“The virus is merciless”
“El virus es despiadado”

  • English
  • Español

“The virus is merciless”

Independent pharmacists on frontlines

By Gregg McQueen

“With the community pharmacy, there’s a bond,” said independent pharmacist José Cáseres, here with his team.

José Cáseres has seen COVID up close.

Cáseres, who was born in Cuba and grew up in Washington Heights, had people close to him fall victim to coronavirus.

“We have customers who have passed away,” he said. “These uptown communities were very hard hit by the pandemic.”

Cáseres, owner of City Drug & Surgical, which serves residents at two locations uptown, has been an independent pharmacist for 27 years. The virus took a tragic toll on his staff, as one of its pharmacists passed away due to COVID-19.

“He did not have an underlying condition, but the virus is relentless and he didn’t have a chance,” Cáseres said.
Several members of the staff also became sick with the virus.

The neighborhoods of Inwood and Washington Heights have consistently posted some of the highest rates of COVID-19 positivity.

“We were on the front lines. We didn’t close,” said Cáseres. “I got a lot of pressure from my family to do so. But I said no, I need to serve the community that’s been good to me and where I’ve grown up.”

About five miles away, in the Wakefield section of the Bronx, Ronnie Moore has also kept busy tending to local residents.

Community pharmacies are already active in offering shots for the flu, pneumococcal and shingles vaccines.

As of January 5, the neighborhood has a COVID-19 positivity rate over 18.2 percent ‒ the highest in all of New York City.

“It’s our priority to help people through this. If you look at COVID rates in certain neighborhoods, there’s a huge disparity,” said Moore, an independent pharmacist whose Allure Specialty Pharmacy site also stayed open through all of 2020.

“There is a history of poor health outcomes in these neighborhoods, a lot of underlying health conditions,” he stated. “We have access issues, health literacy issues.”

In the early days of the pandemic, Moore shifted from in-store visits to mostly home deliveries.

“We had to engage more delivery drivers. Many people couldn’t come to the store,” he recalled. “We’d try to sync people’s meds so they got one delivery for everything. It was similar to what the restaurant industry needed to do, delivery or takeout only.”

“People are looking for the vaccine and they should not have to wait,” said pharmacist Ronnie Moore.

After aiding customers through the past nine months, Cáseres and Moore are now both eager to help protect them against COVID-19 by administering the vaccine.

Both are members of the Pharmacists Society of the State of New York (PSSNY), a not-for-profit organization which advocates for the interests of 7000 independent pharmacists.

“It will be very important for the independent pharmacies to be able to provide vaccinations to immigrant and underserved communities,” said Cáseres. “These are people that we know and serve every day. There is a trust there; we speak their language.”

“With the community pharmacy, there’s a bond,” he stated.

Currently, New York state is providing the COVID-19 vaccine to health care workers, those connected with nursing homes and assisted living facilities, and essential workers. The group was recently expanded to include New Yorkers over 65.

While the state is formulating plans for additional distribution points including pharmacies, the timeline has yet to be announced.

“We’re waiting for Governor Cuomo to work out a protocol for independent pharmacists,” Cáseres said. “We’re ready to step up and get this mission accomplished.”

Allure Specialty Pharmacy is located in the same building as All Med Medical and Diagnostic Center. The Article 28 clinic is a state-certified diagnostic and treatment center. Moore said the center is slated to receive a shipment of COVID-19 vaccine in the near future in anticipation of vaccinating 200 acute care patients and 50 staff members.

“There’s a lot of red tape in terms of acquiring this vaccine. It was sent to facilities that weren’t necessarily using it. If we really want to get ahead of the pandemic, we need to reduce that,” Moore said. “Not all of these layers need to be put in place.”

On January 8, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced the expansion of the state’s vaccine distribution network to help accelerate rollout of the vaccine. While large chain pharmacies will be part of the expanded distribution network, independent pharmacies are not yet included.

“I think the rollout to independent pharmacies should be sped up,” Moore said. “It should be at the same time the chain pharmacies receive it, not after.”

“The chains are not always in the places where people need the vaccine. For example, a chain pharmacy recently closed in our neighborhood,” he added. “People are looking for the vaccine and they should not have to wait.”

“It’s important to educate,” said Moore (far right).

Cáseres pointed out that community pharmacies are already active in offering shots for the flu, pneumococcal and shingles vaccines.

“We already know what to do, how to do it and we have the staff trained,” he said. “We can do a great job of it. We already know our customers’ medical history and their prescription medication history.”

Caseres acknowledged that many of his customers have expressed concern about the vaccine’s safety.

“The first question they ask is, ‘Are you going to get it yourself?’ I say, ‘Absolutely’,” he said. “They want that affirmation from us that we believe in the vaccine and it will benefit them.”

To his high-risk patients, Cáseres stresses the importance of getting the vaccine as soon as they are eligible.

“I’ll tell them, ‘You’re over 65, you have asthma, you have diabetes – you need to get the vaccine. These are the patients that, for them, the virus is merciless,” he stated. “It’s going to help prevent a terrible outcome.”

After the first few months of the pandemic, City Drug & Surgical needed to reduce its hours for a time so its exhausted staff could rest, Cáseres said.

“It was draining early on,” he said. “But we made sure that everyone got their medication under very trying circumstances. The community appreciated it.”

In addition to onsite COVID testing, Moore said his pharmacy has conducted educational campaigns in the neighborhood regarding COVID-19, which include safety recommendations and encouragement for testing.

“Our technicians are also looking at their high-risk patients to let them know that they should be getting the vaccine when they can,” Moore said.

“It comes down to trust,” he remarked. “When people trust their healthcare provider, they’re more open-minded. I’ve had people say to me that they’d never get the flu vaccine, but you sit and tell them why it’s a good idea for them to do so. It’s important to educate.”

“El virus es despiadado”

Farmacéuticos independientes a la vanguardia

Por Gregg McQueen

“Estábamos en la primera línea”, dijo el farmacéutico independiente José Cáseres, aqui con su equipo.

José Cáseres ha visto la COVID de cerca.

Cáseres, quien nació en Cuba y creció en Washington Heights, tuvo personas cercanas a él que fueron víctimas del coronavirus.

“Tenemos clientes que han fallecido”, dijo. “Estas comunidades del Alto Manhattan se vieron muy afectadas por la pandemia”.

Cáseres, propietario de City Drug & Surgical, que atiende a residentes en dos ubicaciones en el Alto Manhattan, ha sido farmacéutico independiente durante 27 años. El virus cobró un precio trágico en su personal, ya que uno de sus farmacéuticos falleció debido a la COVID-19.

“No tenía una condición subyacente, pero el virus es implacable y no tuvo ninguna posibilidad”, dijo Cáseres.

Varios miembros del personal también se enfermaron con el virus.

Los vecindarios de Inwood y Washington Heights han registrado constantemente algunas de las tasas más altas de positividad de COVID-19.

“Estábamos en la primera línea. No cerramos”, dijo Cáseres. “Recibí mucha presión de mi familia para hacerlo. Pero dije que no, necesitaba servir a la comunidad que ha sido buena conmigo y en la que crecí”.

A unas cinco millas de distancia, en la sección Wakefield del Bronx, Ronnie Moore también se ha mantenido ocupado atendiendo a los residentes locales.

Las farmacias comunitarias ya ofrecen vacunas contra la gripe, el neumococo y el herpes zóster.

Hasta el 5 de enero, el vecindario muestra una tasa de positividad de COVID-19 superior al 18.2 por ciento, la más alta de toda la ciudad de Nueva York.

“Es nuestra prioridad ayudar a las personas a superar esto. Si se observan las tasas de COVID en ciertos vecindarios, hay una gran disparidad”, dijo Moore, un farmacéutico independiente cuyo sitio, Allure Specialty Pharmacy, también permaneció abierto durante todo el 2020. “Hay un historial de malos resultados de salud en estos vecindarios, muchas condiciones de salud subyacentes”, afirmó. “Tenemos problemas de acceso, problemas de conocimiento sobre temas de salud”.

En los primeros días de la pandemia, Moore pasó de visitas en la tienda a principalmente entregas a domicilio.

“Tuvimos que involucrar a más conductores de reparto. Mucha gente no podía venir a la tienda”, recordó. “Intentábamos sincronizar los medicamentos de las personas para que recibieran todo en una sola entrega. Era similar a lo que necesitaba hacer la industria de los restaurantes, a domicilio o solo para llevar”.

“La gente está buscando la vacuna y no debería tener que esperar”, dice el farmacéutico Ronnie Moore.

Después de ayudar a los clientes durante los últimos nueve meses, Cáseres y Moore ahora están ansiosos por ayudar a protegerlos contra la COVID-19 mediante la administración de la vacuna.

Ambos son miembros de la Sociedad de Farmacéuticos del estado de Nueva York (PSSNY, por sus siglas en inglés), una organización sin fines de lucro que defiende los intereses de 7,000 farmacéuticos independientes.

“Será muy importante para las farmacias independientes poder proporcionar vacunas a las comunidades inmigrantes y desatendidas”, dijo Cáseres. “Estas son personas a las que conocemos y a las que servimos todos los días. Existe confianza; hablamos su idioma”.

“Con la farmacia comunitaria, hay un vínculo”, afirmó.

Actualmente, el estado de Nueva York está proporcionando la vacuna COVID-19 a trabajadores de la salud, a quienes están conectados con hogares de ancianos e instalaciones de vida asistida, y a trabajadores esenciales. El grupo fue recientemente ampliado para incluir a neoyorquinos mayores de 65 años.

Si bien el estado está formulando planes para puntos adicionales de distribución, incluidas las farmacias, aún no se ha anunciado el cronograma.

“Estamos esperando que el gobernador Cuomo elabore un protocolo para farmacéuticos independientes”, dijo Cáseres. “Estamos listos para dar un paso adelante y lograr esta misión”.

Allure Specialty Pharmacy está ubicada en el mismo edificio que All Med Medical and Diagnostic Center. La clínica Article 28 es un centro de diagnóstico y tratamiento certificado por el estado. Moore dijo que el centro está programado para recibir un envío de la vacuna COVID-19 en un futuro cercano en previsión de vacunar a 200 pacientes de cuidados agudos y 50 miembros del personal.

“Hay mucha burocracia en la adquisición de esta vacuna. Fue enviada a instalaciones que no necesariamente la usaban. Si realmente queremos adelantarnos a la pandemia, debemos reducir eso”, dijo Moore. “No es necesario colocar todas estas capas”.

El 8 de enero, el gobernador Andrew Cuomo anunció la ampliación de la red de distribución de vacunas del estado para ayudar a acelerar el lanzamiento de la vacuna. Si bien las grandes cadenas de farmacias serán parte de la red de distribución ampliada, las farmacias independientes aún no están incluidas.

“Creo que debería acelerarse el lanzamiento en farmacias independientes”, dijo Moore. “Debe ser al mismo tiempo que las cadenas de farmacias la reciban, no después”.

“Las cadenas no siempre están en los lugares donde la gente necesita la vacuna. Por ejemplo, una cadena de farmacias cerró recientemente en nuestro barrio”, agregó. “La gente está buscando la vacuna y no debería tener que esperar”.

“Es importante educar”, dijo Moore (a la derecha extrema).

Cáseres señaló que las farmacias comunitarias ya ofrecen vacunas contra la gripe, el neumococo y el herpes zóster.

“Ya sabemos qué hacer, cómo hacerlo y tenemos al personal capacitado”, dijo. “Podemos hacer un gran trabajo. Ya conocemos el historial médico de nuestros clientes y su historial de medicamentos recetados”.

Cáseres reconoció que muchos de sus clientes han expresado preocupación por la seguridad de la vacuna.

“La primera pregunta que hacen es: ¿se van a vacunar ustedes?, yo respondo: absolutamente”, comentó. “Quieren esa afirmación de que creemos en la vacuna y les beneficiará”.

Con sus pacientes de alto riesgo, Cáseres enfatiza la importancia de recibir la vacuna tan pronto como sean elegibles.

“Les digo: tienes más de 65 años, tienes asma, tienes diabetes, necesitas la vacuna. Estos son los pacientes para los cuales el virus es despiadado”, afirmó. “Ayudará a prevenir un resultado terrible”.

Después de los primeros meses de la pandemia, City Drug & Surgical necesitó reducir sus horarios por un tiempo para que su exhausto personal pudiera descansar, dijo Cáseres.

“Fue agotador desde el principio”, dijo. “Pero nos aseguramos de que todos recibieran su medicación en circunstancias muy difíciles. La comunidad lo agradeció”.

Además de las pruebas de COVID en el lugar, Moore dijo que su farmacia ha realizado campañas educativas en el vecindario con respecto a la COVID-19, que incluyen recomendaciones de seguridad y fomentar las pruebas.

“Nuestros técnicos también revisan a sus pacientes de alto riesgo para hacerles saber que deben recibir la vacuna en cuanto puedan”, dijo Moore.

“Todo se reduce a la confianza”, comentó. “Cuando las personas confían en su proveedor de atención médica, tienen una mente más abierta. Algunas personas me han dicho que nunca se vacunarán contra la gripe, pero me siento con ellos y les digo por qué es una buena idea que lo hagan. Es importante educar”.