EducationLocalNewsPolitics/government

“Parents are the first teachers”

“Los padres son los primeros maestros”

“Parents are the first teachers”

DOE roundtable focuses on UPK, ELL’s and engagement

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen


Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña‬ addressed UPK and other topics at a Department of Education (DOE) roundtable.
Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña‬ addressed UPK and other topics at a Department of Education (DOE) roundtable.

Though New York City public schools are preparing to let out for the summer, education remains an important topic for city residents, especially with universal pre-kindergarten (UPK) an essential part of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s agenda.

Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña addressed UPK and other topics at a Department of Education (DOE) roundtable held on Tues., June 10th at Tweed Courthouse in Manhattan.

Sponsored by the Center for Community and Ethnic Media(CCEM) at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the discussion gave community and ethnic media outlets, including The Manhattan Times and The Bronx Free Press, the opportunity for an intimate discussion with Chancellor Fariña and her colleagues.

During her remarks, the Schools Chancellor stressed that the DOE was mindful of the concerns of various ethnic communities and invited attendees to provide her office with feedback.

“Let us know when you see something bubbling up in your community,” she remarked.

Joining the Chancellor for the roundtable were fellow DOE officials Dr. Dorita Gibson, Senior Deputy Chancellor; Corinne Rello-Anselmi, Deputy Chancellor and Josh Wallack, Chief Strategy Officer.

"We're building on a foundation of comfort,” said Chief Strategy Officer Josh Wallack.
“We’re building on a foundation of comfort,” said Chief Strategy Officer Josh Wallack.

Gary Pierre-Pierre, Executive Director of CCEM, hosted the program.

The discussion focused heavily on the city’s heralded UPK expansion.

Just two weeks earlier, de Blasio had announced the addition of 10,400 new full-day seats in community-based organizations citywide.

Referencing her own childhood experience, the Chancellor said that UPK programs would benefit students in ethnic communities.

“My first language is not English, it’s Spanish,” she noted. “If I had an extra year of pre-k, that would have been a huge help in preparing me better for school.”

Fariña also said that the value of UPK goes far beyond education.

“Kids learn how to talk, play and share with each other,” she explained.

“The sooner they learn to do that, the better off they’ll be.”

To apply for a pre-k seat in a community-based organization, which the DOE also refers to as Community-Based Early Childhood Centers (CBECC), families can fill out a single application form and either submit it to the organization or mail it to the DOE.

The session was held at the Tweed Courthouse.
The session was held at the Tweed Courthouse.

The application can also be submitted online at schools.nyc.gov.

While open UPK seats are currently scare in the city’s public schools, Wallack said he is urging families to apply to the various CBECC options.

“These are organizations that you know and have a reputation for serving your communities,” he commented.

“We’re building on a foundation of comfort.”

Among the recently announced seats were about 500 in Manhattan, and 2,000 in the Bronx.

Some areas of the city, such as the South Bronx, benefited greatly from the CBECC expansion.

For example, in the Mott Haven and Port Morris neighborhoods, there are now 96 full-day UPK seats for every 100 four-year-olds, a higher ratio than much of the city, according to SchoolBook.org.

"We're looking to partner with parents,” said Deputy Chancellor Corinne Rello-Anselmi.
“We’re looking to partner with parents,” said Deputy Chancellor Corinne Rello-Anselmi.

Other areas of the city did not fare as well — in Manhattan’s Washington Heights neighborhood, there are only 35 pre-k seats for every 100 four-year-olds.

An additional 8,000 full-day UPK seats are expected to be announced later in the summer.

Amidst the mayor’s unveiling of the new UPK spaces came media reports that many of the community-based sites slated to offer UPK this September have open violations on file from the Department of Buildings (DOB), calling into question the safety of the venues.

Many of the sites with active building code infractions are located in the city’s poorer neighborhoods, including 95 in the Bronx.

In response to a query from The Manhattan Times/The Bronx Free Press, Wallack and Fariña said that the DOE is working to resolve all open violations.

Inspectors from multiple agencies, such as the DOB, FDNY and Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, are evaluating each site, and the agencies have increased staffing and resources to handle the violations issue.

“We will not have a site open in September unless it is fully ready and safe,” stated Wallack.

Gary Pierre-Pierre, Executive Director of the Center for Community and Ethnic Media, served as moderator.
Gary Pierre-Pierre, Executive Director of the Center for Community and Ethnic Media, served as moderator.

Fariña remarked, “Every school has to be safe enough for my own grandchildren to attend.”

