LocalNewsPolitics/government

Reform and record
Un llamado para cambio en interrogaciones

Reform and record

Making the case on restructuring interrogations

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen


"I spent 27 years in jail for a crime I did not commit," said Shabaka Shakur.
“I spent 27 years in jail for a crime I did not commit,” said Shabaka Shakur.

Raymond Santana lost seven years of his life in prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

He’s now looking to ensure that other innocent people don’t suffer the same fate.

One of the “Central Park Five” who were wrongly convicted in the 1989 rape and beating of a Central Park jogger, Santana was at City Hall on April 6 to back state legislation meant to prevent wrongful convictions.

Santana said he is an example of what happens when the justice system goes wrong.
“We have paid the price and it’s been a heavy price,” he remarked.

The City Council is asking state lawmakers to pass a bill that would require police to implement eyewitness identification reform and record suspect interrogations from start to finish.

Supporters say the legislation would eliminate false or coerced confessions and misidentification of suspects.

“Wrongful convictions weaken our criminal justice system, steal years of life from innocent men and women, and prevent victims’ families from truly getting closure,” said Councilmember Vanessa Gibson, chair of the Council’s Public Safety committee. “It is unacceptable that false confessions and misidentifications continue to undermine the justice in our state and across the nation when law enforcement could easily implement reforms to reduce these life-altering errors.”

The case in 1989.
The case in 1989.

Gibson recently introduced Resolution 979, which proposes a state law to make police fully record all interrogations and to conduct lineups blindly, meaning that the police officer administering the lineup is unaware of the suspect’s identity or cannot see which person the eyewitness is viewing.

At City Hall, Gibson joined Santana, other wrongfully convicted New Yorkers and additional stakeholders in asking the state legislature to pass these reforms.

Recording of interrogations provides an objective record and deters leading or abusive behavior by police, said Rebecca Brown, Policy Director for the Innocence Project.

The non-profit organization was founded in 1992 by Barry C. Scheck and Peter J. Neufeld at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law at Yeshiva University.

While the New York Police Department (NYPD) said that they currently videotape all interrogations, there is no law that requires the department to do so.

The group gathered at City Hall.
The group gathered at City Hall.

“All interrogations need to be videotaped,” stated Brown. “That’s the only way to be sure that something wasn’t fabricated. And there has to be a law — it can’t be at the discretion of the police department or anyone else.”

“Had it been the law in 1989 in New York to record entire interrogations, we might not have been wrongfully convicted,” Santana said. “In our case, the public only saw a nice, neatly packaged confession, not the over 24 hours of interrogation, the threats and the coercion. We were told that we could go home as long as we confessed, so we said what we were told to say.”

Santana and four other men — Antron McCray, Yusef Salaam, Kevin Richardson and Kharey Wise — were convicted as teenagers in the Central Park jogger case.

“Wrongful convictions weaken our criminal justice system,” said Councilmember Vanessa Gibson.
“Wrongful convictions weaken our criminal justice system,” said Councilmember Vanessa Gibson.

Each spent six to 13 years in prison, but had their convictions overturned in 2002 after Matias Reyes, incarcerated for rape and murder, confessed to the crime and was linked by DNA evidence.

The “Central Park 5″ reached a $41 million settlement with the city in 2014.

In all, 29 convictions have been overturned in New York state by DNA evidence, said Brown.

“Fifteen involved eyewitness misidentification,” she explained. “An additional 14 involved false confession.”

Brown added that blind administration of photo lineups would prevent police officers from providing any intentional or unintentional cues which could influence a selection by a crime witness.

Shabaka Shakur was convicted of a double homicide in 1988 and spent nearly three decades in prison before a judge ordered him released in 2015, after ruling that there was a “reasonable probability” that his confession was fabricated by police.

Governor Andrew Cuomo included the reforms in his 2016 legislative agenda.
Governor Andrew Cuomo included the reforms in his 2016 legislative agenda.

“I spent 27 years in jail for a crime I did not commit,” remarked Shakur, who said that the detective working the case made up a false confession.

With crime rampant in New York City during the 1980’s, Shakur said he believes that there was a rush by law enforcement to put people in jail to make the public feel safer.

“We went through a period when the focus was a war on crime,” said Shakur. “And in creating that type of machine, a lot of people got swept up in it.”

Lonnie Soury, President of advocacy group FalseConfessions.org, said that wrongful convictions have an impact on the community at large, not just the imprisoned individual.

“For every wrongful conviction, the bad guys are still in our community committing crimes,” stated Soury. “Wrongful convictions are a public safety issue.”

Some version of interrogation reform has been bounced around the state legislature for almost a decade. Last year, the Senate approved a proposed bill, but it failed to pass in the waning days of the legislative session.

"All interrogations need to be videotaped,” said Rebecca Brown, Policy Director for the Innocence Project.
“All interrogations need to be videotaped,” said Rebecca Brown, Policy Director for the Innocence Project.

Earlier this year, Governor Andrew Cuomo included the reforms in his 2016 legislative agenda.

Nearly half the states in the nation require the recording of interrogations, and 15 states now employ the blind administration of lineups, said Brown.

Soury reported that NYPD officials recently met with him and other advocates for the legislation.

“They’ve assured us that they’ve begun to record interrogations,” Soury said. “But it’s still just their decision, there are no regulations. We’re calling on the NYPD to codify those regulations. They have made a good faith efforts.”

Gibson commented that buy-in from the police would help persuade state legislators to push through a reform bill.
“I think it would make a big difference and send a loud message to our colleagues in Albany to recognize how important this state law is,” she said.

For more information, please visit www.innocenceproject.org.

 

Un llamado para cambio en interrogaciones

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen


"It’s been a heavy price,” said Raymond Santana, one of the so-called “Central Park Five.”
“Ha sido un precio bien alto”, dijo Raymond Santana, Uno de los “Cinco de Central Park”.

Raymond Santana perdió siete años de su vida en prisión por un crimen que no cometió. Ahora, él está buscando asegurarse que otras personas inocentes no sufran la misma suerte.

Uno de los “Cinco de Central Park” que fueron condenados erróneamente en la violación y golpiza del 1989 de una corredora en el Parque Central, Santana estaba en la Alcaldía el 6 de abril para respaldar una legislación que pretende prevenir condenas erróneas. Santana dijo que él es un ejemplo de lo que sucede cuando el sistema judicial se equivoca.

“Hemos pagado el precio y ha sido un precio bien alto”, señaló.

El Concejo de la ciudad les está pidiendo a los legisladores que aprueben un proyecto de ley que requeriría que la policía implemente una reforma de identificación de testigo y grabe los interrogatorios del sospechoso de principio a fin.

Los seguidores dijeron que la legislación eliminaría confesiones falsas o coaccionadas e identificación errónea de los sospechosos.

“Las convicciones erróneas debilitan nuestro sistema de justicia criminal, le roba años de vida a un inocente y previene a las familias de las víctimas a cerrar ese capítulo en sus vidas”, dijo la Concejal Vanessa Gibson, presidenta del Comité de Seguridad Pública del Concejo. “Es inaceptable que confesiones falsas y malas identificaciones continúen socavando la justicia en nuestro estado y a lo largo de la nación cuando la ley fácilmente puede implementar reformas para reducir estos errores que cambian la vida”.

"All interrogations need to be videotaped,” said Rebecca Brown, Policy Director for the Innocence Project.
“Todas las interrogaciones tienen que ser grabadas”, dijo Rebecca Brown, directora de políticas para el Proyecto Inocente.

Recientemente Gibson introdujo la Resolución 979, la cual propone una ley estatal para hacer que la policía grabe completamente todas las interrogaciones y conducir alineaciones ciegas, lo que significa que el oficial de policía que administra el alineamiento no conoce la identidad del sospechoso o no puede ver que persona el testigo está viendo.

En la alcaldía, Gibson se unió a Santana, otros neoyorquinos condenados erróneamente y otros interesados en pedirle a la legislatura estatal el aprobar estas reformas.

El grabar las interrogaciones le provee un record objetivo y disuade un comportamiento abusivo por parte de la policía, dijo Rebecca Brown, directora de políticas para el Proyecto Inocente.

Aunque el Departamento de Policía de Nueva York dijo que actualmente ellos graban todas las interrogaciones, no hay ley que requiera que el departamento lo haga.

“Todas las interrogaciones tienen que ser grabadas”, señaló Brown. “Esa es la única manera de asegurarse que algo no fue fabricado. Y tiene que existir una ley – no puede ser a discreción del departamento de policía o cualquier otra persona”.

“De haber existido la ley de grabar las interrogaciones enteras en Nueva York en el 1989, quizás no hubiéramos sido condenados erróneamente”, dijo Santana. “En nuestro caso, el público solo vio una confesión bonita, bien empacada, no las más de 24 horas de interrogación, las amenazas y la coacción. Nos dijeron que nos podíamos ir a casa una vez confesáramos, así es que dijimos lo que nos dijeron que dijéramos”.

Governor Andrew Cuomo included the reforms in his 2016 legislative agenda.
El Gobernador Andrew Cuomo incluyó las reformas en su agenda legislativa del 2016.

Santana y otros cuatro hombres – Antron McCray, Yusef Salaam, Kevin Richardson y Kharey Wise – fueron condenados cuando eran adolescentes en el caso de la corredora del Parque Central.

Cada uno pasó de seis a trece años en prisión, pero sus condenas fueron anuladas en el 2002 luego de que Matias Reyes, encarcelado por violación y asesinato, confesó el crimen y fue vinculado con pruebas de ADN.

El “Central Park 5” llegó a un acuerdo de $41 millones con la ciudad en el 2014.

En total, 29 condenas han sido anuladas en el estado de Nueva York por evidencia de ADN, dijo Brown.

“Quince fueron con mala identificación del testigo”, explicó ella. “Otras 14 envolvieron falsa confesión”.

Brown añadió que un alineamiento de fotos a ciegas prevendría que oficiales de la policía suministraran cual señal ya sea intencional o sin intención la cual pudiese influenciar la selección de un testigo del crimen.

Shabaka Shakur fue condenado por un doble homicidio en el 1988 y pasó casi tres décadas en prisión antes de que un juez ordenara su libertad en el 2015, luego de fallar que existía una “probabilidad razonable” de que esta confesión fuera fabricada por la policía.

“Wrongful convictions weaken our criminal justice system,” said Councilmember Vanessa Gibson.
“Las convicciones erróneas debilitan nuestro sistema de justicia criminal”, dijo la Concejal Vanessa Gibson.

“Pasé 27 años de mi vida en prisión por un crimen que no cometí”, señaló Shakur, quien dijo que el detective trabajando el caso hizo una falsa confesión.

Con el crimen rampante en la ciudad de Nueva York durante el 1980, Shakur dijo que pensaba que había una prisa por parte de la ley de poner personas en la cárcel para hacer sentir al público seguro.

“Pasamos por un periodo cuando el enfoque era una guerra contra el crimen”, dijo Shakur. “Y creando ese tipo de máquina, muchas personas fueron arrastradas en ella”.

Lonnie Soury, presiden del grupo de defensa FalseConfessions.org, dijo que las condenas injustas tienen un impacto en la comunidad en general, no solo el individuo encarcelado.

“Por cada condena errónea, los malos continúan en nuestra comunidad cometiendo crímenes”, señaló Soury. “Las condenas erróneas son un asunto de seguridad pública”.

Alguna versión de reformas en la interrogación ha estado discutidas por la legislatura por casi una década.

El año pasado, el Senado aprobó una ley, pero no pudo pasar en la sesión legislativa.

The group gathered at City Hall.
El grupo se reunió frente al Ayuntamiento.

A principios de este año, el Gobernador Andrew Cuomo incluyó las reformas en su agenda legislativa del 2016. Casi la mitad de los estados en la nación requieren la grabación de las interrogaciones, y 15 estados actualmente emplean la alineación a ciegas, dijo Brown.

Soury reportó que oficiales de NYPD recientemente se reunieron con él y otros defensores para la legislación.

“Ellos nos aseguran que comenzaron a grabar las interrogaciones”, dijo Soury. “Pero sigue siendo su decisión, no hay regulaciones. Estamos haciendo un llamado a NYPD a codificar esas regulaciones. Ellos han hecho un gran esfuerzo de buena fe”.

Gibson comentó que la implicación por parte de la policía podría ayudar a persuadir a los legisladores a impulsar un proyecto de reforma.

“Pienso que haría una gran diferencia y enviaría un fuerte mensaje a nuestros colegas en Albany para reconocer cuán importante esta ley estatal es”, dijo ella.

Para más información favor de visitar www.innocenceproject.org.

 

 


Related Articles

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker