Keeping Carlos free

Nueva asistencia legal para los inmigrantes detenidos

Nueva asistencia legal para los inmigrantes detenidos

  • English
  • Español

Keeping Carlos free

New legal assistance for immigration detainees

Story by Sherry Mazzocchi

“The due process violations are astounding,” said Angela Fernández, Executive Director of the Northern Manhattan Coalition for Immigrants’ Rights, of immigration law.  Photo: Center for Popular Democracy

“The due process violations are astounding,” said Angela Fernández, Executive Director of the Northern Manhattan Coalition for Immigrants’ Rights, of immigration law.
Photo: Center for Popular Democracy

When Carlos Rodríguez Vásquez was detained, he couldn’t afford an immigration lawyer. He sat in detention for eight months, away from his family and his job.

Vásquez’s case is not unique. In New York City about 1,700 people are detained each year and face deportation because they can’t afford a lawyer.

But a new program seeks to provide attorneys for people who can’t afford them.

The New York Immigrant Family Unity Project (NYIFUP) is the first of its kind in the United States.

It provides court-appointed attorneys to immigrants who are detained and at risk of being deported and who could not otherwise afford legal representation.

In the U.S., people charged with a crime have the right to a court-appointed lawyer if they can’t afford one. But in civil matters—such as immigration—defendants do not have the right to court-appointed counsel.

The pilot program was created through the efforts several social justice organizations, including the Northern Manhattan Coalition for Immigrant Rights (NMCIR), the Center for Popular Democracy and Make the Road New York (MRNY).

The idea for the program originated with a study from a committee organized by Judge Robert A. Katzmann, Chief Judge of the Second Circuit Court of Appeals.

He’d seen negative impacts on immigrants without lawyers. He also found that many immigration lawyers weren’t of the highest caliber, and often not did not advocate vigorously for their clients. They didn’t argue, for example, for the benefits and legal remedies their clients were entitled.

One reason is that immigration law is as complex as tax law, said Angela Fernández, NMCIR’s Executive Director.

The new program will offer legal aid to about 190 people of the approximately 900 immigrants at the Varick Street Immigration Court.  Photo: Center for Popular Democracy

The new program will offer legal aid to about 190 people of the approximately 900 immigrants at the Varick Street Immigration Court.
Photo: Center for Popular Democracy

People sit detention for months at a time because they don’t have an attorney, she said. The procedures take much longer because the defendant doesn’t know what to do.

“The due process violations are astounding,” said Fernández. People sit in detention for months at a time because they don’t have an attorney. “They don’t know what to seek, what they should be looking out for and a simple motion to file. And they just get back into detention when the judge says, ‘O.K., we’ll have you back here in three months.’”

The study commissioned by Judge Katzmann found that 60 percent of New Yorkers facing deportation at the Varick Street Immigration Court did not have an immigration lawyer. Of those cases, only 3 percent prevented their deportation.

The study recommended creating a program to train and provide legal services to immigrants. During its last budget cycle, City Council allocated $500,000 for the project. The funds will go to The Bronx Defenders and Brooklyn Defender Services, the two organizations chosen through a Request for Proposal (RFP) process overseen by the Vera Institute of Justice.

“The NYIFUP demonstrates how even those who might be adversaries in court come together around core values we all share: safeguarding the integrity, fairness, and efficiency of our system of justice which depends on adequate and effective counsel,” Judge Katzmann said in a press release.

Launched this past Thurs., Nov. 7th, the program seeks to help about 190 people of the approximately 900 indigent detained and otherwise-unrepresented immigrants who will face deportation in the New York City Immigration Court this year.

“It’s a small subset, but we are really, really hopeful that the project will show the value of providing counsel,” said Brittny Saunders, Senior Staff Attorney for Immigrant and Civil Rights.

Saunders said that the program guides immigrants through the process. “It also benefits the immigration courts themselves because things move that much more quickly and efficiently,” she said. “So we are really excited to see the impact this program is going to have.”

“Any person held in detention – and especially those facing deportation and separation from family and community – should have a right to high quality legal representation,” noted Robin Steinberg, Executive Director of The Bronx Defenders. “The Bronx Defenders is thrilled to be part of a groundbreaking initiative that will expand our holistic model and extend legal defense to immigrants fighting to stay in this country.”

“We are hopeful that the project will show the value of providing counsel,” said Brittny Saunders, Senior Staff Attorney for Immigrant and Civil Rights.  Photo: Center for Popular Democracy

“We are hopeful that the project will show the value of providing counsel,” said Brittny Saunders, Senior Staff Attorney for Immigrant and Civil Rights.
Photo: Center for Popular Democracy

The economic impact of detention and deportation ripples throughout society. A study by the Center for Popular Democracy found that New YorkState employers pay about $9.1 million to replace employees facing detention.

Detention often makes it difficult for children to attend or complete school. That limits their future income, decreases potential tax revenues and increases the likelihood of participation in public programs, which the study estimated as a cost of $3.1 million to the state. In addition, the New York pays more than $562,000 to provide foster care for children whose parents are in detention.

Saunders estimated that NYIFUP could reduce $5.9 million in costs to the state.

“It’s a significant offset,” she said. “The families are not the only ones who bear these costs.”

The emotional tolls families are unquantifiable.

Most detainees are not held in New York City. They are detained in facilities in New Jersey or upstate New York, hours away from their families.

Vásquez would still be in a New Jersey detention center if it hadn’t been for the program. “Thanks to the lawyers at CardozoLawSchool and the work of the rest of the NYIFUP team, I was released and now continue to fight my case, while being home with my daughter and family. I am also fortunate in that my boss took me back, and I am now making money to sustain my family once again,” he said in a press release.

“We did a tremendous amount of advocacy for him within this campaign,” said Fernández. “And it turns out, he should never have been detained.”

For more information on NYIFUP, please visit the www.nmcir.org or www.populardemocracy.org.

Nueva asistencia legal para los inmigrantes detenidos

Historia por Sherry Mazzocchi

“The due process violations are astounding,” said Angela Fernández, Executive Director of the Northern Manhattan Coalition for Immigrants’ Rights, of immigration law.  Photo: Center for Popular Democracy

“Las violaciones al debido proceso son impresionantes”, dijo Ángela Fernández, directora ejecutiva de la Coalición del Norte de Manhattan para los Derechos de los Inmigrantes, sobre la ley de inmigración.
Foto: Center for Popular Democracy

Cuando Carlos Rodríguez Vásquez fue detenido, no podía pagar un abogado de inmigración. Estuvo en prisión durante ocho meses, lejos de su familia y su trabajo.

El caso de Vásquez no es único. En la ciudad de Nueva York, cerca de 1,700 personas son detenidas cada año y deportadas porque no pueden pagar un abogado.

Sin embargo, un nuevo programa busca proporcionar abogados para las personas que no puedan pagarlos.

El Immigrant Family Unity Project de Nueva York (NYIFUP por sus siglas en inglés) es el primero de su tipo en los Estados Unidos.

Proporciona abogados de oficio a los inmigrantes que son detenidos, corren el riesgo de ser deportados y que no pueden pagar la representación legal.

En los Estados Unidos, las personas acusadas de un delito tienen derecho a un abogado de oficio si no pueden pagarlo. Pero en asuntos civiles, como la inmigración, los acusados no tienen derecho a un abogado designado por el tribunal.

El programa piloto fue creado a través de los esfuerzos de varias organizaciones de justicia social, incluyendo la Coalición del Norte de Manhattan para los Derechos de los Inmigrantes (NMCIR por sus siglas en inglés), el Centro para la Democracia Popular y Make the Road Nueva York (MRNY).

La idea para el programa se originó con un estudio de un comité organizado por el juez Robert A. Katzmann, Juez Principal del Segundo Tribunal de Circuito de Apelaciones.

Había visto impactos negativos en los inmigrantes sin abogado. También descubrió que muchos abogados de inmigración no eran de la más alta calidad, y con frecuencia no abogaban enérgicamente por sus clientes. No argumentaban, por ejemplo, los beneficios y recursos legales a los que sus clientes tenían derecho.

Una de las razones es que la ley de inmigración es tan compleja como la legislación fiscal, dijo Ángela Fernández, directora ejecutiva de NMCIR.

The new program will offer legal aid to about 190 people of the approximately 900 immigrants at the Varick Street Immigration Court.  Photo: Center for Popular Democracy

El nuevo programa ofrecerá asistencia jurídica a cerca de 190 personas de los aproximadamente 900 inmigrantes en la Corte de Inmigración de la calle Varick.
Foto: Center for Popular Democracy

La gente queda en detención durante meses por no tener un abogado, dijo. Los procedimientos toman mucho más tiempo debido a que el acusado no sabe qué hacer.

“Las violaciones al debido proceso son impresionantes”, dijo Fernández. La gente se queda detenida durante meses porque no tiene un abogado. “No saben lo que persiguen, deberían estar buscando salir, conseguir una moción y simplemente volver a prisión cuando el juez diga, OK, lo tendremos de vuelta aquí en tres meses”.

El estudio encargado por el juez Katzmann encontró que el 60 por ciento de los neoyorquinos que enfrentan la deportación en la Corte de Inmigración de la calle Varick no tuvo un abogado de inmigración. De esos casos, sólo el 3 por ciento impidió su deportación.

El estudio recomienda la creación de un programa para capacitar y proveer servicios legales a inmigrantes. Durante el último ciclo presupuestario, el Ayuntamiento asignó $500,000 dólares para el proyecto. Los fondos se destinarán a The Bronx Defenders and Brooklyn Defender Services, las dos organizaciones elegidas a través de un proceso de Solicitud de Propuestas (RFP por sus siglas en inglés) supervisado por el Instituto Vera.

“El NYIFUP demuestra cómo incluso aquellos que podrían ser adversarios en la corte se reúnen en torno a los valores fundamentales que todos compartimos: la salvaguardia de la integridad, la equidad y la eficiencia de nuestro sistema de justicia que depende de una defensa adecuada y eficaz”, dijo el juez Katzmann en un comunicado de prensa.

Lanzado el pasado jueves 7 de noviembre, el programa busca ayudar a cerca de 190 personas de los aproximadamente 900 detenidos indigentes e inmigrantes que enfrentarán la deportación en la Corte de Inmigración de Nueva York este año, y que, de lo contrario, no podrían tener representación legal.

“Es un pequeño grupo, pero estamos muy, muy esperanzados de que el proyecto mostrará el valor de brindar asesoría,” dijo Brittny Saunders, abogado de derechos civiles y de Inmigrantes.

Saunders dijo que el programa guía a los inmigrantes en el proceso. “También beneficia a los propios tribunales de inmigración, porque las cosas se mueven de forma mucho más rápida y eficiente”, dijo. “Así que estamos muy contentos de ver el impacto que este programa va a tener”.

“We are hopeful that the project will show the value of providing counsel,” said Brittny Saunders, Senior Staff Attorney for Immigrant and Civil Rights.  Photo: Center for Popular Democracy

“Tenemos la esperanza de que el proyecto mostrará el valor de brindar asesoría,” dijo Brittny Saunders, abogado para los Derechos civiles y de Inmigrantes.
Foto: Center for Popular Democracy

“Cualquier persona que se encuentre en prisión -y especialmente aquellos que enfrentan la deportación y la separación de la familia y de la comunidad- debe tener el derecho a la representación legal de alta calidad”, señaló Robin Steinberg, directora ejecutiva de The Defenders Bronx. “Bronx Defenders está encantado de formar parte de una iniciativa pionera que permitirá ampliar nuestro modelo integral y cubrir la defensa legal de los inmigrantes que luchan por permanecer en este país”.

El impacto económico de la detención y deportación tendrá un efecto dominó en toda la sociedad. Un estudio realizado por el Centro para la Democracia Popular encontró que los empleadores del estado de Nueva York pagan alrededor de $9.1 millones para reemplazar a los empleados que enfrentan la detención.

La detención a menudo hace que sea difícil que los niños asistan a la escuela o la terminen. Esto limita sus ingresos futuros, disminuye los ingresos fiscales potenciales y aumenta la probabilidad de la participación en los programas públicos, que el estudio estima como un costo de $3.1 millones de dólares para el estado. Además, el estado de Nueva York paga más de $562,000 dólares para proporcionar cuidado de crianza para los niños cuyos padres están en detención.

Saunders estimó que NYIFUP podría reducir $5.9 millones de dólares en costos para el estado.

“Es una compensación significativa”, dijo. “Las familias no son las únicas que soportan estos costos”.

Los estragos emocionales de las familias no se pueden cuantificar.

La mayoría de los detenidos no están en la ciudad de Nueva York. Ellos se encuentran detenidos en las instalaciones de Nueva Jersey o del estado de Nueva York, a horas de distancia de sus familias.

Vásquez todavía estaría en un centro de detención de Nueva Jersey si no hubiera sido por el programa. “Gracias a los abogados de la Escuela de Derecho Cardozo y el trabajo del resto del equipo NYIFUP, fui liberado y sigo defendiendo mi caso desde casa, con mi hija y mi familia. También soy afortunado de que mi jefe me contratara de nuevo y estoy trabajando para sostener a mi familia”, dijo en un comunicado de prensa.

“Hicimos un gran trabajo de defensa para él en esta campaña”, dijo Fernández. “Y resulta que nunca debió haber sido detenido”.

Para más información sobre NYIFUP, por favor visite www.nmcir.org o www.populardemocracy.org.