With the new UPK program, the DOE plans to focus on the needs of English Language Learners (ELLs) — students who speak a language other than English at home and score below proficient on English assessments when they enter the school system.

“We’re looking to partner with parents, as they’re really the first teachers of the children,” said Rello-Anselmi.

“Parents must continue education in the home.”

The Chancellor also noted that the DOE intended to release new metrics to rate public schools, to replace the current letter grading system.

“I would say we’ll have some different metrics,” she said.

“The rollout will be at the beginning of September.”

Another topic Fariña touched on was the potential addition of Muslim holidays to the school calendar.

That discussion was ongoing among city officials, explained Fariña, who added that she wants schools to conduct more teaching about other cultures and their respective holidays.

“We’ll be reaching out to members of the community to help us with that,” she said.

For more details on enrolling in pre-kindergarten programs, go to www.nyc.gov/prek.

The online applications for pre-k seats in community-based organization can be found at schools.nyc.gov/ChoicesEnrollment/UPKApply.htm.

Families can also text “prek” or “escuela” to 877 877 or call 311 for information.

“Los padres son los primeros maestros”

Mesa redonda del DOE se enfoca en UPK, ELL y los compromisos

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen


Senior Deputy Chancellor Dr. Dorita Gibson.
La canciller adjunta senior, Dra. Dorita Gibson.

Aunque las escuelas públicas de la ciudad de Nueva York se están preparando para el receso durante el verano, la educación sigue siendo un tema importante para los residentes de la ciudad, especialmente con el pre jardín de infantes universal (UPK por sus siglas en inglés) como una parte esencial de la agenda del alcalde Bill de Blasio.

La canciller escolar Carmen Fariña abordó el tema de UPK y otros, en una mesa redonda del Departamento de Educación (DOE por sus siglas en inglés) celebrada el martes 10 de junio en Tweed Courthouse en Manhattan.

Patrocinada por el Centro para la Comunidad y Medios Étnicos (CCEM por sus siglas en inglés) en la Escuela de Periodismo de CUNY, la discusión brindó a canales comunitarios y medios de comunicación étnicos, incluyendo The Manhattan Times y The Bronx Free Press, la oportunidad de sostener una discusión íntima con la canciller Fariña y sus colegas.

Durante su discurso, la canciller de educación destacó que el DOE tuvo en cuenta las preocupaciones de varias comunidades étnicas e invitó a los asistentes a brindar a su oficina su retroalimentación.

“Háganos saber cuando vean algo burbujeando en su comunidad”, comentó.

Gary Pierre-Pierre, Executive Director of the Center for Community and Ethnic Media, served as moderator.
Gary Pierre-Pierre, director ejecutivo del Centro para la Comunidad y Medios Étnicos, fungió como moderador.

Junto a la canciller en la mesa redonda estuvieron sus compañeros funcionarios del DOE: Dra. Dorita Gibson, vicecanciller adjunta senior; Corinne Rello-Anselmi, vicecanciller adjunta y Josh Wallack, director de estrategia.

Gary Pierre-Pierre, director ejecutivo de CCEM, dirigió el programa.

El debate se centró en gran medida en la anunciada expansión de UPK en la ciudad.

Apenas dos semanas antes, de Blasio anunció la incorporación de 10,400 nuevas oportunidades de día completo en organizaciones basadas en la comunidad por toda la ciudad.

Haciendo referencia a su propia experiencia en la niñez, la Canciller dijo que los programas UPK beneficiarían a estudiantes en comunidades étnicas.

“Mi lengua materna no es el inglés, es el español”, señaló. “Si hubiera tenido un año adicional de pre-k, habría sido de gran ayuda para prepararme mejor para la escuela”.

Fariña también dijo que el valor de UPK va mucho más allá de la educación.

“Los niños aprenden a hablar, a jugar y a compartir con los demás”, explicó.

"We're looking to partner with parents,” said Deputy Chancellor Corinne Rello-Anselmi.
“Estamos buscando asociarnos con los padres”, dijo la vicecanciller adjunta Corinne Rello-Anselmi.

“Cuanto antes aprendan a hacer eso, mejor estarán”.

Para solicitar un lugar de pre-k en una organización comunitaria, a las que el DOE también se refiere como centros para la primera infancia basados ​​en la comunidad (CBECC por sus siglas en inglés), las familias pueden llenar un sencillo formulario de solicitud y enviarlo a la organización o por correo postal al DOE.

La solicitud también puede ser presentada en línea en schools.nyc.gov.

Si bien los lugares disponibles de UPK actualmente en las escuelas públicas de la ciudad son escasos, Wallack dijo que está instando a las familias para aplicar a las distintas opciones CBECC.

“Se trata de organizaciones que conocen y tienen una reputación de servir a sus comunidades”, comentó.

“Estamos construyendo sobre una base cómoda”.

Entre la diponibilidad recientemente anunciados hay unos 500en Manhattan y 2000 en el Bronx.

Algunas zonas de la ciudad, tales como el Sur del Bronx, se beneficiaron enormemente de la expansión CBECC.

The session was held at the Tweed Courthouse.
La sesión se llevó a cabo en Tweed Courthouse.

Por ejemplo, en los barrios de Mott Haven y Port Morris, en la actualidad hay 96 lugares UPK de día completo por cada 100 niños de cuatro años, una proporción más alta que en la mayor parte de la ciudad, de acuerdo con SchoolBook.org.

A otras zonas de la ciudad no les fue tan bien, en el barrio de Washington Heights de Manhattan, sólo hay 35 lugares pre-k por cada 100 niños de cuatro años de edad.

Se espera que otros 8,000 lugares UPK de día completo sean anunciados más adelante en el verano.

En medio de la inauguración del Alcalde de los nuevos espacios UPK, llegaron informaciones de que muchos de los sitios de base comunitaria programados para ofrecer UPK este mes de septiembre tienen violaciones abiertas en los archivos del Departamento de Edificios (DOB por sus siglas en inglés), poniendo en duda la seguridad de las sedes.

"We're building on a foundation of comfort,” said Chief Strategy Officer Josh Wallack.
“Estamos construyendo sobre una base cómoda”, dijo el director de estrategia, Josh Wallack.

Muchos de los sitios con infracciones activas del código de construcción están situados en los barrios más pobres de la ciudad, incluyendo 95 en el Bronx.

En respuesta a una pregunta de The Manhattan Times/The Bronx Free Press, Wallack y Fariña dijeron que el DOE está trabajando para resolver todas las violaciones abiertas.

Inspectores de múltiples agencias, tales como DOB, FDNY y el Departamento de Salud e Higiene Mental, están evaluando cada sitio, y las agencias han aumentado el personal y los recursos para manejar el tema de las violaciones.

“No vamos a tener un sitio abierto en septiembre a menos que esté completamente listo y sea seguro”, declaró Wallack.

Fariña comentó: “Cada escuela tiene que ser lo suficientemente segura para que mis propios nietos asistan”.

Con el nuevo programa de UPK, el DOE planea enfocarse en las necesidades de los estudiantes del idioma inglés (ELL por sus siglas en inglés), los estudiantes que hablan en casa un idioma que no sea inglés y tengan una puntuación en las evaluaciones de inglés por debajo del dominio cuando entran en el sistema escolar.

Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña‬ addressed UPK and other topics at a Department of Education (DOE) roundtable.
La canciller de escuelas Carmen Fariña abordó el tema del UPK y otros en una mesa redonda del Departamento de Educación (DOE por sus siglas en inglés).

“Estamos buscando asociarnos con los padres, ya que son realmente los primeros maestros de los niños”, dijo Rello-Anselmi.

“Los padres deben continuar su educación en el hogar”.

La Canciller también señaló que el DOE pretende lanzar nuevas métricas para evaluar las escuelas públicas y reemplazar el actual sistema de calificación por letra.

“Yo diría que vamos a tener algunas medidas diferentes”, dijo.

“La puesta en marcha será a principios de septiembre”.

Otro tema que Fariña tocó fue la posible adición de fiestas musulmanas en el calendario escolar.

Esa discusión fue constante entre los funcionarios de la ciudad, explicó Fariña, quien agregó que ella quiere que las escuelas den una mayor instrucción sobre otras culturas y sus respectivas fiestas.

“Vamos a estar comunicándonos con miembros de la comunidad para que nos ayuden con eso”, dijo.

Para más detalles sobre la inscripción en los programas de pre jardín de infantes, visite www.nyc.gov/prek.

Las solicitudes en línea para los lugares de pre-k en organizaciones de base comunitaria se pueden encontrar en schools.nyc.gov/ChoicesEnrollment/UPKApply.htm.

Las familias también pueden enviar un mensaje con el texto “prek” o “escuela” al 877 877 o llamar al 311 para obtener mayor información.

Related Articles

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker