ArtsNews

In probation, but not on pause

En probatoria, pero no en pausa

In probation, but not on pause

Poetry emerges at the NeON Center

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


Free Verse poets read at the South Bronx Neighborhood Opportunity Network (NeON) Center.
Free Verse poets read at the South Bronx Neighborhood Opportunity Network (NeON) Center.

Probation officer Esteban Rivera found himself on the spot this past Thurs., Sept. 12th.

In the same office where he usually checks up on probationers and reviews their progress, he stood up in front of an audience of several dozen people and did the unexpected at the South Bronx Neighborhood Opportunity Network (NeON) Center.

He read poetry.

It was his own poem, one he’d written about stop-and-frisk. His badge was hanging visibly off his belt as he flipped the pages of his notebook and delivered his verses.

“[Writing] is a very therapeutic process,” he said afterwards. “I picked it up when I was younger. Everyone else was rapping, but I was no good at keeping the beat, so I decided to write poetry.”

One of Rivera’s clients, Tarrell Brooks, was surprised to walk into the center and see his officer reciting poetry.

“By looking at him, I wouldn’t think he did poetry,” Brooks later admitted, clearly impressed.

Rivera said his poem, called “Summertime,” was based on the collective experience of his clients who have been stopped and frisked.

“It’s a celebration of life,” said NeON’s Poet-in-Residence Dave Johnson of Free Verse.
“It’s a celebration of life,” said NeON’s Poet-in-Residence Dave Johnson of Free Verse.

Brooks doesn’t write poetry, but he does like to rap.

He is now considering trying a new medium.

“Poetry is just rap without the beat,” he said.

Brooks would be in the right place at NeON to experiment with a new artistic form. It is here that dozens of South Bronx probationers have found out they were poets, though they didn’t know it.

Over the past six months, a revolution of words and rhymes has been cultivated in the waiting room of the NeON center at 198 East 161st Street. The probationers, community members, probation officers, NeON volunteers and workers who have united to become the Department of Probation’s first poetry group capped months of hard work with the release of Free Verse, a poetry compilation that will be distributed throughout the city’s probation centers.

Last Thursday, the South Bronx NeON, which was remodeled and reopened on Sept. 12 of last year, celebrated its first-year anniversary and the release of Free Verse with a poetry reading.

The décor of the center now resembles the café of a student’s union more than it does a probation office, thanks to the motivational messages, images, and bright colors that have graced its walls.

But bringing visual brightness was only Phase One in Lonni Tanner’s overall vision for sprucing up the NeON. Tanner is the Chief Change Officer of the New York City Department of Design and Construction, and oversaw the center’s revamping.

“[Writing] is a very therapeutic process,” said probation officer Esteban Rivera, together with Tarrell Brooks.
“[Writing] is a very therapeutic process,” said probation officer Esteban Rivera, together with Tarrell Brooks.
“The idea was to do something crazy after we changed the place up,” she said.

To add to the center’s novel features, Tanner wants to add an artisan market place in the near future.

“This is about the unexpected,” she emphasized.

The probation office got its first Poet-in-Residence in Dave Johnson, a professor at The New School, who would approach those at NeON bearing poetry.

Johnson recalled the first time he came to the probation office.

“In the beginning, there was a little resistance,” he said. “People were like, ‘Who are you and what do you want?’ You have some people who are too cool.”

But participants opened up when they realized that Johnson just wanted to share some poetry with them. He brought copies of poems by Pablo Neruda, Audre Lorde, Charles Bukowski. Neruda, the exiled Chilean poet, Lorde, the Harlem activist, and Bukowski, who was jokingly dubbed the “Laureate of American lowlife” are what Johnson calls the “poets of the people.”

The publication was celebrated with cake.
The publication was celebrated with cake.

Soon after, people were writing their own verses and a weekly poetry group was formed. Johnson served as its Editor-in-Chief.

At its nucleus were probationers, probation officers, the center’s volunteers, community members and the center’s employees.

On Thursdays, they had Open Mic readings, which were broadcast on televisions in the South Bronx NeON and in service centers all over New York City.

And despite the initial resistance, the probationers have since taken up the form with enthusiasm.

Tahana Lilly, who is currently in her second year of probation, has started writing her own memoir; its working title is How I Came to Be. She wrote a poem of the same name, which was published in Free Verse.

She has also started her own clothing label: Free Verse Labels.

She will sell t-shirts and hats at the Silent Rock Church in the Bronx.

“The idea was to do something crazy,” said Lonni Tanner, the Chief Change Officer of the New York City Department of Design and Construction.
“The idea was to do something crazy,” said Lonni Tanner, the Chief Change Officer of the New York City Department of Design and Construction.

“It all started naturally,” she said of her work.

Lilly has to serve five years of probation.

“I was involved with a guy, and got caught up with what he was doing,” she explained.

“When I [first] got on probation, I didn’t know what they had to offer,” said Lilly.

But now, aside from delving into her writing and her clothing line, Lilly is also taking GED classes at the South Bronx NeON.

Sylvia Lugo has been on probation for a year, but she was unaware of the poetry club until she sauntered into the probation office this past Thursday to meet with her officer. But Lugo, who has been writing poetry since the age of 5, already had a body of work from which to draw.

On the spot, she decided to read her own poem in front of the audience.

She vowed to continue coming to the Thursday meetings.

“I love poetry. I relieve everything I have rolled inside. It all comes out better when I write it,” she said.

“It’s developed our clients in so many ways,” said Branch Chief Tim Salyer, with volunteer and poet Cheryl Brown.
“It’s developed our clients in so many ways,” said Branch Chief Tim Salyer, with volunteer and poet Cheryl Brown.

Cheryl Brown, a mother of a probationer, who also volunteers at the center, read her poem, “Firefly”. Brown said she had noticed a marked difference in the ambience of the waiting room since the poetry group started.

“The probationers are more free to express themselves when they’re sitting here,” she said. “It brings people together.”

Because the wait time can often last as long as three hours, spending the time productively and creatively is key.

Tim Salyer, who is the Branch Chief, has also observed the beneficial effects of poetry on the overall atmosphere of the center.

“It’s developed our clients in so many ways. They’re therapeutically able to express thoughts and emotions in a positive manner. It’s becoming a lifestyle.”

“This is about finding your way back to the community,” said Professor Johnson.

For him and the other poets, the day’s event was more than a salute to poetry.

“It’s a celebration of life,” he said.

For more on the Free Verse collection, please visit www.nyc.gov/html/prob/downloads/pdf/free_verse.pdf.

En probatoria, pero no en pausa

La poesía en el Centro NeON

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


Los poetas de Free Verse leen sus poemas en el Centro ‘Neighborhood Opportunity Network’ (NeON, por sus siglas en ingles).
Los poetas de Free Verse leen sus poemas en el Centro ‘Neighborhood Opportunity Network’ (NeON, por sus siglas en ingles).

El oficial de probatoria Esteban Rivera se encontró haciendo lo inesperado este el pasado jueves, 12 de septiembre.

En la misma oficina en el ‘Neighborhood Opportunity Network’ en el Sur del Bronx (NeON) donde normalmente el revisa la libertad condicional, se puso de pie frente a una audiencia de varias docenas de personas y los sorprendio.

Leyó un poema.

Era su propio poema, uno que escribió acerca de detenga-y-cateo.

Su placa estaba colgando visiblemente de su correa mientras pasaba las páginas de su libreta y decía sus versos.

“Escribir es un proceso bien terapéutico”, dijo después. “Lo hice cuando era más joven. Todo el mundo estaba rapeando, pero yo no era bueno manteniendo el ritmo, así es que decidí escribir poesía”. Uno de los clientes de Rivera, Tarrell Brooks, se sorprendió al entrar al centro y ver a su oficial recitando poesía.

“Mirándolo no pensaría que hacia poesía”, admitió luego Brooks, claramente impresionado. Rivera dijo que su poema, llamado “Summertime”, estaba basado en una experiencia colectiva de sus clientes que han sido detenidos y registrados.

“It’s a celebration of life,” said NeON’s Poet-in-Residence Dave Johnson of Free Verse.
“Es una celebración de la vida”, dijo Dave Johnson, el poeta en residencia de NeON.

Brooks no escribe poesía, pero si le gusta el rap.

Ahora está considerando un nuevo medio.

“La poesía es solo rap sin el ritmo”, dijo.

Brooks estaría en el lugar correcto para experimentar con una nueva forma artística en NeON. Es aquí donde docenas de personas en probatoria han encontrado que eran poetas, aunque no lo sabían.

Durante los pasados seis meses, una revolución de palabras y ritmos han sido cultivados en la sala de espera del ‘Neighborhood Opportunity Network’ del Sur del Bronx (NeON) en el 198 Este de la Calle 161. Las personas en probatoria, miembros de la comunidad, oficiales de probatoria, voluntarios de NeON y empleados que se han unido para ser el primer grupo de poesía del Departamento de Probatoria, coronado con meses de arduo trabajo con el lanzamiento de ‘Free Verse’, una compilación de poesía que será distribuida a través de los centros de probatoria de la ciudad.

El jueves pasado, NeON del Sur del Bronx, el cual fue remodelado y reabierto el 12 de septiembre, del año pasado, celebró su primer aniversario y el lanzamiento de ‘Free Verse’ con una lectura de poesía en el suelo de la oficina de probatoria – que se asemeja a la cafetería de una unión de estudiantes más que a una oficina de probatoria, gracias a los mensajes motivadores, imágenes y brillantes colores que han adornado sus paredes.

“[Writing] is a very therapeutic process,” said probation officer Esteban Rivera, together with Tarrell Brooks.
“Escribir es un proceso bien terapéutico”, dijo el oficial de probatoria Esteban Rivera, junto a Tarrell Brooks.
Pero el llevar brillantes visual fue solo la primera fase de la visión de Lonni Tanner para arreglar NeON. Tanner es el Oficial de Cambio del Departamento de Diseño y Construcción de la ciudad de Nueva York, y supervisó la renovación del centro.

