HealthNews

“It was a battle”
“Fue una batalla”

“It was a battle”

Fighting against sickle cell disease

Story and photos by Sherry Mazzocchi


“I decided to have the baby,” said Moira Mercado, with her daughter Ivanna, who was diagnosed with sickle cell disease in utero.
“I decided to have the baby,” said Moira Mercado, with her daughter Ivanna, who was diagnosed with sickle cell disease in utero.

When Moira Mercado was six months pregnant, she found out the child she was carrying had sickle cell disease.

“It was hard,” she said. “But I decided to have the baby.”

It was a roller coaster ride from that day forward, and both mother and daughter held on for the ride of their lives.

When her daughter Ivanna was just two months old, she started having blood transfusions. At age one, her spleen had to be removed. She had a stroke at age three.

The doctors at Montefiore Medical Center referred her to Dr. Monica Bhatia.

Dr. Bhatia, the Director of Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplantation at New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, recommended a bone marrow transplant.

Sickle cell disease is a genetic disorder.

The disease turns round red blood cells into a crescent, or sickle, shape and inhibits the ability of hemoglobin to carry oxygen throughout the body. More than 100,000 people in the U.S., mostly African-Americans and Hispanics, have the disease. Two million more have the trait, or are carriers without symptoms.

Patients and family members gathered at Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital for Sickle Cell Awareness Day.
Patients and family members gathered at Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital for Sickle Cell Awareness Day.

“It is the most common genetic disorder in the country,” said Dr. Bhatia.

About two hundred patients and family members gathered at Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital for Sickle Cell Awareness Day this past Sun., Sept. 8th. They shared their stories with each other.

Alex Oates told the audience that, at first, he didn’t want his son to have a bone marrow transplant. Bryce was diagnosed with the disease at two months, but he seemed fine. Tiffany Taylor-Oates, his wife, didn’t agree. She’d seen the effects of the disease in her own family and her community.

Just days after his first birthday, Bryce was in the hospital having a blood transfusion. “This was the beginning of a lifetime of hospital stays, pain and treatment,” Taylor-Oates said.

She talked to Dr. Bhatia about treatment options. “I consider her to be a family member,” she said. By the time Taylor-Oates was pregnant with her second son Brandon, she found out about the sibling connection program.

If her son was born without the disease, he could possibly donate his bone marrow to his brother. Statistically, there is only a 14 percent chance that Brandon’s bone marrow would be a perfect match.

It turned out he was.

“It was a battle,” said mother Tiffany Taylor-Oates with Bryce (on her lap) and Brandon (left)
“It was a battle,” said mother Tiffany Taylor-Oates with Bryce (on her lap) and Brandon (left).

Her husband was still reluctant. They went through five months of counseling at the hospital to decide what to do. “He didn’t want to do it,” she said. “It was a battle.”

Dr. Bhatia said that the bone marrow transplants have a 90 percent cure rate, but Oates was still on the fence. She told the Fordham Road couple that bone marrow transplants from siblings are very safe, but there are risks. There was a small possibility that the body could reject the donor cells.

With unrelated donors, the risk increases. Patients could get Graft vs. Host disease—where donor cells attack the organs of the host and cause damage. Dr. Bhatia also told him that a bone marrow transplant was the only way to cure his son.

As Dr. Andrew Kung, Director of the Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation at Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital explained, “The transplant replaces the blood forming cells in the body with someone else’s blood forming cells. As long as the donor doesn’t have sickle cell disease, the patient after a bone marrow transplant will have a totally normal blood forming system. That’s why we say transplant is the only curative option—and we use the term cure to mean precisely that.”

Once Oates was convinced of the benefits, another battle for Bryce’s treatment began. Their insurance denied coverage.

“I kept with the fight,” Taylor-Oates said. But inside she was devastated. She didn’t want anyone to know, especially her husband. It took so long just to get him on board that she didn’t want to give him a reason to back down.

