In hot water
En aguas calientes

  • English
  • Español

In hot water

Optimism and practicality at work with solar thermal systems

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“It’s just water being heated by the sun.” So explain proponents of solar thermal systems.

“It’s just water being heated by the sun.” So explain proponents of solar thermal systems.

On the roof of Saint Mary’s Recreation Center at 450 Saint Ann’s Avenue are rows and rows of glass tubes, glinting in the sun.

They serve a dual purpose – one aspirational, and one practical.

These tubes are the major feature in solar thermal systems, and the work which they represent is one of optimists hoping for a new future, one in which the heavy use of fossil fuels by the United States can be curbed.

But the tubes are more than pipe dreams.

They are hard workers – as they provide heat for the recreation center’s bathrooms and showers and its pool, which uses 136,000 gallons of water.

There are 25 panels and each contains glass 20 tubes that function as thermoses; the glass outer layers form a vacuum that locks in the heat of the sun to heat water.

This system provides all the hot water at Saint Ann’s RecreationCenter, including that of its pool.

This system provides all the hot water at Saint Mary’s Recreation Center, including that of its pool.

While the tubes are inert, the water inside them is in constant motion, being pumped in by pipes attached to one side of the panels, and pumped out of another pipe on the other side. The pipes delivering water to and from the tubes are sloped so the water drains down into the pool as an effect of simple gravity. The water drains through a condensed boiler before it is piped to the pool.

On a hot day and in a few minutes, the water can reach over 500 degrees if left stagnant. But, the water will never reach over 212 degrees; letting that happen would mean the tubes would explode.

The system is connected to a control panel in the facility’s basement. The panel monitors the water’s temperature and turns off the flow if it heats up to over 190 degrees Fahrenheit.

The solar thermal system was installed as part of the PlaNYC’s initiative to decrease municipal government carbon emissions by 30 percent of its 2006 levels by 2017.

The decision and planning behind the project was a collaboration between the Department of Citywide Administrative Services (DCAS), the New York Power Authority (NYPA) and the Parks Department.

“It will help the environment,” said Doug Falkenburg, the principal of Ely Beach Solar, which installed the system.

“It will help the environment,” said Doug Falkenburg, the principal of Ely Beach Solar, which installed the system.

PlaNYC’s goal is to reduce the entire city’s carbon emissions by 30 percent by 2030.

Doug Falkenburg, the principal of Ely Beach Solar, the company that installed the system, believes that solar thermal systems will be the future in dense urban areas, more so than solar panels, which require more space for less output.

“I was flying over La Guardia and I saw all these flat roofs,” he said, explaining a moment of inspiration. Each flat roof is a potential home for a solar thermal system.

Saint Mary’s Pool, situated in Saint Ann’s Park, has a flat, open roof with plenty of sun exposure, and is unique in its energy needs.

“The majority of energy use at Saint Mary’s Recreation Center is for heating the indoor pool year round and providing hot water in the showers. A photovoltaic system produces electricity while a solar thermal system produces heat. A photovoltaic system would require the electricity produced by the system to be then converted to heat for the pool water. A solar thermal system, which converts solar energy directly to thermal energy, is the best solution to reducing the cost of heating at this location,” explained Ebong Ukpong, the NYPA engineer behind the project.

In addition to the solar thermal system, Ely Beach Solar also installed a compressed boiler which operates at up to 95 percent efficiency and works in conjunction with the solar thermal system.

In addition to the system at Saint Mary’s Pool, Falkenburg has other solar thermal projects in mind. He estimates a solar thermal system at the Metro Transit Authority’s train yards at Broadway and 207th Street, which covers several blocks, would deliver a clean source of hot water for all of Inwood, he estimates.

The panels and pipes delivering water to and from the tubes are slanted so gravity can deliver water to the pool below.

The panels and pipes delivering water to and from the tubes are slanted so gravity can deliver water to the pool below.

A similar set up at the Hunts Point Terminal Market could also provide hot water for much of the surrounding residential area.

According to Falkenburg, it would only take one and a half of the panels to provide enough hot water for a family of four.

In contrast, he estimates that it would take 2,300 gallons of oil a year, or 2,600 cubic feet of natural gas to provide the same service. The solar thermal system can also provide interior heating, but it works best with radiant heat or steam heat.

There is an additional bonus: “Once you install it, it’s free heat.”

John Loli, the project manager for the Department of Citywide Administrative Services, which pays the city’s heating bills, estimated that the recreation center will save $38,000 a year on gas alone.

It is not an inexpensive step.

The system cost $700,000 to install, including materials and labor.

In the belly of the boiler room, hot water from the roof combines with cooler water destined for the pool.

In the belly of the boiler room, hot water from the roof combines with cooler water destined for the pool.

But the payoff, say solar thermal proponents, is a rather long lifespan.

“The tubes can last forever,” said Loli.

And when solar thermal systems are installed, gas and oil boilers are still kept for a rainy days, literally. While solar thermal systems work in all types of temperatures, they won’t be able to function on cloudy days. The solar thermal system at Saint Mary’s Pool has a tank that stores hot water in case of cloudy days, but in the case of consecutive sunless days, the gas and oil burners can serve as a backup.

Falkenburg insists that the solar thermal systems are not just a matter of economics.

In the belly of the boiler room, hot water from the roof combines with cooler water destined for the pool.

This tank stores hot water for cloudy days.

“It will help the environment. I believe climate change is a real problem. It’s not theoretical, and it’s happening fast,” he said.

DCAS has 4,000 properties in its portfolio, and the solar thermal system at Saint Mary’s was its first installation. Only time will tell how many more such sustainable projects will come to fruition. In the meantime, DCAS will closely monitor the solar thermal system at Saint Mary’s.

“We want to see how it performs,” before implementing it elsewhere, said Emily Small, the Chief of Staff of DCAS’s energy management systems.

While solar thermal systems are a novelty in the United States, Europe has been using the technology for over a century. While only a handful solar thermal projects grace New York City rooftops, they are already a big part of the cityscapes of other countries.

“You look at the rooftops in India and they all have solar thermal. If they didn’t have solar thermal, they wouldn’t have hot water because there’s a scarcity of oil and gas. They have hot water, even though they have ten power outages a day,” said Matt Brown, the energy manager at the Parks Department.

Brown doesn’t see any reason why more solar thermal systems can’t be part of the foreseeable future.

“It’s a simple technology; it’s just water being heated by the sun. Anyone that has roof access to the sun, and use for hot water, could use solar thermal.”

En aguas calientes

Optimismo y sentido práctico en el trabajo con los sistemas termales

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“It’s just water being heated by the sun.” So explain proponents of solar thermal systems.

“Es solo agua siendo calentada por el sol”. Explican los defensores de los sistemas térmicos solares.

En el techo del Centro Recreativo de Saint Mary en el 450 de la Avenida Saint Ann hay filas y filas de tubos de vidrio, brillando en el sol.

Sirven para un doble propósito – uno, inspiración y otro práctico.

Estos tubos son la característica principal en los sistemas térmicos, y el trabajo que estos representan es uno de optimismo esperando un nuevo futuro, uno en el cual puede poner freno al intenso uso de combustible fósil por parte de los Estados Unidos.

Pero los tubos son más que tubos de sueño.

Son fuertes trabajadores – ya que proveen calor a los baños del centro recreativo y las duchas, y su piscina, la cual utiliza 136,000 galones de agua.

Hay 25 paneles y cada uno contiene 20 tubos de vidrio que funcionan como termos; las capas de vidrio exteriores forman un vacío que encierra el calor del sol para calentar el agua.

This system provides all the hot water at Saint Ann’s RecreationCenter, including that of its pool.

El sistema provee toda el agua caliente en el Centro Recreativo Saint Ann, incluyendo la de la piscina.

Mientras que los tubos están inertes, el agua dentro de ellos está en constante movimiento, siendo pompeada por tubos conectados a un lado de los paneles, y pompeados por otro tubo en el otro lado. Los tubos llevan agua hacia y desde, los tubos están inclinados para que el agua drene hasta la piscina como un simple efecto de gravedad. El agua se drena a través de una caldera de condensación antes de ser canalizada a la piscina.

En un día caliente y en pocos minutos, el agua puede alcanzar más de 500 grados si se deja estancada. Pero el agua nunca llegará a más de 212 grados; dejando que eso suceda significaría que los tubos explotarían.

El sistema está conectado a un panel de control en el sótano de la facilidad. El panel monitorea la temperatura del agua y apaga el flujo si se calienta a más de 190 grados Fahrenheit.

El sistema solar térmico fue instalado como parte de la iniciativa PlaNYC para disminuir las emisiones de carbón del gobierno municipal en un 30 por ciento de sus niveles en el 2006 hasta el 2017.

“It will help the environment,” said Doug Falkenburg, the principal of Ely Beach Solar, which installed the system.

“Ayudaría al ambiente”, dijo Doug Falkenburg, principal de Ely Beach Solar, la cual instaló el sistema.

La decisión y planificación detrás del proyecto fue una colaboración entre el Departamento de Servicios Administrativos de la Ciudad (DCAS, por sus siglas en inglés), la Autoridad de Energía de Nueva York (NYPA, por sus siglas en inglés) y el Departamento de Parques.

La meta de PlaNYC es el reducir las emisiones de carbón de la ciudad en su totalidad a un 30 por ciento para el 2030.

Doug Falkenburg, principal de Ely Beach Solar, la compañía que instaló el sistema, cree que los sistemas solares térmicos serán el futuro en densas áreas urbanas, más que los paneles solares, los cuales requieren más espacio por menos rendimiento.

“Estaba volando sobre La Guardia y vi todos estos techos planos”, dijo, explicando un momento de inspiración. Cada techo plano es un potencial hogar para un sistema solar térmico.

La piscina Saint Mary, situada en el Parque Saint Ann, tiene un techo plano y abierto con suficiente exposición al sol, y es único en sus necesidades de energía.

“La mayoría de la energía utilizada en el Centro Recreativo Saint Mary es para calentar la piscina interior todo el año y proveer agua caliente en las duchas. Un sistema fotovoltaico produce electricidad mientras que un sistema solar térmico produce energía. Un sistema fotovoltaico requiere la electricidad producida por el sistema para entonces ser convertida en calor para el agua de la piscina. Un sistema solar térmico, el cual convierte energía solar directamente a energía térmica, es la mejor solución para reducir el costo de calefacción en este lugar”, explicó Ebong Ukpong, el ingeniero de NYPA detrás del proyecto.

Además del sistema solar térmico, Ely Beach Solar también instaló una caldera comprimida la cual opera a un 95 por ciento de efectividad y trabaja en conjunto con el sistema solar térmico.

The panels and pipes delivering water to and from the tubes are slanted so gravity can deliver water to the pool below.

Los paneles y tubos que llevan agua hacia y desde a los tubos están inclinados para que la gravedad pueda llevar el agua a la piscina.

Además del sistema en la piscina Saint Mary, Falkenburg tiene otros proyectos solares térmicos en mente. Estima un sistema solar térmico en los patios de los trenes de la Autoridad de Metro Tránsito en Broadway y la Calle 207, la cual cubre varios bloques, llevaría una limpia fuente de agua caliente para todo Inwood, estima el.

Un arreglo similar en la Terminal del Mercado Hunts Point también podría proveer agua caliente para muchas de las áreas residenciales que lo rodean.

Según Falkenburg, solo requeriría uno y medio de los paneles para proveer suficiente agua caliente para una familia de cuatro.

Por el contrario, estima que tomaría 2,300 galones de aceite anual, o 2,600 pies cúbicos de gas natural para proveer el mismo servicio. El sistema térmico solar también puede proveer calefacción interior, pero funciona mejor con calor radiante o calor de vapor.

Hay un bono adicional: “Una vez lo instala, es calefacción gratis”.

In the belly of the boiler room, hot water from the roof combines with cooler water destined for the pool.

Este tanque almacena agua caliente para los dias nublados.

John Loli, gerente del proyecto para el Departamento de Servicios Administrativos de la ciudad, que paga las facturas de calefacción de la ciudad, estima que el centro recreativo ahorrara $38,000 anuales solo en gas.

No es un paso costoso.

El sistema tiene un valor de $700,000 para instalarlo, incluyendo materiales y mano de obra.

Pero el resultado, dicen los defensores de solar térmico, es una vida más larga.

“Los tubos pueden durar para siempre”, dijo Loli.

Y cuando los sistemas térmicos solares son instalados, las calderas de gas y aceite todavía se mantienen para dias lluviosos, literalmente. Aunque los sistemas térmicos solares funcionan en todo tipo de temperaturas, no podrían funcionar en dias nublados. El sistema térmico solar en la piscina Saint Mary tiene un tanque que almacena agua caliente en caso de dias nublados, pero en el caso de dias nublados consecutivos, las calderas de gas y aceite sirven como reserva.

Falkenburg insiste que los sistemas térmicos solares no son solo cuestión de economía.

“Ayudaría al ambiente. Creo que el cambio de clima es un problema real. No es teórico, está sucediendo rápidamente”, dijo el.

In the belly of the boiler room, hot water from the roof combines with cooler water destined for the pool.

En el centro del cuarto de calderas, el agua caliente del techo se combina con agua fría destinada para la piscina.

DCAS tiene 4,000 propiedades en su porfolio, y el sistema térmico solar e Saint Mary fue su primera instalación. Solo el tiempo dirá cuantos proyectos más verán resultado. Mientras tanto, DCAS monitoreará de cerca el sistema térmico solar en Saint Mary.

“Queremos ver como funciona”, antes de implementarlo en otro lugar, dijo Emily Small, directora de personal de los sistemas de manejo de energía de DCAS.

Mientras que los sistemas térmicos solares son una novedad en los Estados Unidos, Europa ha estado utilizando la tecnología por más de un siglo. En Nueva York solo un puñado de proyectos térmicos solares adornan los techos de la ciudad, aunque son una gran parte de los paisajes urbanos en otras ciudades.

“Tu miras los techos en la India y todos tienen energía térmica solar. Si no tienen energía térmica solar, no tendrían agua caliente porque hay escasez de aceite y gas. Tienen agua caliente, aunque tienen diez apagones de electricidad diarios”, dijo Matt Brown, gerente de energía en el Departamento de Parques.

Brown no ve ninguna razón por la cual los sistemas térmicos solares puedan ser parte del futuro.

“Es una tecnología simple; es solo agua siendo calentada por el sol. Cualquiera que tenga acceso a un techo con sol, y utilice agua caliente, puede utilizar energía térmica solar”.