Private lives in public housing

Vidas privadas en viviendas públicas

Vidas privadas en viviendas públicas

  • English
  • Español

Private lives in public housing

We the People exhibit opens doors

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“This project is the product of being nosy, persistent and passionate,” said photojournalist Rico Washington.

“This project is the product of being nosy, persistent and passionate,” said photojournalist Rico Washington.

It might seem a bit of obscure trivia.

Still, the answer might surprise you.

What do Sonia Sotomayor, Jay-Z and and Jimmy Carter all have in common?

Not much, except the fact that they all lived in public housing – although President Carter did so for only a year.

Shino Yanagawa, a Japanese photographer who grew up in Tokyo, got her first impression of public housing from rap videos she saw on MTV.

As she described them, “They were dark and dangerous.”

As a result, Yanagawa had the impression that everyone who lived in the projects was a drug dealer or gangster.

And then, in 2004, she visited projects in Harlem herself when she moved to New York: “It totally changed my perspective.”

She realized that MTV had given her the wrong impression.

“The people were just normal people.”

We the People focuses on the lives of residents throughout New York City’s housing projects. Photo: Courtesy of We the People

We the People focuses on the lives of residents throughout New York City’s housing projects.
Photo: Courtesy of We the People

Yanagawa has done work for GQ and Harper’s Bazaar in Japan, among other projects. We the People: The Citizens of NYCHA in Photos + Words, a photojournalistic look at the past and present denizens of public housing that is currently on display at the Gordon Parks in the Bronx, offered her an altogether different terrain to explore.

The result was an intimate look into the lives of 50 New Yorkers from projects all throughout New York City.

We the People was conceived by Yanagawa and Rico Washington, a journalist who has interviewed the likes of Chris Rock, Erykah Badu and the late Bernie Mac.

Washington is a Washington D.C. native who grew up in the public housing.

As Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who grew up in the Bronxdale Houses (now renamed the Sonia Sotomayor Houses) was undergoing the confirmation process in 2009 to be appointed as the United States’ first Latina Supreme Court Justice, Washington was asking questions himself.

The national discussion that accompanied her nomination frustrated Washington. “There was a lot of focus on her socioeconomic background,” he said. “Her nomination yielded a lot of crazy concepts that people from these neighborhoods have nothing valuable to contribute.”

“Why is it that people have this concept that people from public housing are no good?” he asked himself.

Washington decided to channel his frustration creatively.

“It totally changed my perspective,” said artist Shino Yanagawa of her first visit to a city housing project.

“It totally changed my perspective,” said artist Shino Yanagawa of her first visit to a city housing project.

The project’s name, We the People, is inspired by the U.S. Constitution and the idea that all people are created equal—no matter where they hail from or live.

It “begs to question if Thomas Jefferson’s idyllic declaration that all men are created equal is in fact contingent upon variables such as ethnic and socioeconomic background,” as explained in the project’s mission.

We the People took over a year to finish, and led Yanagawa and Washington to housing projects all throughout the city until its completion in 2010.

They photographed the likes of artist Yasiin Bey (formerly known as Mos Def); Afrika Bambaataa, the godfather of hip-hop; activist and journalist Felipe Luciano; and Harlem’s honorary mayor, Queen Mother Dr. Delois N. Blakely.

Dashaun Simmons, We the People’s project coordinator, connected them to an initial group of subjects, but many others were discovered serendipitously as Washington and Yanagawa spent time in the city’s housing projects.

The New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), which manages public housing in New York City, serves about 176,327 families, approximately 403,357 authorized residents, and 345 developments throughout the city.

While Washington and Yanagawa did not visit every project, they made sure to include every borough.

“There was a lot of hanging out,” said Washington.

One of the exhibit’s subjects is hip-hop icon Afrika Bambaataa. <br><i>Photo: Courtesy of We the People</i>

One of the exhibit’s subjects is hip-hop icon Afrika Bambaataa.
Photo: Courtesy of We the People

“And a lot of free food,” smiled Yanagawa.

Each housing complex, as they explained it, had its own vibe.

“There are some communities where there’s a profound sense of togetherness,” said Washington. In such spaces, there was such a strong sense of trust that people kept their doors unlocked.

Yanagawa added that often those were the ones with community centers. “And there are other places where they didn’t let you onto the doormat,” noted Washington, “let alone keep their doors unlocked.”

While many of the subjects were photographed in the projects, others were captured in their new homes, at work, or at play.

Afrika Bambaataa, for instance, was photographed at his recording studio at City College.

His photograph, as conceived, was due to no small amount of ingenuity and persistence.

The Bambaataa shoot was originally difficult to arrange; the artist seemed largely unavailable after initial solicitations.

But Washington had previous footage of him on his phone, and after squeezing past other adoring fans and security detail after one of Bambataa’s shows, the photojournalist managed to show the footage to the artist.

Their connection was instantly solidified.

After that, the two were in touch and the shoot at City College was arranged.

We the People focuses on the lives of residents throughout New York City’s housing projects. Photo: Courtesy of We the People

We the People focuses on the lives of residents throughout New York City’s housing projects.
Photo: Courtesy of We the People

“This project is the product of being nosy, persistent and passionate,” laughed Washington.

Those same qualities have gotten Washington and Yanagawa very far—to Senegal, in fact.

With the help of one of their subjects, Queen Mother Dr. Delois N. Blakely, We the People made it to the World Festival of Black Arts and Culture in Senegal, which Washington calls the “black, international South by Southwest,” referencing the annual independent arts and culture festival held in Austin, Texas.

Just as a visit to the projects changed Yanagawa’s perspective, We the People affected the perspectives of many Senegalese who visited the exhibit.

Until then, for many, the only exposure to life in the projects had been through movies like Boyz in the Hood and New Jack City.

Washington and Yanagawa hope to further the project’s reach throughout the United States, but want to start first in New York City.

They are currently having discussions with NYCHA Chairman John Rhea to exhibit We The People at housing projects throughout New York City, and at community centers in public housing in each borough.

In the meantime, they note, “The objective of We The People is not to elicit pity or sympathy, but to challenge popular thought concerning these aforementioned neighborhoods. On the wings of sustainability, ingenuity and hope, [the project] is a testament to those who have weathered the storms from urban blight to urban renewal.”

We the People: The Citizens of NYCHA in Photos + Words is at the Gordon A. Parks Gallery at the College of New Rochelle’s School of New Resources John Cardinal O’Connor Campus on 332 East 149th Street in the Bronx until May 5th.

The gallery is open on Fridays from 2 p.m. – 6 p.m., and Saturdays from 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. To view by appointment, please call Delphine Hill-Smith at 718.665.1310.

For more information on We The People, visit www.debunkthemyth.org.

Vidas privadas en viviendas públicas

Nueva exhibición ‘Nosotros las Personas” abre camino

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer Podría

“This project is the product of being nosy, persistent and passionate,” said photojournalist Rico Washington.

“Este proyecto es el producto de ser entrometido, persistente y apasionado”, dijo Rico Washington.

parecer un poco de trivia obscura, pero la contestación podría sorprenderle.

¿Qué tienen en común Sonia Sotomayor, Jay-Z y Jimmy Carter?

No mucho, excepto el hecho de que todos vivieron en vivienda pública – aunque el Presidente Carter lo hizo solo por un año.

Shino Yanagawa, fotógrafa japonesa que creció en Tokio, tuvo su primera impresión de vivienda pública por unos videos de rap que vio en MTV.

Para ella, “eran oscuros y peligrosos”.

Como resultado, Yanagawa tuvo la impresión de que todo el que vivía en los proyectos eran traficantes de drogas o gangsters.

Entonces visitó unos proyectos en Harlem cuando se mudó a Nueva York en el 2004. “Cambio totalmente mi perspectiva”.

Se dio cuenta de que MTV le había dado una falsa impresión: “La gente era solo gente normal”.

We the People focuses on the lives of residents throughout New York La exhibición se enfoca en las vidas de los residentes en viviendas públicas. Photo: Courtesy of We the People

We the People focuses on the lives of residents throughout New York La exhibición se enfoca en las vidas de los residentes en viviendas públicas.
Photo: Courtesy of We the People

Yanagawa ha hecho trabajos para GQ y Harper’s Bazaar en Japón, entre otros proyectos.

Su trabajo en ‘We the People: The Citizens of NYCHA in Photos + Words’, una mirada fotoperiodística del pasado y presente de los moradores de vivienda pública que está actualmente en exhibición en el ‘Gordon Parks’ en el Bronx, le ofreció otro terreno para explorar.

El resultado fue una íntima mirada en las vidas de 60 neoyorquinos en viviendas pública a través de toda la ciudad de Nueva York.

Su colaborador en ‘We the People’, fue Rico Washington, periodista que ha entrevistado personas como Chris Rock, Erykah Badu y el fallecido Bernie Mac, es oriundo de Washington D.C. quien creció en vivienda públicas.

Washington fue inspirada para hacer el proyecto antes de que Sonia Sotomayor fuera nombrada a la Corte Suprema.

La discusión nacional que fue acompañada por su nominación frustró a Washington.

“Hubo mucho enfoque en su origen socioeconómico. Su nominación dio paso a muchos conceptos locos de que personas de estos vecindarios no tienen nada de valor para contribuir”, dijo Washington. “¿Por qué es que las personas tienen este concepto de que las personas de viviendas públicas no son buenas?”.

Washington decidió canalizar su coraje en un proyecto positivo.

El nombre del proyecto, ‘We the People’, es inspirado por la Constitución de los E.U. y la idea de que todas las personas son creadas igual – no importa de donde provienen o viven.’

“It totally changed my perspective,” said artist Shino Yanagawa of her first visit to a city housing project.

“Cambio totalmente mi perspectiva”, dijo la artista Shino Yanagawa.

El proyecto, completado en el 2010, le tomó un año y llevó a Yanagawa y Washington a proyectos de vivienda a través de toda la ciudad – fotografiando a conocidos como el artista Yasiin (conocido antes como Mos Def), Afrika Bambaataa, el padrino del Hip-Hop; periodista y activista Felipe Luciano; y la alcaldesa honoraria de Harlem, Queen Mother Dr. Delois N. Blakely.

Dashaun Simmons, coordinador del proyecto ‘We the People’, los conectó a un grupo inicial de asuntos, pero muchos otros fueron descubiertos casualmente cuando Washington y Yanagawa pasaron tiempo en los proyectos.

La Autoridad de Vivienda de la ciudad de Nueva York (NYCHA por sus siglas en inglés), que administra la vivienda pública en la ciudad de Nueva York, sirve cerca de 176,327 familias y aproximadamente 403,357 residentes autorizados y 345 desarrollos en toda la ciudad.

Washington y Yanagawa no pudieron visitar todos los proyectos, pero se aseguraron de incluir residentes de proyectos de los cinco condados.

“Pasamos mucho rato”, dijo Washington.

“Y mucha comida gratis”, sonrió Yanagawa.

Cada complejo de vivienda tenía su propio ambiente.

“Hay algunas comunidades donde hay un profundo sentido de fraternidad”, dijo Washington.

One of the exhibit’s subjects is hip-hop icon Afrika Bambaataa. <br><i>Photo: Courtesy of We the People</i>

Uno de los retratos es del icono de hip-hop Afrika Bambaataa.
Photo: Courtesy of We the People

En algunas comunidades, señaló, el sentido de confianza es tan grande que las personas mantenían sus puertas abiertas.

Yanagawa añadió que los proyectos que tienen el sentido de confianza más fuerte eran los que tenían centros comunales.

“Y hay otros lugares donde ni te abren la puerta”.

Aunque muchos de los temas fueron fotografiados en los proyectos, otros fueron capturados en sus nuevos hogares, en el trabajo o jugando.

Afrika Bambaataa, por ejemplo, fue fotografiada en su estudio de grabación en el ‘City College’.

Su retrato como fue concebido tomó mucho esfuerzo – y no una pequeña cantidad de ingenuidad y persistencia.

Por ejemplo, las fotos de Bambaataa fueron difíciles de arreglar; el artista parecía no estar disponible luego de las primeras solicitudes.

Pero Washington tenia imágenes anteriores de el en su teléfono, y luego de escabullirse delante de otros fanáticos y seguridad luego de uno de los espectáculos de Bambaataa, Washington pudo enseñarle las imágenes al artista.

La conexión se solidificó.

Luego de eso, los dos se mantuvieron en contacto y se arregló el rodaje en el ‘City College’.

We the People focuses on the lives of residents throughout New York City’s housing projects. Photo: Courtesy of We the People

We the People focuses on the lives of residents throughout New York La exhibición se enfoca en las vidas de los residentes en viviendas públicas.
Photo: Courtesy of We the People

“Este proyecto es el producto de ser entrometido, persistente y apasionado”, rió Washington. Esas mismas cualidades han llevado a Washington y a Yanagawa bien lejos – para Senegal, de hecho.

Con la ayuda de uno de sus temas, ‘Queen Mother Dr. Delois N. Blakely’, ‘We the People’ llegó a la Exhibición de Arte y Cultura en Senegal, la cual Washington llama “el negro, Sur Internacional por el Suroeste”, refiriéndose al festival anual independiente de artes y cultura llevado a cabo en Austin, Texas.

Tanto como una visita a los proyectos cambio la perspectiva de Yanagawa, ‘We the People’ logro cambiar la perspectiva de muchos ‘Senegalese’ que visitaron la exhibición.

Hasta ese entonces, para muchos, la única exposición a la vida en los proyectos había sido a través de películas como ‘Boyz in the Hood’ y ‘New Jack City’.

Washington y Yanagawa esperan ampliar el alcance del proyecto en los Estados Unidos, pero desean comenzar primero en la ciudad de Nueva York.

Actualmente están teniendo discusiones con John Rhea, presidente de NYCHA, para exhibir ‘We the People’ en proyectos de vivienda a través de la ciudad de Nueva York, y exhibirlo en los centros comunales de las viviendas públicas en cada condado.

Mientras tanto, ellos señalan: “El objetivo no es solicitar condolencia, sino desafiar el pensamiento popular. [El proyecto] es un testamento a ellos que han resistido a las tormentas del destrozo urbano y han logrado una renovación urbana.”

‘We the People: The Citizen of NYCHA in Photos + Words’ está en la Galería Gordon A. Parks en el Recinto de la Escuela de Nuevo Recursos John Cardinal O’Connor del Colegio New Rochelle en el 332 del Este de la Calle 149 hasta el 5 de mayo.

La galería está abierta los viernes de 2 p.m. a 6 p.m. y los sábados de 1 p.m. a 5 p.m. Para verla por cita, llame a Delphine Hill-Smith al 718.665.1310.

Para más información de We the People’, visite www.debunkthemyth.org.