Marching against a rule out of step

Marcha contra una norma desfasada

Marcha contra una norma desfasada

  • English
  • Español

Marching against a rule out of step

Story and video by Sherry Mazzocchi
Photos by QPHOTONYC

Community members gathered uptown to march in protest against the Dominican constitutional tribunal ruling TC/0168/13.

Community members gathered uptown to march in protest against the Dominican constitutional tribunal ruling TC/0168/13.

The march for human rights begins with a single step.

Marchers from the Bronx and Northern Manhattan protesting the Dominican Republic’s recent controversial ruling made their way from 207th Street and Broadway uptown to Times Square this past Sat., Nov. 16th.

About 30 marchers started out for the Dominican Consulate on 42nd Street on Saturday morning. They protested TC/0168/13, a constitutional tribunal ruling that revokes the citizenship of all people born of foreign-born parents since June 20, 1929.

“Basically, what they are saying is that anyone born between 1929 and 2010 under the previous constitution is no longer of Dominican descent if their parents weren’t recognized under Dominican laws,” said Amarylis Estrella, a participant in Saturday’s march.

“We all see this as an assault against Dominicans of Haitian descent,” said one protestor.

“We all see this as an assault against Dominicans of Haitian descent,” said one protestor.

It’s estimated that 200,000-225,000 people, mostly of Haitian descent, are impacted by the ruling. “We want to show that we stand alongside our brothers and sisters who are Dominicans of Haitian descent to show that we are not going to tolerate this,” she said.

One of the march’s organizers, Anthony Stevens-Acevedo, called the ruling “a tremendously discriminatory decision.”

Luis M. Rodríguez said that the ruling contributes to a discourse of hatred.

He compared the current climate in the Dominican Republic to Hitler’s Nazi Germany. The ruling has been denounced by Peruvian author Mario Vargas Llosa and the government has retaliated by burning his books.

Rodríguez, coordinator general of community organization Alianza País, who said he felt horrible and ashamed, said he believed that this could be the first step to burning people.

Protestors marched from 207th Street downtown to the Dominican Consulate at 42nd Street.

Protestors marched from 207th Street downtown to the Dominican Consulate at 42nd Street.

“The other day I was reading a Dominican newspaper which said that some Haitians living in the Dominican Republic were attacked by Dominicans,” he said. “I think that has a lot to do with hate speech.”

In 2010, the Dominican Republic amended its constitution, increasing the restrictions on Dominican nationals, declaring that anyone who is the child of undocumented immigrants is no longer a citizen. The new constitutional ruling interprets the amendment retroactively.

Applying a law retroactively is out of sync with most national and international judicial systems, said Stevens-Acevedo, a historian who specializes in the research and study of the 16th and 17th centuries of the Dominican Republic. He is also an elected foreign corresponding member of the Dominican Academy of History.

“Most laws are not applied retroactively unless they are in the benefit of an individual.”

The new constitution—as well as the old one—acknowledges that the children of Dominican parents that are born abroad are entitled to dual-citizenship.

Historian and activist Anthony Stevens-Acevedo (center) called the ruling “a tremendously discriminatory decision.”

Historian and activist Anthony Stevens-Acevedo (center) called the ruling “a tremendously discriminatory decision.”

Stevens-Acevedo noted that as an American of Dominican parents he is entitled to all of the rights of Dominican citizenship, with the possible sole exception of running for president of that country.

But those born in the Dominican Republic of people who had no papers are not protected by the constitution and are no longer citizens.

“So here you have this irony. They were born there, raised there, have never lived anywhere else, are part of the Dominican society, fabric and culture – and they are no longer Dominicans.”

“I was born in Queens, New York,” he continued. “And I am entitled to Dominican nationality.”

Many of the marchers were born in the U.S. of Dominican parents. “We can easily be impacted by laws like this,” Estrella said. “How would we feel if all of a sudden the U.S. told us we weren’t U.S. citizens?”

A formal letter denouncing the ruling was delivered to the Dominican Consulate.  Photo: A. Stevens-Acevedo

A formal letter denouncing the ruling was delivered to the Dominican Consulate.
Photo: A. Stevens-Acevedo

“For many of us, this is an appalling decision,” she said. “We all see this as an assault against Dominicans of Haitian descent, who have been attacked over and over again in the Dominican Republic.”

Another marcher, María Bautista, said the issue was important to her because her family has experienced racism in the U.S. Bautista is a naturalized U.S. citizen. “I believe Haitians should have that right as well,” she said.

Yanilda González, a Princeton University student from Washington Heights, said students and educators both wanted to do something physical and visible to demonstrate to New York’s Dominican community that the ruling is an issue with which everyone should be concerned.

With Facebook groups such as “We are all Dominican” and “EsoNoSeHaceRD” on YouTube, the marchers made clear that they were seeking to draw attention to the issue.

“We want to raise awareness on this issue,” said Yanilda González.

“We want to raise awareness on this issue,” said Yanilda González.

“That’s really our main point,” González said. “We were in the Heights last week and we came across a lot of people who hadn’t heard about the decision.”

Gerald McElroy, who’s worked in the Dominican Republic since 2005, created “EsoNoSeHaceRD” with several Dominican friends. “We’re hoping to get the awareness out.

There’s a lot of misinformation out there. People in the Dominican Republic think this has to do with migrants. This doesn’t affect a single migrant. It has to do with Dominicans who’ve lived their whole life there.”

At the end of the march, Stevens-Acevedo delivered a letter to the Consulate, whose offices were closed on Saturday. A doorman accepted the letter.

It formally denounced the ruling and urged the government to reaffirm the legal and civic dignity of all Dominicans, including children of undocumented immigrants.

The legislative and executive branches of the government say that their hands are tied because the ruling comes from a high court, said Stevens-Acevedo. Yet the Dominican government is tied to a number of international agreements protecting human rights.

Stevens-Acevedo insisted that changes could be made.

“The legislative and executive branches could look for ways of modifying the constitution itself,” he said.

To listen to Anthony Stevens-Acevedo, please visit http://bit.ly/MT_179.

Mr. Danilo Medina, President of the Dominican Republic
Palacio Nacional, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

 

Mr. Reinaldo Pared Pérez, President of the Senate Senate
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

 

Mr. Abel Martínez, President of the House of Representatives
House of Representatives, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

 

Honorable President Danilo Medina,
Honorable President of the Senate Reinaldo Pared Pérez,
Honorable President of the House of Representatives Abel Martínez,

 

We the undersigned, Dominican and Dominican children or descendants born or raised abroad, especially in America, hereby express our indignation and our vehement opposition to ethical and civic statement TC/0168/13 issued by the Constitutional Court of the Dominican Republic. This ruling in many ways violates the contents and intentions of the Constitution of the Dominican Republic since 2010. As it is intended to be applied retroactively, it violates human rights principles to which the Dominican government is bound by international treaties and conventions, especially inter-American.

Also understand that this decision, in addition to being illegitimate for the above reasons, shall also, in the opinion of many Dominican legal experts, lead to many legal and conceptual errors that make it legally invalid.

We understand that the TC/0168/13 ruling not only discriminates against generations of Dominican children born to foreign residents, but disproportionately affects a whole sector of the population consisting of Dominicans of Haitian descendants. As immigrant Dominicans and/or children of descendants of Dominican immigrants in the United States, we see, understand and share the feeling of indignation and distress of hundreds of thousands of Dominicans of Haitian descent by birth and by the origin of their immigrant parents.

It is precisely because of our experience combating discrimination as experienced as immigrants or descendants of immigrants in the United States and other nations that we are obliged to act.

Before this act is recognized in the Constitutional Court of the Dominican Republic as ordered within the current constitutional order of the nation, we want to appeal to the sense of civic responsibility and human dignity you, our top representatives of executive and legislative powers in the Dominican nation, possess. We ask that you exercise leadership and national authority conferred upon you by the Dominican people and take all the necessary administrative and legislative steps (including constitutional reform and necessary laws) to guarantee a full exercise of rights and protections afforded all Dominican-born children of immigrants in the Dominican Republic.

We urge you also to strengthen initiatives reaffirming the legal and civic dignity that all Dominicans claim, including the Dominican children of immigrants in the Dominican Republic. We urge you do all that is necessary for regional authorities and international legal entities of which the Dominican government is a signatory and member, as regards human rights, to compensate for the arbitrary, undemocratic and shameful decision of the Constitutional Court of the Dominican Republic and their respective orders to the Board of Elections of the country regarding the treatment of persons born in Dominican territory.

Finally, please note that in light of our positions as Dominicans and descendants of Dominicans living abroad and as a legitimate part of the Dominican nation, we wish to exert all efforts at our disposal to support and promote the full recognition of rights to those of Dominican nationality and rights to all persons born in Dominican territory.

Marcha contra una norma desfasada

Historia y video por Sherry Mazzocchi
Fotos por QPHOTONYC

Community members gathered uptown to march in protest against the Dominican constitutional tribunal ruling TC/0168/13.

Manifestantes protestaron contra la TC/0168/13, una resolución del Tribunal Constitucional Dominicano.

La marcha por los derechos humanos comienza con un solo paso.

Manifestantes del Bronx y del Alto Manhattan protestaron por la reciente, y controversial, decisión de la República Dominicana, caminando desde la calle 207 y Broadway hasta Times Square el pasado sábado 16 de noviembre.

Alrededor de 30 manifestantes se dirigieron al norte del condado hacia el Consulado Dominicano en la calle 42. Protestaron contra la TC/0168/13, una resolución del Tribunal Constitucional que revoca la ciudadanía de todas las personas nacidas de padres nacidos en el extranjero desde el 20 de junio de 1929.

“Básicamente, lo que están diciendo es que cualquier persona nacida entre 1929 y 2010 bajo la constitución anterior ya no es de origen dominicano si sus padres no fueron reconocidos por las leyes dominicanas”, dijo Amarylis Estrella, una participante en la marcha del sábado.

“We all see this as an assault against Dominicans of Haitian descent,” said one protestor.

“Todos vemos esto como un asalto contra los dominicanos de ascendencia haitiana” dijo un manifestante.

Se estima que entre 200,000 y 225,000 personas, en su mayoría de ascendencia haitiana, serán afectadas por el fallo. “Queremos manifestar que estamos al lado de nuestros hermanos y hermanas que son dominicanos de ascendencia haitiana para demostrar que no vamos a tolerar esto”, dijo.

Uno de los organizadores de la marcha, Anthony Stevens-Acevedo, calificó el fallo como “una decisión tremendamente discriminatoria”.

Luis M. Rodríguez, dijo que el fallo contribuye a un discurso de odio. Comparó la situación actual en la República Dominicana a la Alemania nazi de Hitler. La sentencia ha sido denunciada por el autor peruano Mario Vargas Llosa y el gobierno ha tomado represalias quemando sus libros. Rodríguez, coordinador general de Alianza País, dijo que este podría ser el primer paso para quemar gente. Dijo que se siente horrible y avergonzado y como dominicano no es capaz de permitir que esto suceda.

Protestors marched from 207th Street downtown to the Dominican Consulate at 42nd Street.

Manifestantes marcharon desde la calle 207 hasta al Consulado Dominicano.

En 2010, la República Dominicana modificó su constitución, aumentando las restricciones a los nacionales dominicanos y declarando que todo aquel que es hijo de inmigrantes indocumentados ya no es un ciudadano. La nueva norma constitucional interpreta la modificación de forma retroactiva.

La aplicación de una ley con carácter retroactivo está fuera de sincronización con la mayoría de los sistemas judiciales nacionales e internacionales, dijo Stevens-Acevedo, un historiador que se especializa en la investigación y el estudio de los siglos 16 y 17 de la República Dominicana.

Él es también un miembro corresponsal electo de la Academia Dominicana de la Historia.

“La mayoría de las leyes no se aplican retroactivamente, a menos que sean en beneficio de una persona”.

Historian and activist Anthony Stevens-Acevedo (center) called the ruling “a tremendously discriminatory decision.”

Historiador y activista Anthony Stevens-Acevedo (centro) calificó el fallo como “una decisión tremendamente discriminatoria”.

La nueva Constitución, así como la anterior, reconoce que los hijos de padres dominicanos que han nacido en el extranjero tienen derecho a la doble nacionalidad.

Stevens-Acevedo señaló que como estadounidense de padres dominicanos tiene derecho a todas las garantías de la ciudadanía dominicana, con la posible única excepción de aspirar a la presidencia de ese país.

Pero los nacidos en la República Dominicana de personas indocumentadas, no están protegidos por la Constitución, y ya no son ciudadanos.

“Así que aquí tienes esta ironía. Ellos nacieron allí, fueron criados allí, nunca han vivido en ningún otro lugar, son parte de la sociedad dominicana, parte de la cultura, y ya no son dominicanos”.

“Nací en Queens, Nueva York”, continuó. “Y yo tengo derecho a la nacionalidad dominicana”.

Muchos de los manifestantes nacieron en los Estados Unidos de padres dominicanos. “Nosotros fácilmente podemos vernos afectados por leyes como ésta”, dijo Estrella.

A formal letter denouncing the ruling was delivered to the Dominican Consulate.  Photo: A. Stevens-Acevedo

Una carta formal denunciando la resolución fue entregada.
Foto: A. Stevens-Acevedo

“¿Cómo nos sentiríamos si, de repente, los Estados Unidos nos dijeran que ya no somos ciudadanos americanos?”.

“Para muchos de nosotros, esta es una decisión lamentable”, dijo. “Todos vemos esto como un asalto contra los dominicanos de ascendencia haitiana, que han sido atacados una y otra vez en la República Dominicana”.

Otra manifestante, María Bautista, dijo que el tema era importante para ella porque su familia ha experimentado racismo en los Estados Unidos. Bautista es una ciudadana estadounidense naturalizada. “Creo que los haitianos deben tener ese derecho también”, dijo.

Yanilda González, estudiante de la Universidad de Princeton de Washington Heights, dijo que estudiantes y educadores querían hacer algo físico y visible para demostrar a la comunidad dominicana en Nueva York que la decisión es un asunto del que todo el mundo debería estar preocupado.

“We want to raise awareness on this issue,” said Yanilda González.

“Queremos crear conciencia sobre este tema”, dijo Yanilda González.

Con los grupos de Facebook, como “We are all Dominican” y “EsoNoSeHaceRD,” en YouTube, los manifestantes dejaron claro que buscan llamar la atención sobre el tema.

“Ese es realmente nuestro punto principal”, dijo González. “Estuvimos en the Heights la semana pasada y nos encontramos con un montón de gente que no había escuchado sobre la decisión”.

Gerald McElroy, quien ha trabajado en la República Dominicana desde el año 2005, creó “EsoNoSeHaceRD” con varios amigos dominicanos. “Tenemos la esperanza de conseguir consciencia hacia el exterior. Hay una gran cantidad de desinformación. La gente de la República Dominicana piensa que esto está relacionado con los migrantes. Esto no afecta a un solo inmigrante. Tiene que ver con los dominicanos que han vivido toda su vida allí”.

Al final de la marcha, Stevens-Acevedo entregó una carta al Consulado, cuyas oficinas estaban cerradas el sábado. La carta denuncia la decisión e insta al Gobierno a reafirmar la dignidad legal y cívica de todos los dominicanos, incluidos los hijos de los inmigrantes indocumentados.

Los poderes legislativo y ejecutivo del gobierno dicen que sus manos están atadas porque el fallo proviene de un alto tribunal, dijo Stevens-Acevedo. Sin embargo, el gobierno dominicano está vinculado a una serie de acuerdos internacionales de protección de los derechos humanos.

Stevens-Acevedo insiste en que los cambios podrían hacerse.

“Los poderes legislativo y ejecutivo podrían buscar formas de modificar la Constitución”, dijo.

Para oír de Anthony Stevens-Acevedo, favor visite http://bit.ly/MT_179.

Lic. Danilo Medina, Presidente de la República Dominicana
Palacio Nacional, Santo Domingo, República Dominicana

 

Lic. Reinaldo Pared Pérez, Presidente del Senado
Senado, Santo Domingo, República Dominciana

 

Lic. Abel Martínez, Presidente de la Cámara de Diputados
Cámara de Diputados, Santo Domingo, República Dominicana

 

Honorable Presidente de la República Danilo Medina,
Honorable Presidente del Senado Reinaldo Pared Pérez,
Honorable Presidente de la Cámara de Diputados Abel Martínez,

 

Los abajo firmantes, dominicanos e hijos o descendientes de dominicanos nacidos o criados en el exterior, especialmente en Estados Unidos, queremos expresarles por este medio nuestra más alta indignación y nuestro más rotundo rechazo ético y cívico a la sentencia TC/0168/13 emitida por el Tribunal Constitucional de la República Dominicana, por entender que viola en múltiples maneras los contenidos e intenciones de la Constitución de la República Dominicana vigente desde el año 2010, al aplicarla retroactivamente, y principios de derechos humanos a los que el Estado Dominicano está suscrito por tratados y convenios internacionales, especialmente interamericanos. Asimismo entendemos que dicha sentencia, además de ilegítima por las razones anteriores, incurre también –según la opinión autorizada de múltiples juristas dominicanos– en múltiples errores legales y conceptuales que la hacen jurídicamente inválida.

 

Entendemos que la sentencia TC/0168/13 no sólo aplica un trato discriminatorio a generaciones de dominicanos hijos de extranjeros residentes en República Dominicana, sino que afecta desproporcionadamente a todo un amplio sector de la nación dominicana constituido por dominicanos descendientes de inmigrantes haitianos. Como dominicanos inmigrantes e hijos o descendientes de dominicanos inmigrantes en Estados Unidos, vemos, entendemos y compartimos bien el sentimiento de indignación y desamparo de cientos de miles de dominicanos de nacimiento y de ascendencia haitiana por el origen de sus padres inmigrantes en República Dominicana precisamente por nuestra experiencia de lucha contra la discriminación vivida como inmigrantes o descendientes de inmigrantes en Estados Unidos y otras naciones del mundo.

 

Ante el privilegio de inapelabilidad que se supone se le reconoce al Tribunal Constitucional de la República Dominicana dentro del orden constitucional actual de la nación, queremos apelar al sentido de responsabilidad cívica y dignidad humana de ustedes, como máximos representantes de los poderes Ejecutivo y Legislativo de la nación dominicana, para que ejerzan el liderazgo y la autoridad nacionales que les confieren en el orden político dominicano su elección por el pueblo dominicano y tomen de inmediato todas las medidas administrativas estatales y todas las medidas legislativas (incluyendo las reformas constitucionales y/o legales que sean necesarias) para garantizar el ejercicio inmediato de todos los derechos y el goce de todas las protecciones que les corresponden a los dominicanos nacidos en República Dominicana hijos de inmigrantes en República Dominicana.

 

Asimismo les instamos a que, para fortalecer las iniciativas de reafirmación de la dignidad cívica y legal de todos los dominicanos que reclamamos, incluyendo las de los dominicanos hijos de inmigrantes en República Dominicana, recurran en todo lo que sea necesario a la autoridad conferida a las entidades jurídicas regionales e internacionales de las que el Estado Dominicano es signatario y miembro, en materia de derechos humanos, para compensar la arbitraria, antidemocrática y bochornosa decisión del Tribunal Constitucional de la República Dominicana y sus respectivas órdenes a la Junta Electoral de la República en cuanto al tratamiento de la nacionalidad de las personas nacidas en territorio dominicano.

Finalmente, les informamos que desde nuestra situación de dominicanos y descendientes de dominicanos residentes en el exterior y sintiéndonos parte legítima de la nación dominicana, ejerceremos todas las iniciativas que estén a nuestro alcance para apoyar e impulsar el reconocimiento pleno y cuanto antes de la nacionalidad dominicana y sus derechos a todas las personas nacidas en territorio dominicano a padres inmigrantes residentes en el país.