“La idea fue hacer algo loco luego de cambiar el lugar”, dijo ella.

La oficina de probatoria tuvo a su primer poeta en Dave Johnson, profesor en New School, y probablemente para el completo asombro de las personas en probatoria en el salón de espera, el se acercó a ellos llevando poesía, y no las habituales formas del salón de espera.

“Esto se trata de los inesperado”, enfatizó Tanner. Para añadir a lo inesperado Tanner desea añadir un mercado de artesanos en el centro.

Johnson recuerda la primera vez que fue a la oficina de probatoria.

“Al principio había un poco de resistencia. La gente estaba como, ‘¿Quién tu eres y que quieres?’ Tienes a personas que están bien”, para la poesía, dijo el.

The publication was celebrated with cake.
La publicación de poesía se celebró con bizcocho.

La gente se abrió cuando se dieron cuenta que Johnson solo deseaba compartir alguna poesía con ellos. Llevó copias de poemas de Pablo Neruda, Audre Lorde, Charles Bukowski. Neruda, el poeta exiliado chileno, Lorde el activista de Harlem y Bukowski, quien de broma era apodado el “laureado de la baja vida americana” a lo que Johnson llama el “poeta de la gente”.

Un poco después, la gente estaba escribiendo sus propios versos y se formó un grupo de poesía semanal. Y su núcleo era de personas en probatoria, oficiales de probatoria, voluntarios del centro, miembros de la comunidad y empleados del centro. Los jueves tienen lecturas con micrófono abierto, que se transmitieron por televisión en el NeON del Sur del Bronx y en centros de servicio por toda la ciudad de Nueva York.

Las personas en probatoria han llevado su reciente encontrada inclinación y seguido con ella.

Tahana Lilly, quien actualmente está en su segundo año de probatoria, ha comenzado a escribir sus propias memorias, cuyo título provisional es ‘How I Came To Be’. Ella escribió un poema con el mismo nombre, el cual fue publicado en ‘Free Verse’. También ha comenzado su propia línea de ropa: ‘Free Verse Labels’. Vende camisetas y sombreros en la Iglesia Silent Rock en el Bronx.

“Todo comenzó naturalmente”, dijo ella de su trabajo.

“The idea was to do something crazy,” said Lonni Tanner, the Chief Change Officer of the New York City Department of Design and Construction.
“La idea fue hacer algo loco luego de cambiar el lugar”, dijo Lonni Tanner, la Oficial de Cambio del Departamento de Diseño y Construcción.

Lilly tiene que servir cinco años de probatoria.

“Estaba envuelta con un chico, y quedé atrapada con lo que el estaba haciendo”, dijo ella.

“Cuando entré a probatoria no sabia lo que tenían para ofrecer”, dijo Lilly.

Pero ahora, además de adentrarse en su escritura y su línea de ropa, Lilly también está tomando clases de GED en el NeON del Sur del Bronx.

Sylvia Lugo ha estado en probatoria por un año, pero no sabía acerca del club de poesía hasta que estaba paseando por la oficina de probatoria el jueves para reunirse con su oficial. Pero Lugo, quien ha estado escribiendo poesía desde que tenía 5 años, ya tiene un cuerpo de trabajo al cual recurrir. Al momento decidió leer su propio poema al frente de la audiencia.

Prometió continuar asistiendo a las reuniones los jueves.

“Yo amo la poesía. Alivio todo lo que tengo adentro. Todo sale mejor cuando lo escribo”, dijo ella.

“Desarrolla a nuestros clientes en tantas maneras diferentes”, explico Tim Salyer, el Jefe de la División, con voluntaria y poeta Cheryl Brown.
“Desarrolla a nuestros clientes en tantas maneras diferentes”, explico Tim Salyer, el Jefe de la División, con voluntaria y poeta Cheryl Brown.

Cheryl Brown, madre de una persona en probatoria, quien también es voluntaria en el centro, leyó un poema, “Firefly”. Brown ha notado una marcada diferencia en el aura del salón de espera desde que comenzó el grupo de poesía.

“Las personas en probatoria son mas libres de expresarse cuando están sentados aquí. Une a las personas”, dijo ella.

Las personas en probatoria a menudo pasan hasta tres horas en el salón de espera. Tim Salyer, quien es el Jefe de la División, también ha observado los efectos beneficiosos de la poesía en la atmósfera general del centro.

“Desarrolla a nuestros clientes en tantas maneras diferentes. Están terapéuticamente capaces de expresar pensamientos y emociones en una manera positiva. Está pasando a ser un estilo de vida”.

“Esto es acerca de encontrar tu camino de vuelta a la comunidad”, dijo Johnson.

Para el y los otros poetas, el día fue mucho más que un homenaje a la poesía.

“Es una celebración de la vida”, dijo.

Para más sobre la colección Free Verse, favor visite www.nyc.gov/html/prob/downloads/pdf/free_verse.pdf.

Related Articles

Check Also
Close
Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker