LocalNewsPolitics/governmentPublic Safety

“It’s something you don’t get over”

“Es algo de lo que no te recuperas”

On Wed., Feb. 26th, as part of a nationwide protest marking two years since the killing of Trayvon Martin, and recent mistrial of Michael Dunn in the Jordan Davis case, the Stop Mass Incarceration Network is urging people throughout the city to join in “Hoodies Up!”.

The Network is asking people to “put on a hoodie for Trayvon, hold a target with the message of ‘No More’” and meet at 5 p.m. at Union Square.

For more information on the Hoodies Up! protest and the Stop Mass Incarceration Network, please visit http://bit.ly/1ekBaTY.


“It’s something you don’t get over”

Amid calls for justice, honoring loss

Story by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


Mothers who had lost their children to gun violence were honored as part of Black History Month.  Photo: QPHOTONYC
Mothers who had lost their children to gun violence were honored as part of Black History Month.
Photo: QPHOTONYC

There could hardly be a more bittersweet celebration.

In honor of Black History Month, local union 1199 SEIU, chose to highlight the accomplishments of a host of remarkable women, whose lives have been joined in – but not defined by – loss.

On Fri., Feb. 21st, the 1199 SEIU’s National Benefit Fund Staff Association and the union’s African American Caucus, recognized mothers who have lost their children to gun violence.

Among those honored were Constance Malcolm; Valerie Bell; Sabryna Fulton; Jackie Rowe-Adams; and Amina Baraka (née Sylvia Robinson).

Each woman received plaques and proclamations on Friday for their efforts to seek the justice denied their own children: a life free of violence. Also recognized were three members of the so-called “Central Park Five,” a group of five black and Latino teenagers who were arrested and charged for the brutal attack and rape of a white female jogger in Central Park in 1989. After spending years in prison, the five were exonerated when DNA evidence proved they had not committed the crime.

“These things happen, and we have a great sense of injustice,” said George Gresham, President of 1199 SEIU in his remarks to the approximately 200 people gathered at the union’s headquarters in the Theater District. “But it has also brought us together as a family.”

“Justice equals justice for everyone,” said 1199 SEIU President George Gresham.  Photo: QPHOTONYC
“Justice equals justice for everyone,” said 1199 SEIU President George Gresham.
Photo: QPHOTONYC

Councilmember Andy King presented proclamations to the honorees.

Still, though there were live performances by youth artists and the presence of “The King of Calypso,” activist and actor Harry Belafonte, the event bore a tone more somber and reflective than of jubilance.

That the losses of three of the families present were marked by the presence of law enforcement and watchman services was not lost.

Constance Malcolm’s son Ramarley Graham was shot to death in the Bronx in February 2012 after police entered his family’s home without a warrant. The teenager was killed, unarmed. Valerie Ball lost her son, Sean Bell, in 2006. Bell, also unarmed, was shot 51 times by police the night before his wedding. Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman.

Jackie Rowe-Adams has lost two of her sons to gun violence. In February 1982, her 17-year-old son Anthony was murdered outside a bodega in Harlem. Her son Tyrone was later shot to death by a thirteen-year-old during a robbery in Baltimore, Maryland.

Amina Baraka, widow of recently deceased New Jersey Poet Laureate Amiri Baraka, lost her daughter, Shani Baraka, when she was shot by her sister’s estranged husband.

The Central Park Five continue their own battles. The group has brought a $250 million lawsuit against the city for its wrongful convictions. And though Mayor Bill de Blasio has signaled that his administration will seek to settle the case swiftly, there has been yet no resolution.

Mothers (from left to right) Jackie Rowe-Adams, Sabryna Fulton and Valerie Bell.
Mothers (from left to right) Jackie Rowe-Adams, Sabryna Fulton and Valerie Bell.

“It’s an honor to be in your presence. I love you,” said Raymond Santana, one of the Central Park Five. “You are our mothers and we are your sons.”

The mothers also had their say.

“Let’s take back our kids, let’s take back our community,” said Rowe-Adams, who has co-founded Harlem Mothers S.A.V.E, an organization that advocates for stricter gun control.

Malcolm, mother of Bronx teen Ramarley Graham, was in tears as she addressed the audience.  The U.S. Justice Department is currently reviewing the case against Richard Haste, the officer who shot Graham. Haste was indicted by a Bronx grand jury, but a judge threw out the case on a technicality last spring.

Councilmember Andy King presented City Council proclamations to the honorees.  Photo: QPHOTONYC
Councilmember Andy King presented City Council proclamations to the honorees.
Photo: QPHOTONYC

Malcolm, a past 1199 member, said that, for her, the fact that Haste walked free was alarming.

“If a police officer can just come into your house and shoot unarmed people—it opens the doors for others to do it,” she argued.

Malcolm added that she is still trying to get over the death of her son.

“It’s still fresh. It’s something you don’t get over. That’s my child. He got murdered,” she said. “That’s the worst thing that could ever happen.”

Like Rowe-Adams, Malcolm has taken to activism, founding Ramarley’s Call to advocate against gun violence and to honor the memory of her son.

Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin, thanked the union, and New York, for its continued support of her family. New York City was one of the many cities across the country to hold a “Million Hoodies March” to protest the death of her son. Fulton has also met with Reverend Al Sharpton at the National Action Network in Harlem.

“Although I am in Florida, it was New York that first showed the love to my family,” she said.

The tone of sorrow – and theme of justice – were twinned as the mothers were engulfed by well-wishers who offered tearful embraces and urged words of encouragement.

“Justice equals justice for everyone,” said President Gresham. “And we will never lower our voices until we can walk the streets without any fear, free of injustice.” 

 

“Es algo de lo que no te recuperas”

Entre llamados de justicia, homenaje a la pérdida

Historia por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


“Justice equals justice for everyone,” said 1199 SEIU President George Gresham.  Photo: QPHOTONYC
“La justicia equivale a justicia para todos”, dijo el presidente de 1199 SEIU, George Gresham.
Foto: QPHOTONYC

Sería difícil encontrar una celebración más agridulce.

En honor al Mes de la Historia Negra, el sindicato local 1199 SEIU, optó por destacar los logros de una serie de notables mujeres, cuyas vidas se han unido por -pero no son definidas por- la pérdida.

El viernes 21 de febrero, el 1199 la Asociación Nacional de Fondos de Beneficios del Personal de SEIU y el Caucus afroamericano del sindicato, reconocieron a las madres que han perdido a sus hijos por la violencia armada.

Entre las homenajeadas estaban Constanza Malcolm; Valerie Bell; Sabryna Fulton; Jackie Rowe-Adams, y Amina Baraka (nacida Sylvia Robinson).

Cada mujer recibió placas y proclamas el viernes por sus esfuerzos en la búsqueda de la justicia negada a sus propios hijos: una vida libre de violencia. También reconocieron a tres miembros del llamado “Central Park Five”, un grupo de cinco adolescentes negros y latinos que fueron detenidos y acusados por el ataque brutal y violación de una corredora blanca en el Parque Central en 1989. Después de pasar años en la cárcel, los cinco fueron exonerados cuando las pruebas de ADN demostraron que no habían cometido el crimen.

“Estas cosas pasan, y tenemos un gran sentimiento de injusticia”, dijo George Gresham, presidente de 1199 SEIU en su discurso a las casi 200 personas reunidas en la sede del sindicato en la zona de los teatros. “Pero también nos ha unido como una familia.”

Councilmember Andy King presented City Council proclamations to the honorees.  Photo: QPHOTONYC
El concejal Andy King presentó proclamas del Consejo de la ciudad a las homenajeadas.
Foto: QPHOTONYC

El concejal Andy King presentó proclamas a los homenajeados.

Aunque hubo presentaciones en vivo de artistas jóvenes y la presencia de “El Rey del Calypso”, activista y actor Harry Belafonte, el evento tuvo un tono más sombrío y reflexivo que de júbilo.

Que las pérdidas de tres de las familias presentes estuvieran marcadas por la presencia de los servicios encargados de hacer cumplir la ley y los vigilantes no pasó desapercibido.

El hijo de Constanza Malcolm, Ramarley Graham, fue asesinado a balazos en el Bronx en febrero de 2012 después que la policía entrara en la casa de su familia sin orden judicial. El adolescente desarmado fue asesinado. Valerie Ball perdió a su hijo, Sean Bell, en 2006. Bell, también desarmado, fue baleado 51 veces por la policía la noche previa a su boda. Trayvon Martin fue baleado y muerto por el vigilante del vecindario George Zimmerman.

Jackie Rowe-Adams perdió a dos de sus hijos por la violencia armada. En febrero de 1982, su hijo de 17 años de edad, Anthony, fue asesinado afuera de una bodega en Harlem. Su hijo Tyrone fue asesinado más tarde a balazos por un niño de trece años de edad, durante un robo en Baltimore, Maryland.

Amina Baraka, viuda del recientemente fallecido poeta laureado de Nueva Jersey Amiri Baraka, perdió a su hija, Shani Baraka, cuando fue baleada por el esposo separado de su hermana.

El Central Park Five sigue sus propias batallas. El grupo ha interpuesto una demanda por 250 millones dólares contra la ciudad por sus condenas erróneas. Y aunque el alcalde Bill de Blasio ha señalado que su gobierno tratará de resolver el caso rápidamente, no ha habido todavía ninguna resolución.

Mothers (from left to right) Jackie Rowe-Adams, Sabryna Fulton and Valerie Bell.
Madres (de izquierda a derecha) Jackie Rowe-Adams, Sabryna Fulton y Valerie Bell.

“Es un honor estar en su presencia. Las amo”, dijo Raymond Santana, uno de los Central Park Five. “Ustedes son nuestras madres y nosotros somos sus hijos”.

Las madres también tenían algo que decir.

“Vamos a  recuperar a nuestros hijos, vamos a recuperar nuestra comunidad”, dijo Rowe-Adams, quien  co-fundó Harlem Mothers S.A.V.E., una organización que aboga por un más estricto control de armas.

Los miembros del Programa de Empoderamiento Juvenil. Foto: R. Kilmer
Los miembros del Programa de Empoderamiento Juvenil.
Foto: R. Kilmer

Malcolm, madre del adolescente del Bronx Ramarley Graham, lloraba mientras se dirigía a la audiencia. El Departamento de Justicia de Estados Unidos está revisando el caso contra Richard Haste, el oficial que le disparó a Graham. Haste fue acusado por un gran jurado del Bronx, pero un juez desestimó el caso por un tecnicismo en la primavera pasada.

Malcolm, antigua miembro de 1199 dijo que, para ella, el hecho de que Haste quedara en libertad es alarmante.

“Si un policía puede simplemente entrar en tu casa y disparar contra personas desarmadas, abre las puertas para que otros lo hagan”, argumentó.

Malcolm añadió que todavía está tratando de superar la muerte de su hijo.

“Aún está fresca la herida. Es algo que no logras dejar atrás. Ese es mi hijo. Él fue asesinado”, dijo. “Es lo peor que podía pasar”.

Entre los asistentes estaba el activista y actor de los derechos civiles Harry Belafonte. Foto: QPHOTONYC
Entre los asistentes estaba el activista y actor de los derechos civiles Harry Belafonte.
Foto: QPHOTONYC

Al igual que Rowe-Adams, Malcolm se ha vuelto al activismo, fundando Ramarley’s Call para abogar contra la violencia armada y honrar la memoria de su hijo.

Fulton, madre de Trayvon Martin, dio las gracias a la unión, y a Nueva York, por el continuo apoyo a su familia. La ciudad de Nueva York fue una de las muchas ciudades en todo el país que celebró la  marcha “un millón de sudaderas con capucha” para protestar por la muerte de su hijo. Fulton también se reunió con el reverendo Al Sharpton en la Red de Acción Nacional en Harlem.

“Aunque estoy en Florida, fue Nueva York, quien mostró primero amor hacia mi familia”, dijo.

El tono de tristeza -y el tema de la justicia- estaban hermanados mientras las madres eran engullidas por la gente de bien que ofrecieron abrazos llenos de lágrimas e instaron palabras de aliento.

“La justicia equivale a justicia para todos”, dijo el presidente Gresham. “Y nunca vamos a disminuir nuestras voces hasta que podamos caminar por las calles sin miedo, libres de injusticia”. 

Related Articles

Check Also
Close
Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker