EducationHealthLocalNewsPublic Safety

More than parlor talk
Más que hablar

More than parlor talk

“I wanted to shoot for the stars.”

Though Gabrielle Jasmin had always aimed high, studying the skies wasn’t what interested her.

It was the idea of working in white that drove her.

TouroCOM student leaders (from left to right):  Rhoda Asimeng, Gabrielle Jasmin and Tatiana Carillo.
TouroCOM student leaders (from left to right):  Rhoda Asimeng, Gabrielle Jasmin and Tatiana Carillo.

Jasmin, a second-year medical student, earned a master’s in Interdisciplinary Studies in Biological and Physical Sciences at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM) before entering the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) program.

“I wanted to leave an imprint on the community,” she said. “I wanted to become a doctor.”

Experiencing the 2010 earthquake in Haiti in person while on a medical mission there cemented her determination.

“I had the privilege to witness firsthand what poverty really looks like.”

Jasmin, whose family immigrated from Haiti, is president of the Student Government Association and a mentor to high school students interested in medicine. Her family always emphasized the importance of education, particularly her mother, who worked as a home health aide.

“We want more,” said Touro President Dr. Alan Kadish (far left) of minority students, here with Geoffrey Eaton and TouroCOM Dean and Professor Robert B. Goldberg, DO.
“We want more,” said Touro President Dr. Alan Kadish (far left) of minority students, here with Geoffrey Eaton and TouroCOM Dean and Professor Robert B. Goldberg, DO.

Jasmin spoke at a recent gathering at the Harlem home of attorneys John Lynch and Sylvia Khatcherian on West 116th Street.

It was the school’s second official “parlor” – and attendees did more than chat.

Nearly $66,000 was raised to fund scholarships for underrepresented minorities attend TouroCOM. The donations bring the total proceeds raised for the TouroCOM Fund for Underrepresented Minority Students to approximately $160,000.

“These events give the medical school a chance to introduce our student leaders to Harlem,” explained TouroCOM’s Executive Dean Robert Goldberg, DO. “Their stories and life experiences point to the need for generous support for such dedicated people in order to meet the needs of underserved medical communities.”

Former Governor David Paterson served as event chair (left), here with Dr. John Palmer, Director of Community Affairs.
Former Governor David Paterson served as event chair (left), here with Dr. John Palmer, Director of Community Affairs.

Approximately 80 invited guests attended, including political, judicial, medical and civic leaders.

“We need your help to get more underrepresented minorities into TouroCOM, and to see that they graduate without crushing debt, so they come back into the community, work to improve public health, and make better role models and make us all better people,” said Touro President Dr. Alan Kadish.

Dr. Kadish said 37 percent of Touro’s approximately 18,000 students at its 29 campuses are underrepresented minorities, but, in his words, “We want more.”

Woody Pascal (left) and Civil Court Judge Franc Perry.
Woody Pascal (left) and Civil Court Judge Franc Perry.

Present too was second-year student Rhoda Asimeng, who is Vice President of Student Club Creating Osteopathic Minority Physicians who Achieve Scholastic Success (COMPASS); President of the Student National Medical Association (SNMA); and a mentor to younger students interested in pursuing medicine.

Her family traveled from Ghana – and her father came first with $28 in his pocket. He worked in the Meatpacking District until he was able to bring her mother and her six siblings to the U.S., where they shared a two bedroom apartment in the Bronx.

Asimeng said that scholarships were what allowed her to pursue academic success.

It was the school’s second official “parlor.”
It was the school’s second official “parlor.”

She said when her parents passed away by the time she finished college, she strived to be a good role model for her siblings, and has found the most satisfaction in her volunteer work in medical school as a mentor.

“My parents did not work [so] hard just for me to become a doctor,” she said. “It’s more than that. It’s [being] a person of influence. If I can help in some way, that would be amazing.”

“The only way to fight anything is to educate,” said Dr. Hemant Patel.
“The only way to fight anything is to educate,” said Dr. Hemant Patel.

Second-year student Tatiana Carillo, President of COMPASS and Vice President of the school’s Student Osteopathic Surgical Association (SOSA) chapter, shared stories of being raised by a single mom in the South Bronx, surrounded by drug addicts and prostitution.

Her family lived in a studio apartment with her grandmother, cousins and a sister.

She, too, made it through college on scholarships.

After medical school, she said she wants to return to her former neighborhood.

“I want to come back to my area and say, ‘I was you and I can help you. What can I do?’ That’s where my home is.”

In his remarks, President Kadish made reference to the mass shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina last month where nine people were killed, which is being investigated as a hate crime.

He said education is the key to eventually eradicating bigotry and racism – and other speakers agreed.

If I can help in some way, that would be amazing,” said second-year student Tatiana Carillo.
If I can help in some way, that would be amazing,” said second-year student Tatiana Carillo.

Former Governor David Paterson, who served as event chair and is a Distinguished Professor of Health Care and Public Policy at Touro, observed, “It is an honor to be part of an institution such as Touro, which has taken such an interest in making sure all the young people in the state get an education and that we start to fill in the areas that students are turning away from – science and technology and mathematics and other fields, and particularly medicine, where we do have a startling lack of doctors from African American and minority communities.”

A generous challenge donation was made during the evening by Dr. Hemant Patel, Director of Internal Medicine at TouroCOM’s Family Health Center, who recounted his family’s story of being forced to leave Uganda by the government of Idi Amin.

Patel grew up sharing a one-bedroom apartment in the Bronx with nine others across from Montefiore Hospital, dreaming one day he would work at the hospital.

“The only way to fight anything is to educate, educate and educate,” said Patel.

For more information, visit www.tourocom.touro.edu or call 646.981.4500.

 

Más que hablar 

If I can help in some way, that would be amazing,” said second-year student Tatiana Carillo.
“Si puedo ayudar de alguna manera, eso sería maravilloso”, dijo Tatiana Carillo, estudiante de segundo año.

“Yo deseaba llegar a las estrellas”.

Aunque Gabrielle Jasmin siempre ha apuntado alto, estudiar los cielos no era lo que le interesaba.

Era la idea de trabajar en blanco lo que la atraía.

Jasmin, estudiante de segundo año de medicina, obtuvo una maestría en Estudios Interdisciplinarios en Biología y Ciencias Físicas en el Colegio de Medicina Osteopática Touro (TouroCOM) antes de entrar al programa de Doctor de Medicina Osteopática.

“Deseaba dejar una marca en la comunidad”, dijo. “Deseaba ser doctora”.

Experimentando el terremoto de Haití en el 2010 en persona mientras estaba en una misión médica cimentó su determinación.

“Tuve el privilegio de ser testigo de cómo luce realmente la pobreza”

Jasmin, cuya familia emigró de Haití, es presidenta de la Asociación Gubernamental de Estudiantes y mentora de estudiantes de escuela superior interesados en la medicina. Dijo que su familia siempre enfatizó la importancia de la educación, particularmente su madre, quien trabajaba como ayudante de salud en el hogar.

Habló en una reciente reunión en la casa en Harlem de los abogados John Lynch y Sylvia Khatcherian en el Oeste de la Calle 116.

“The only way to fight anything is to educate,” said Dr. Hemant Patel.
“La única de manera de luchar contra algo, es educándose”, dijo el Dr. Hemant Patel.

Era la segunda reunión oficial de la escuela – y los asistentes hicieron mucho más que hablar.

Se recaudaron cerca de $66,000 para becas para minorías menos representadas asistiendo a Touro.COM. Las donaciones llevan a un total de aproximadamente $160,000 para los Fondos para Estudiantes Minoritarios Menos Representados en TouroCOM.

“Estos eventos le brindan a la escuela de medicina la oportunidad de introducir nuestros estudiantes lideres a Harlem”, explicó el Decano Ejecutivo Robert Goldberg, DO. “Sus historias y experiencias de vida señalan la necesidad de apoyo para esas personas dedicadas con el fin de satisfacer las necesidades médicas de comunidades menos representadas”.

Asistieron aproximadamente 80 invitados, incluyendo políticos, jueces, médicos y líderes cívicos.

“Necesitamos su ayuda para llevar más minorías menos representadas a Touro.COM y ver que se gradúan sin muchas deudas, para que así regresen a la comunidad, trabajen para mejorar la salud pública, y hacer mejores modelos a seguir y hacernos a todos mejores personas”, dijo el presidente de Touro el Dr. Alan Kadish.

El Dr. Kadish dijo que aproximadamente el 37 por ciento de los 18,000 estudiantes en sus 29 recintos son minorías menos representadas pero en sus palabras, “queremos más”.

También presente estaba la estudiante de segundo año Rhoda Asimeng, quien es vicepresidenta del Club de Estudiantes Creando Médicos Osteopatías de Minoría que Logran Éxito Académico (COMPASS, por sus siglas en inglés); presidenta de la Asociación Médica Nacional de Estudiantes (SNMA, por sus siglas en inglés) y mentora de jóvenes estudiantes siguiendo medicina.

Woody Pascal (left) and Civil Court Judge Franc Perry.
Woody Pascal (izq.) y el juez de la corte civil Franc Perry.

Su padre viajó desde Ghana – y llego con $28 en su bolsillo. Trabajó en el Distrito de Empaque de Carnes hasta que pudo traer a su madre y seis hermanos a los E.U., donde compartían un apartamento de dos habitaciones en el Bronx.

Asimeng dijo que las becas fueron las que le permitieron seguir su éxito académico.

Dijo que sus padres murieron para cuando ella terminó el colegio, busca ser un buen modelo para sus hermanos, y similarmente ha encontrado la mayor satisfacción en su trabajo voluntario en la escuela de medicina como mentora.

Former Governor David Paterson served as event chair (left), here with Dr. John Palmer, Director of Community Affairs.
El pasado gobernador David Paterson (izq.) sirvió como presidente del evento, aquí con el Dr. John Palmer, director de asuntos comunitarios.

“Es realmente maravillo”, dijo. “Mis padres no trabajaron tan fuerte solo para que yo me convirtiera en doctora. Es mucho más que eso. Es ser una persona de influencia. Si puedo ayudar de alguna manera, eso sería maravilloso”.

Tatiana Carillo, estudiante de segundo año, presidenta de COMPASS y vicepresidenta del capítulo de la Asociación Quirúrgica Osteopática de Estudiantes (SOSA, por sus siglas en inglés), compartió historias de ser criada por una madre soltera en el Sur del Bronx, rodeada de drogadictos y prostitutas.

Su familia vivía en un apartamento estudio con su abuela, primos y una hermana.

“We want more,” said Touro President Dr. Alan Kadish (far left) of minority students, here with Geoffrey Eaton and TouroCOM Dean and Professor Robert B. Goldberg, DO.
“Queremos más, dijo el presidente de Touro el Dr. Alan Kadish (izq.) de los estudiantes minoritarios; aquí está el con Geoffrey Eaton y decano y profesor Robert B. Goldberg, DO.

Ella también llegó al colegio por becas.

Luego de la escuela de medicina, dijo que desea regresar a su antiguo vecindario.

“Quiero regresar a mi área y decir, ‘yo era lo que ustedes son ahora y los puedo ayudar. ¿Qué puedo hacer? Ahí es donde está mi hogar.

En su discurso, el presidente Kadish hizo referencia a la multitud a la que le dispararon en la Iglesia Episcopal Metodista Emanuel African en Charleston, Carolina del Sur el mes pasado donde nueve personas fueron asesinadas, acción que está siendo investigado como un crimen de odio.

TouroCOM student leaders (from left to right):  Rhoda Asimeng, Gabrielle Jasmin and Tatiana Carillo.
Líderes estudiantiles de TouroCOM (de izq. a der): Rhoda Asimeng, Gabrielle Jasmin y Tatiana Carillo.

Dijo que la educación es la llave para eventualmente erradicar la intolerancia y el racismo – y otros oradores estuvieron de acuerdo.

El pasado gobernador David Paterson, quien sirvió como presidente del evento y es un Distinguido Profesor de Cuidado de la Salud y Política Pública en Touro, observó, “es un honor ser parte de una institución como Tauro, la cual se ha tomado el interés en asegurarse que todos los jóvenes en el estado reciban una educación y que comenzamos a entrenar en las áreas donde los estudiantes se alejan – ciencia y tecnología, matemáticas y otros campos, y particularmente la medicina, donde tenemos una falta de doctores afro americanos y miembros de comunidades minoritarias”.

Se hizo un generoso reto de donación durante la noche por el Dr. Heman Patel, Director de Medicina Interna en el Centro de Salud Familiar TouroCOM.

It was the school’s second official “parlor.”
Era la segunda reunión oficial de la escuela

Contó la historia de cómo su familia fue forzada a dejar Uganda por el gobierno de Idi Amin.

Patel creció compartiendo un apartamento de un cuarto dormitorio en el Bronx con otros nueve del Hospital Montefiore, soñando un día con poder trabajar en el hospital.

“La única de manera de luchar contra algo, es educándose, edúquese, edúquese”, dijo Patel.

Para más información favor de visitar www.tourocom.touro.edu o llamar al 646.981.4500.

Related Articles

Check Also
Close
Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker