EducationHealthLocalNewsPolitics/government

In her own words
En sus propias palabras

In her own words

An advocate makes her way forward

Story by Debralee Santos
Photos by Jonathan Reznick


Of her time in Inwood, she jokes, ““I will never, ever get that much space in New York again.”
Of her time in Inwood, she jokes, ““I will never, ever get that much space in New York again.”

“Words are very, very important.”

You’d expect no less from a schoolteacher, one who thrills in days spent teaching second graders.

“They’re amazing,” she exclaims, detailing the manner in which the lot of seven-year-old children in her care daily present new ways of seeing the world, and how close-knit the community of fellow teachers, staff and families at her Bronx school is.
She proudly, and quickly, labels herself a teacher first.

When asked about being an advocate, she pauses.

“I’d like to be,” she starts quietly. “I want to speak up and be honest, and if that’s what being an ‘advocate’ is, then yes.”

Lydia Cuomo’s cautious response is a departure from her characteristically rapid-fire – and ebullient – speech.

The young woman who rarely seems at a loss for words is now fighting to turn one in particular, that of “victim,” onto its head.

Savagely raped by ex-cop Michael Peña in an Inwood courtyard in the summer of 2011 while en route to her first day at her dream job as a schoolteacher, Cuomo would go on to endure a trial that saw her perpetrator admit to oral and anal assault, while denying vaginal penetration.

In New York, a rape charge is applicable only if a victim experiences forced vaginal penetration, while anal and oral penetration are considered criminal sexual acts, with different legal consequences.

In fact, in court, Peña’s attorney Ephraim Savitt, told jurors that the accusations against Peña were “disturbing, horrifying, and to a large degree, accurate,” but argued that there had been no apparent penetration.

“He did assault her. But there is no rape here,” Savitt said then.

And it seemed the argument – and the law – would bear him out.

In March, a hung jury convicted Peña of criminal sexual act and predatory sexual assault charges, but not rape.

The decision sparked outrage.

But in June, Peña finally pleaded guilty to rape, effectively ending the need for a second trial.

He was sentenced to 10 years to life in prison, in addition to the 75 years to life to which he’d been sentenced on the earlier convictions.

“I want to speak up,” says Bronx schoolteacher Lydia Cuomo, who, after her attack, has spoken out on behalf of a measure which would redefine the crime of rape.<i>Photo: J. Reznick</i>
“I want to speak up,” says Bronx schoolteacher Lydia Cuomo, who, after her attack, has spoken out on behalf of a measure which would redefine the crime of rape.
Photo: J. Reznick

Cuomo has since championed to have the legal discrepancy remedied, and is seeking, together with elected officials and supporters, to have a “rape is rape” measure introduced – and passed – in Albany.

“Rape is a powerful word,” explains Cuomo. “Legally, we need to change the way we talk about it. I can tell you that no one assault or trauma was worse than other.”

This past month, Assemblymember Aravella Simotas re-introduced a bill in the Assembly which would seek to re-define the crimes of Rape in the First, Second and Third Degrees to include oral sexual conduct, anal sexual conduct, and aggravated sexual contact in addition to sexual intercourse as an element of rape charges.

“Common sense dictates that what happened to Lydia in this case is clearly rape,” she said.

That other state legislators, including New York State Senator Adriano Espaillat, New York State Senator Jeff Klein and even Governor Andrew Cuomo (no relation), have expressed interest in seeing the legislation passed suggests that resolving the inconsistencies may happen before session ends in June.

That Cuomo herself stood in Albany beside Assemblymember Simotas this past Tues., Feb. 12th and publicly spoke on the need for the measure lent the discussion a palpable urgency.

It also defied convention.

According to the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN), the nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization, 54% of sexual assaults go unreported to authorities.

Far fewer victims of sexual violence, even those who do seek assistance from the authorities, choose to publicly disclose their names or their identities.

As a matter of protocol, the names of victims are never released.

But while it was not a decision that Cuomo took lightly, the need to speak up began to seem inexorable.

“From the very beginning, I never had a choice as to whether my case was going to go public,” she explained. “Everyone knew about what had happened, and about the trial.”

Choosing to tell her story publicly has meant regaining a measure of control.

Cuomo has partnered with state legislators, including Assemblymember Aravella Simotas (far right) and supporters such as anti-abuse advocate Andrew Willis, on the “Rape is rape” bill: “This is something I am passionate about.”<br /><i>Photo: Office of Assemblymember Simotas</i>
Cuomo has partnered with state legislators, including Assemblymember Aravella Simotas (far right) and supporters such as anti-abuse advocate Andrew Willis, on the “Rape is rape” bill: “This is something I am passionate about.”
Photo: Office of Assemblymember Simotas

“This was the worst thing that’s ever happened to me,” she said. “I am never going to turn around and not have been raped. But I can change how I feel and how I deal with it. And I can open up a conversation about it.”

While she has since moved, Cuomo has fond memories of her time in Inwood, during which she would visit the Farmer’s Market and stop in at Indian Road Café.

She enjoyed too playing soccer and Frisbee in the park, and still misses the apartment she shared with roommates.

“I will never, ever get that much space in New York again,” she laughs. “It was the biggest apartment I’ve had. I really, really liked Inwood.”

Cuomo also lavishes praise on the police officers from the 34th Precinct who, directly upon arrival after the attack and long after, took great pains in looking after her and her family.

“They were life-savers,” she says firmly. “The level of care that we received from every one was extraordinary.”

She singles out Police Officers Rachel Stahl and Timothy Kraft, first on the scene, as “my heroes.”

“I don’t know what I would have done if the police had not come out on the scene when they did,” she adds. “I don’t know if I would have screamed, called 911 or gone home.”

Cuomo credits too her supportive network of friends and family, particularly her father, for never faltering.

“Right before I testified, he held my hand. He was the first person I saw afterwards. He has been, and is, my rock.”

Moreover, Cuomo lauds the team at the Manhattan District Attorney’s office and its Crime Victims Unit.

“They all eased me, and my family, through this horrific ordeal with such grace and poise,” she says. “They were tireless, and absolutely lovely.”

It is hard to imagine that such gracious words would be used in relation to such a vicious assault.

“This is my name; this is my story,” says Cuomo.<br /><i>Photo: J. Reznick</i>
“This is my name; this is my story,” says Cuomo.
Photo: J. Reznick

But the eloquence in her speech, like much in Cuomo’s optimistic disposition, is additional indication of her resilience.

It has been a whirlwind, she readily admits.

“It has been thrilling to be a part of the conversation, but also exhausting.”

She was glad to return to her classroom after the trip to Albany, and to surround herself with her students.

But she remains committed to validating the experience of those who have been harmed, and in compelling positive change, on her terms, with her own words.

“I am not ashamed of my attack,” she notes. “Victim? There is just so much more to me than that. Being known as Michael Peña’s victim gives him ownership of my identity, of my name. And every time I speak out, I push back. This is my name; it’s my story.”

For those wishing to lend support to the proposed changes in legislation, please visit here to sign a petition endorsed by Assemblymember Simotas and Lydia Cuomo:
www.causes.com/actions/1730352-pass-the-rape-is-rape-bill-in-new-york-and-stopabuse


“Deep Breaths”

For those struggling in the aftermath of violence, Cuomo says that while there is no easy fix, there are small steps that can help see you through:

• Be gentle to yourself.

• Let yourself feel raw, or angry.

• Crumble when you need to crumble.

• Trust you did not do anything wrong. This is not your fault.

• Take deep breaths.

• Reach out to friends and family you trust.

• Get help.

Resources

RAINN Hotline: 1.800.656.HOPE

Safe Horizon 24-hour Crime Victims Hotline: 866.689.HELP (4357)

In Spanish: 800.621.HOPE (4673)

Safe Horizon’s Rape, Sexual Assault and Incest Hotline (New York City):

212.227.3000

En sus propias palabras

Abriendo paso hacia el futuro

Historia por Debralee Santos
Fotos por Jonathan Reznick


“Las palabras son muy, muy importantes”.

No se podría esperar menos de una maestra de escuela, que se emociona en los días que pasa enseñando a 30 alumnos de segundo grado.

De su tiempo en el vecindario de Inwood, se ríe, “Yo nunca, nunca conseguiré esa cantidad de espacio en Nueva York otra vez".
De su tiempo en el vecindario de Inwood, se ríe, “Yo nunca, nunca conseguiré esa cantidad de espacio en Nueva York otra vez”.

“Son increíbles”, exclama la maestra del Bronx, detallando la forma en que el grupo de siete años de edad en su cuidado diario presentan nuevas formas de ver el mundo, y lo unida que es la comunidad de compañeros maestros, el personal y las familias en su escuela.

Con orgullo, y rápidamente, se etiqueta primero como maestra en cuanto a un sentido de la identidad.

Cuando se le pregunta acerca de ser una abogada, hace una pausa.