Keirol La Barrie, now 12, had a bone marrow transplant in 2006.
Keirol La Barrie, now 12, had a bone marrow transplant in 2006.

“But at night, I cried. At work, I cried. Any quiet time, I cried. I couldn’t believe someone would deny our child the right to live,” she said. “It was all business and money to them at the end of the day.”

Insurance companies are used to covering standard treatments, Dr. Kung said. About 650 bone marrow transplants for sickle cell disease have been performed in the U.S. during the past 15 years. “Just as we are trying to educate patients at the event today, we have to educate insurers as well. This is not the standard way that sickle cell is treated across the country. But this is the way all sickle cell will be treated in the future.”

The hospital’s social worker worked with Taylor-Oates to find an insurance carrier that had a history of covering the procedure.

Four days after Taylor-Oates changed her insurance carrier, the procedure was approved.

Carol and Anthony La Barrie’s son Keirol was diagnosed with sickle cell disease when he was three months old. In their native country of Trinidad, children with the disease only live to age 14.

“It’s like a death sentence,” said Mr. La Barrie.

Their physician at Brooklyn’s Brookdale Hospital, Dr. Kenneth Rivlin, recommended they go to New York-Presbyterian for a bone marrow transplant. Keirol’s brother Keiquon was a perfect match.

More than 100,000 people in the U.S., mostly African-Americans and Hispanics, have the disease.
More than 100,000 people in the U.S., mostly African-Americans and Hispanics, have the disease.

The procedure involves a week of chemotherapy to ablate the existing bone marrow. Keirol lost his hair. He had to take steroids and he blew up like a balloon. His skin got darker and suddenly he looked much older. “That was scary,” his mother said. The bone marrow transplant—delivered intravenously—took about an hour.

After the transplant, Keirol spent three months in the hospital. Because his immune system was depressed, he was kept in isolation. His mother stayed with him the most of the time, but nearly everyone else had to visit him behind glass doors. The oldest daughter took care of the other four children. Keiquon, who was still an infant, often stayed with his grandmother. Keirol’s father worked and was also getting his undergraduate degree at Baruch College. After work and then class, he’d come uptown and visit his son before going to the family home in Brooklyn.

“It was so very stressful,” his mother said.

But a year after their treatment, Keirol, Bryce and Ivanna are all healthy. They no longer have the disease.

Alex Oates told the audience that it was a strenuous process.

“But you as a parent have to hold on strong,” he said. “You have to be there for your child.”

He offered other parents his cell phone number and invited them to call.

“If you need the help, just reach out. I live in the Bronx.”

“Fue una batalla”

La lucha contra la enfermedad de células falciformes

Historia y fotos Sherry Mazzocchi


“I decided to have the baby,” said Moira Mercado, with her daughter Ivanna, who was diagnosed with sickle cell disease in utero.
“Decidí tener a la bebé”, dijo Moira Mercado, con su hija Ivanna, quien fue diagnosticada con la enfermedad de células falciformes mientras estaba en el útero.

Cuando Moira Mercado tenía seis meses de embarazo, se enteró de que la niña que llevaba tenía la enfermedad de células falciformes.

“Fue duro”, dijo. “Pero decidí tener a la bebé”.

Fue un camino con altas y bajas de ese día en adelante y tanto la madre como la hija tuvieron la experiencia de sus vidas.

Cuando su hija Ivanna tenía tan sólo dos meses de edad, empezó a recibir transfusiones de sangre. Al año, el bazo le tuvo que ser retirado. Tuvo un derrame cerebral a los tres.

Los médicos del Centro Médico Montefiore la remitieron con la Dra. Monica Bhatia.

La Dra. Bhatia, Directora de Trasplante Pediátrico de Médula Ósea del Hospital New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley para niños recomendó un trasplante de médula ósea.

La enfermedad de células falciformes es un trastorno genético.

La enfermedad convierte los glóbulos rojos redondos en una media luna o con forma de hoz, e inhibe la habilidad de la hemoglobina para transportar oxígeno por todo el cuerpo. Más de 100,000 personas en los Estados Unidos, en su mayoría afroamericanos e hispanos, tienen la enfermedad. Dos millones más tienen la característica, o son portadores sin síntomas.

Patients and family members gathered at Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital for Sickle Cell Awareness Day.
Pacientes y familiares se reunieron en el Hospital de Niños Morgan Stanley para crear conciencia en el día de la enfermedad de células falciformes.

“Es la enfermedad genética más común en el país”, dijo la Dra. Bhatia.

Cerca de doscientos pacientes y familiares se reunieron en el Hospital de Niños Morgan Stanley para crear conciencia en el día de la enfermedad de células falciformes, el pasado domingo 8 de septiembre. Ellos compartieron sus historias con los demás.

Alex Oates dijo a la audiencia que al principio, no quería que su hijo tuviera un trasplante de médula ósea. Bryce fue diagnosticado con la enfermedad a los dos meses, pero parecía estar bien. Tiffany Taylor-Oates, su mujer, no estaba de acuerdo. Había visto los efectos de la enfermedad en su familia y su comunidad.

Apenas unos días después de su primer cumpleaños, Bryce estaba en el hospital recibiendo una transfusión de sangre. “Este fue el comienzo de una vida de hospitalización, dolor y tratamiento”, dijo Taylor-Oates.

Habló con la Dra. Bhatia sobre las opciones de tratamiento. “Yo considero que sea un miembro de la familia”, dijo. Cuando Taylor-Oates estaba embarazada de su segundo hijo, Brandon, ella se enteró del programa de conexión entre hermanos.

Si su hijo nacía sin la enfermedad, él podría donar su médula ósea a su hermano. Estadísticamente, sólo había un 14 por ciento de posibilidades de que la médula ósea de Brandon fuese una combinación perfecta.

“It was a battle,” said mother Tiffany Taylor-Oates with Bryce (on her lap) and Brandon (left)
“Fue una batalla”, dijo la madre Tiffany Taylor-Oates con Bryce (en su regazo) y Brandon (a la izquierda).

Resultó que lo era.

Su marido estaba renuente todavía. Pasaron por cinco meses de terapia en el hospital para decidir qué hacer. “Él no quería hacerlo”, dijo. “Fue una batalla”.

La Dra. Bhatia dijo que los trasplantes de médula ósea tienen una tasa de curación del 90 por ciento, pero Oates estaba todavía en la raya.

Ella le dijo a la pareja de Fordham Road que los trasplantes de médula ósea entre hermanos son muy seguros, pero hay riesgos. Había una pequeña posibilidad de que el cuerpo pudiera rechazar las células del donante.

Con donantes no relacionados, el riesgo aumenta. Los pacientes podrían sufrir la enfermedad injerto contra huésped, en la que las células del donante atacan los órganos del huésped y causan daños. La Dra. Bhatia también dijo que un trasplante de médula ósea era la única manera de curar a su hijo.

Como el Dr. Andrew Kung, director de Hematología Pediátrica, Oncología y Trasplante de Células Madre en el Hospital de Niños Morgan Stanley explicó: “El trasplante sustituye las células que forman la sangre en el cuerpo con las células que forman la sangre de otra persona. Siempre y cuando el donante no tenga la enfermedad de células falciformes, el paciente después de un trasplante de médula ósea contará con un sistema totalmente normal para la formación de sangre. Es por eso que decimos que el trasplante es la única opción curativa y utilizamos el término cura precisamente en ese sentido”.

"Es la enfermedad genética más común en el país", dijo la doctora Monica Bhatia, Directora Pediátrica de Trasplante de Médula ósea.
“Es la enfermedad genética más común en el país”, dijo la doctora Monica Bhatia, Directora Pediátrica de Trasplante de Médula ósea.

Una vez que Oates estaba convencido de los beneficios, otra batalla para el tratamiento de Bryce comenzó. Su seguro le negó la cobertura.

“Seguí luchando”, dijo Taylor-Oates. Pero por dentro estaba devastada. No quería que nadie lo supiera, sobre todo su marido. Le tomó tanto tiempo convencerlo que no quería darle una razón para dar marcha atrás.

“Pero por la noche, lloraba. En el trabajo, lloraba. En cualquier momento silencioso, lloraba. No podía creer que alguien pudiera negarle a nuestro hijo el derecho a vivir”, dijo. “Fue todo negocios y dinero para ellos al final del día”.

Las compañías de seguros se utilizan para cubrir los tratamientos estándar, dijo el Dr. Kung. Unos 650 trasplantes de médula ósea para la enfermedad de células falciformes se han realizado en los Estados Unidos durante los últimos 15 años. “Así como estamos tratando de educar a los pacientes en el evento de hoy, tenemos que educar a las aseguradoras también. Esta no es la manera estándar en que la enfermedad de células falciformes se trata en todo el país. Pero esta es la manera en que la enfermedad será tratada en el futuro”.

Keirol La Barrie, now 12, had a bone marrow transplant in 2006.
Keirol La Barrie, ahora de 12 años, tuvo un trasplante de médula ósea en el 2006.

El trabajador social del hospital trabajó con Taylor-Oates para encontrar una compañía de seguros que tuviera antecedentes de cubrir el procedimiento.

Cuatro días después de que Taylor-Oates cambió su compañía de seguros, se aprobó el procedimiento.

El hijo de Carol y Anthony La Barrie, Keirol, fue diagnosticado con la enfermedad de células falciformes cuando tenía tres meses de edad. En su país nativo, Trinidad, los niños con la enfermedad sólo viven hasta los 14 años.

“Es como una sentencia de muerte”, dijo el señor La Barrie.

Su médico en el Hospital Brookdale de Brooklyn, el Dr. Kenneth Rivlin, recomendó que fueran al hospital New York-Presbyterian para un trasplante de médula ósea. El hermano de Keirol, Keiquon, resultó ser una combinación perfecta.

El procedimiento consiste en una semana de quimioterapia para la ablación de la médula ósea existente. Keirol perdió su cabello. Tenía que tomar esteroides y se hinchó como un globo. Su piel se oscureció y de repente parecía mucho mayor. “Fue aterrador”, dijo su madre. El trasplante de médula ósea -administrado por vía intravenosa- tomó cerca de una hora.

More than 100,000 people in the U.S., mostly African-Americans and Hispanics, have the disease.
Más de 100,000 personas en los Estados Unidos, en su mayoría afroamericanos e hispanos, tienen la enfermedad.

Después del trasplante, Keirol pasó tres meses en el hospital. Debido a que su sistema inmunológico estaba deprimido, se le mantuvo en aislamiento. Su madre se quedó con él la mayor parte del tiempo, pero casi todo el mundo tenía que visitarlo detrás de puertas de vidrio. La hija mayor se hizo cargo de los otros cuatro hijos. Keiquon, quien todavía era un niño, solía quedarse con su abuela. El padre de Keirol trabajaba y también estaba obteniendo su licenciatura en Baruch College. Después de trabajar y de ir a clases, iba al norte del condado a visitar a su hijo antes de ir a la casa de su familia en Brooklyn.

“Fue muy estresante”, dijo su madre.

Sin embargo, un año después de su tratamiento, Keirol, Bryce e Ivanna están todos sanos.

Ya no tienen la enfermedad.

Alex Oates dijo a la audiencia que fue un proceso agotador.

“Pero como padre tienes que agarrarte fuerte”, dijo. “Tienes que estar ahí para tu hijo”.

Ofreció a otros padres su número de teléfono celular y los invitó a llamar.

“Si usted necesita ayuda, sólo llame. Vivo en el Bronx”.

Related Articles

Check Also
Close
Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker