currently disqualify job candidates with criminal records outright).

Talking Transition, the two-week-long discussion space for the future of city politics, was installed by a group of foundations – not the mayor’s office. De Blasio, who has visited the tent, was not in attendance on Wednesday night.

“Absolutely our next step is: how do we get these seven policy recommendations to the mayor,” Arnstein said.

For more information, please visit www.reentryeducationnetwork.org.

Invirtiendo la tendencia

Historia y fotos por Madeleine Cummings

“Without high school diplomas and without college, people won’t have access to jobs that will sustain them,” said NYREN member John Gordon at the Talking Transition event.

“Sin diploma de escuela secundaria y sin estudios universitarios, la gente no tendrá acceso a puestos de trabajo que los mantengan”, dijo John Gordon, miembro de NYREN, en el evento Talking Transition.

La Red de Educación de Reingreso de Nueva York (NYREN por sus siglas en inglés), describió su visión para la expansión de los programas de educación de la prisión de la ciudad el pasado miércoles 27 de noviembre, y compartió siete recomendaciones de políticas con el alcalde electo Bill de Blasio y su equipo de transición, en el evento Talking Transition.

El foro, titulado “Educate Don’t Incarcerate: Reversing the School to Prison Pipeline” (Educar no encarcelar: invirtiendo el camino de la escuela a la cárcel), fue organizado por, entre otros, miembros de la Coalición Education from the Inside Out, el Centro de Columbia para el cambio Institucional y Social, y el John Jay College Prisoner Reentry Institute.

Todos se reunieron para presentar las recomendaciones, que incluyen la mejora del acceso a la educación superior para los reclusos de mayor edad y hacer que los centros universitarios y profesionales estén disponibles para los presos en Rikers Island.

Cheryl Wilkins said the bachelor’s degree she earned in prison helped her find employment after she was released.

Cheryl Wilkins dijo que la licenciatura que obtuvo en la cárcel la ayudó a encontrar un empleo después de haber sido liberada.

“Creemos que sin diploma de escuela secundaria y sin estudios universitarios, la gente no tendrá acceso a puestos de trabajo que los sostengan a ellos y a sus familias durante el resto de sus vidas”, dijo el miembro de NYREN, John Gordon.

NYREN fue fundada en 2009 para crear una estrategia para el aumento del acceso a la educación para los neoyorquinos involucrados en el sistema de justicia penal. Se ha convertido en una coalición de 25 organizaciones comunitarias, agencias gubernamentales e instituciones de educación superior. Exige hacer de la educación un componente central de la política y la práctica de reingreso, la ve como una manera rentable para reconstruir vidas, reducir la reincidencia y hacer las comunidades más seguras.

La red considera que un mayor acceso a la educación, conduce a más oportunidades de empleo para las personas liberadas, además se gasta menos dinero de los impuestos para encerrar a los delincuentes reincidentes.

Un informe reciente de la Corporación RAND, que argumenta que los programas de educación correccional pueden ser rentables, encontró que, en promedio, los internos que participan en los programas de educación correccional presentaron una probabilidad 43% menor de reincidencia que aquellos que no se involucran en los programas.

Volunteer Alex Manning urged attendees to record videos on the issue.

El voluntario Alex Manning instó a los asistentes a grabar videos sobre el tema.

Johnny Pérez tenía veintiún años de edad cuando fue declarado culpable y condenado a 15 años de prisión.

Le dijo a un auditorio repleto que cuando llegó a la cárcel, no se había graduado de la escuela secundaria, no había podido terminar un libro, no podía nombrar la capital del estado de Nueva York. Eso cambió después de que se inscribió en un programa universitario, lo que desató una pasión por el aprendizaje y la mejora de sí mismo.

“Vine a ver oportunidades donde antes sólo vi obstáculos”, dijo. “Vine a ver escalones donde antes sólo vi desafíos. Ahora veo las cosas en el mundo que nunca había visto antes, aunque habían estado delante de mí toda la vida”.

Cuanto más aprendía Pérez, más quería aprender.

Pero en la cárcel, dijo, donde “lo único que está garantizado es la decepción constante”, se enfrentó a una corriente de cancelaciones de clases debido a la escasez de personal y de financiamiento.

Stacy Soria, Program Manager at The Doe Fund.

Stacy Soria, Gerente del Programa en The Doe Fund.

“Es muy importante que el señor de Blasio y su equipo de transición no sólo apoyen y asignen fondos para apoyar a la población penal, sino también generar cambios permanentes de políticas eficaces para ayudar a aumentar las oportunidades para las personas con antecedentes penales”.

Cheryl Wilkins dijo que la licenciatura que obtuvo en la cárcel la ayudó a encontrar un empleo después de haber sido puesta en libertad. Así, convencida por el poder transformador de la educación, comenzó a trabajar para el College Initiative, una organización de la ciudad de Nueva York que ayuda a hombres y mujeres con antecedentes penales a asistir a la universidad.

La historia de Cheryl, una de triunfo y de auto-descubrimiento, pero también de discriminación, fue una de muchas llevadas a la vida durante una serie de retablos y obras de teatro realizadas por los miembros del Colegio y Teatro comunitario de Becas para el Cambio Social.

Representándose a sí misma, Wilkins se sentó durante una entrevista de trabajo en la que sus calificaciones perfectas fueron pasadas por alto pero su historia criminal salió una y otra vez.

Ninozca Núñez, quien estudia economía y derecho en el Bronx Community College, llamó al evento “inspirador”. Aunque nunca ha estado encarcelada, dijo Núñez que escuchar las historias de los oradores le ayudó a comprender mejor a los amigos y compañeros de clase que habían sufrido el sistema penitenciario.

"Queríamos mostrar que las políticas son importantes, pero que existen seres humanos al otro lado de ellas", dijo la organizadora Tammy Arnstein.

“Queríamos mostrar que las políticas son importantes, pero que existen seres humanos al otro lado de ellas”, dijo la organizadora Tammy Arnstein.

Los organizadores Yasmin Safdie y Tammy Arnstein explicaron que el evento fue el primero de su tipo para NYREN.

“La participación fue increíble y tuvimos una gran cantidad de jóvenes en la sala que se vieron afectados directamente por el tema”, dijo Safdie. “Debido a que es más importante que estén aquí,  hablen, y den recomendaciones para la creación de políticas”.

Arnstein dijo que la estructura de narración se utilizó para centrarse en cómo las personas se transforman personalmente por las políticas educativas.

“Queríamos mostrar que las políticas son importantes, pero que existen seres humanos en el otro lado de ellas”, dijo.

Arnstein, quien trabaja como investigadora en el Centro de la Escuela de Derecho Columbia para el cambio Institucional y Social, dijo haberse sentido conmovida por cada una de las historias de los oradores y podía sentir la pasión en la sala.

“Sentí que vi eso en la audiencia también”, dijo.

De Blasio hizo campaña con la promesa de ampliar las alternativas al encarcelamiento, especialmente para los defensores juveniles. También dijo que apoyaría una legislación que obligue a los empleadores privados a considerar toda la variedad de habilidades de los solicitantes de empleo. (Muchos actualmente descalifican a candidatos con antecedentes penales).

Talking Transition, el espacio de debate de dos semanas de duración para el futuro de las políticas de la ciudad, fue instalado por un grupo de fundaciones, no la oficina del alcalde. De Blasio, quien ha visitado la carpa, no estuvo presente la noche del miércoles.

“Absolutamente nuestro siguiente paso es: ¿cómo podemos hacerle llegar estas siete recomendaciones de políticas al alcalde?”, dijo Arnstein.

Para mayor información por favor visite www.reentryeducationnetwork.org.