“Me gustaría serlo”, comienza silenciosamente. “Quiero hablar y ser honesta, y si eso es lo que significa ser una abogada, entonces sí”.

La respuesta cautelosa de Lydia Cuomo es una desviación del característico discurso de disparo rápido y exuberante.

La joven, que raramente parece perder las palabras, ahora lucha por introducir una en particular, la de “víctima”, en su cabeza.

Salvajemente violada por el ex-policía Michael Peña en un patio en Inwood en el verano de 2011, mientras se dirigía a su primer día en el trabajo de sus sueños como maestra de escuela, Cuomo soportaría un juicio en el que su agresor admitió atacarla oral y analmente, mientras que negaba la penetración vaginal.

En Nueva York, un cargo de violación sólo es aplicable si la víctima experimenta la penetración vaginal forzada, mientras que la penetración anal y oral son considerados actos sexuales criminales con consecuencias legales diferentes.

“I want to speak up,” says Bronx schoolteacher Lydia Cuomo, who, after her attack, has spoken out on behalf of a measure which would redefine the crime of rape.<i>Photo: J. Reznick</i>
Después de su ataque, maestra del Bronx Lydia Cuomo se ha pronunciado a favor de una medida en la legislatura del Estado de Nueva York que redefiniría el delito de violación.
Foto: J. Reznick

De hecho, en la corte, el abogado de Peña, Ephraim Savitt, dijo al jurado que las acusaciones contra Peña eran “inquietantes, aterradoras, y en gran medida, precisas”, pero sostuvo que no había habido penetración aparente.

“Él la atacó. Pero no hay ninguna violación aquí”, dijo Savitt entonces.

Y parecía que el argumento -y la ley- lo llevarían a él y a su cliente fuera.

En marzo pasado, un jurado dividido condenó a Peña por acto sexual criminal y cargos abusivos de agresión sexual, pero no por violación.

La decisión provocó indignación.

Pero en junio, Peña finalmente se declaró culpable de la violación, lo que puso fin a la necesidad de un segundo juicio.

Fue condenado de 10 años a cadena perpetua, además de los 75 años a cadena perpetua a los que había sido condenado anteriormente.

Cuomo ha luchado desde entonces por remediar la discrepancia legal y busca, junto con los funcionarios electos y simpatizantes, introducir un proyecto de ley de “violación es violación” -y que sea aprobado- en Albany.

“Violación es una palabra poderosa”, explica Cuomo. “Legalmente, tenemos que cambiar nuestra forma de hablar [de ella]. Les puedo decir que ningún ataque o trauma es peor que otro”.

La semana pasada, la asambleísta Aravella Simotas reintrodujo un proyecto de ley en la Asamblea que tratará de volver a definir los delitos de violación en primero, segundo y tercer grado para incluir una conducta sexual oral, conducta sexual anal y el contacto sexual con agravantes, además de la relación sexual, como elementos de cargos de violación.

“El sentido común nos dice que lo que le pasó a Lydia en este caso es claramente una violación”, dijo.

Legisladores de otros estados, entre ellos el senador estatal de Nueva York Adriano Espaillat, el senador estatal de Nueva York Jeff Klein, e incluso el gobernador Andrew Cuomo (sin parentesco) han expresado su interés en que se apruebe la ley, sugiriendo que la resolución de las discrepancias pueda suceder antes de que la sesión termine en junio.

Que Cuomo se mantuviera en Albany junto a la asambleísta Simotas el pasado martes 12 de febrero y hablara públicamente sobre la necesidad de la medida, abrió el debate de una urgencia palpable.

También desafió las convenciones.

Cuomo has partnered with state legislators, including Assemblymember Aravella Simotas (far right) and supporters such as anti-abuse advocate Andrew Willis, on the “Rape is rape” bill: “This is something I am passionate about.”<br /><i>Photo: Office of Assemblymember Simotas</i>
Cuomo se ha asociado con legisladores estatales, incluyendo la asambleísta Aravella Simotas, en el proyecto de ley: “Violación es violación”. “Esto es algo que me apasiona”.

Según la Red de Violación, Abuso e Incesto (RAINN por sus siglas en inglés), la organización más grande de la nación contra la violencia sexual, el 54% de las agresiones sexuales no son denunciadas a las autoridades.

Muchas menos víctimas de violencia sexual, incluso aquellas que buscan ayuda de las autoridades, deciden revelar públicamente sus nombres o sus identidades.
Como una cuestión de protocolo, los nombres de las víctimas nunca son publicados.
Pero si bien no fue una decisión que tomó a la ligera Cuomo, la necesidad de hablar empezó a parecer inexorable.

“Desde el principio nunca tuve la opción de decidir si mi caso iba a hacerlo público”, explicó. “Todo el mundo sabía lo que había pasado y sabía sobre el juicio.”

Elegir contar su historia en público ha significado la recuperación de una medida de control.

“Esto ha sido lo peor que me ha pasado”, dijo. “Nunca voy a dar media vuelta y no haber sido violada. Pero puedo cambiar lo que siento y cómo me ocupo de esto. Y puedo abrir una conversación al respecto”.

Aunque ella se mudó desde entonces, Cuomo tiene buenos recuerdos de su tiempo en Inwood, durante el cual visitaba el mercado de agricultores y se detenía en el Café Indian Road.

Le gustaba también jugar al fútbol y frisbee en el parque, y sigue sin ver el departamento que compartía con sus compañeros de cuarto.

“Yo nunca, nunca conseguiré esa cantidad de espacio en Nueva York otra vez”, dice riendo. “Ha sido el departamento más grande que haya tenido. Realmente me gustó Inwood”.

Cuomo también prodiga elogios a los policías de la comisaría 34 quienes, desde que llegó del ataque y mucho tiempo después, se esmeraron en cuidar de ella y de su familia.

“Fueron salvavidas”, dice con firmeza. “El nivel de atención que recibimos de cada uno fue extraordinario”.

Ella señala a los oficiales de policía Rachel Stahl y Timothy Kraft, los primeros en la escena, como “sus héroes”.

“Yo no sé lo que habría hecho si la policía no hubiera salido a la escena cuando lo hicieron”, añade. “Yo no sé si habría gritado, llamado al 911 o hubiera ido a casa”.

Cuomo también da crédito a su red de apoyo de amigos y familiares, especialmente a su padre, ya que nunca se tambaleó.

“Justo antes de que yo testificara, me tomó la mano. Él fue la primera persona que vi después. Ha sido, y es, mi roca”.

“This is my name; this is my story,” says Cuomo.<br /><i>Photo: J. Reznick</i>
“Este es mi nombre, esta es mi historia”, dice Cuomo.
Foto: J. Reznick

Además, Cuomo elogia al equipo de la oficina del fiscal de Manhattan y su Unidad de Víctimas del Crimen.

“Todos me aliviaron, y a mi familia, a través de esta terrible experiencia con tal gracia y aplomo”, dice ella. “Fueron incansables y absolutamente encantadores.”

Es difícil imaginar que esas palabras llenas de gracia se usen en relación con un ataque violento.

Pero la elocuencia en su discurso, como gran parte de la disposición optimista de Cuomo, es una indicación adicional de su capacidad de recuperación.

Ha sido un torbellino, admite.

“Ha sido emocionante ser parte de la conversación, pero también agotador.”

Ella se alegró de regresar a su salón de clases después del viaje a Albany, y rodearse de sus estudiantes.

Pero ella está comprometida con la validación de la experiencia de aquellos que han sido afectados, y convence, con un cambio positivo en sus términos, con sus propias palabras.

“Yo no me avergüenzo de mi ataque”, señala. “¿Víctima? Simplemente hay mucho más en mí que eso. Ser conocida como la víctima de Michael Peña le da la propiedad de mi identidad, de mi nombre. Y cada vez que hablo, me empuja hacia atrás. Este es mi nombre, es mi historia”.

Para aquellos que deseen apoyar los cambios propuestos en la legislación, por favor visiten aquí para firmar una petición respaldada por la Asambleísta Simotas y Lydia Cuomo: www.causes.com/actions/1730352-pass-the-rape-is-rape-bill-in-new-york-and-stopabuse


“Respira”

Para aquellos que luchan contra las secuelas de la violencia, Cuomo dice que, si bien no hay una solución fácil, hay pequeños pasos que pueden ayudar a superarlo:

• Sé amable contigo mismo.

• Permítete sentirte molesto o enojado.

• Derrúmbate cuando necesites hacerlo.

• Confía en que no hiciste nada mal. Esto no es tu culpa.

• Respira profundamente.

• Contacta a amigos y familiares de confianza.

• Consigue ayuda.

Recursos:

RAINN Hotline: 1.800.656.HOPE

Hotline de 24 horas, Safe Horizon, para víctimas de un crimen: 866.689.HELP (4357)

En español: 800.621.HOPE (4673)

Hotline de Safe Horizon para violación, ataque sexual e incesto (Ciudad de Nueva York): 212.227.3000

Related Articles

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker