Homecoming for an icon
Bienvenida a un Ícono

  • English
  • Español

Homecoming for an icon

Story and video by Sherry Mazzocchi
Photos by QPHOTONYC

There’s not one thing that makes West Side Story one of the greatest movies ever made. But the audience at United Palace on Sunday all agreed: Rita Moreno steals the show.

“I have some warm memories,” says screen and stage icon Rita Moreno of her childhood in Washington Heights.

“I have some warm memories,” says screen and stage icon Rita Moreno of her childhood in Washington Heights.

People lined up around the block on Sun., Feb. 23rd to see the film on the United Palace’s huge screen. The 3,400-seat movie theater was nearly full.

And how could it not be?

Moreno herself in attendance. She chatted on stage with another Tony-winner, Lin-Manuel Miranda, creator of In the Heights fame, before the show. Miranda also contributed translations for the 2009 revival of West Side Story.

The audience cheered as scenes depicting Anita (Moreno) and Bernardo (George Chakiris) dancing mambo in the gym and debating the charms of América on the roof flashed past. City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and local Councilmember Ydanis Rodriguez also paid tribute to the icon on-stage.

Moreno was interviewed by Lin-Manuel Miranda.

Moreno was interviewed by Lin-Manuel Miranda.

Moreno won an Academy Award and the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress for her work in the film.

The star is no stranger to Washington Heights. Her mother brought her from Puerto Rico the United States mainland as a child and eventually they settled in an apartment at 715 West180th Street.

She sat on the fire escape, looked at the stars and dreamt.

“I have some warm memories,” she told The Manhattan Times before the film. “I have some terrible memories too, because this is where I learned about racial prejudice very early in life.”

Moreno never went to the Palace as a child. Instead, she spent Saturdays one block north at the RKO Coliseum. She ate Nedick’s hotdogs and stayed all day, watching movies over and over again. She saw Gone With the Wind there.

“Saturdays were like a religious holiday for me. Movies—that’s what I loved,” she said.

Movies loved her back. After working with her in The King and I, the director and choreographer Jerome Robbins wanted Moreno to play Anita in West Side Story.

The film was a screen adaptation of the 1957 Broadway musical, with a score by Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim and a book by Arthur Laurents.

Moreno visited the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance (NoMAA), including Board Secretary and The Manhattan Times publisher Luis Miranda, NoMAA Executive Director Sandra García-Betancourt and In the Heights creator Lin-Manuel Miranda

Moreno visited the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance (NoMAA), including Board Secretary and The Manhattan Times publisher Luis Miranda, In the Heights creator Lin-Manuel Miranda and NoMAA Executive Director Sandra García-Betancourt

But Moreno hadn’t danced in 10 years.

“That’s like never having danced at all,” she said. “You don’t even have muscle memory.”

She flung herself into dancing, signing up for classes all day, every day, for a month to prepare for the audition.

Moreno was recognized by Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez and City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito.

Moreno was recognized by Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez and City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito.

“I nearly killed myself,” she said. A friend of hers had been out on a tour of West Side Story. Moreno asked if she’d teach her the steps.

Her friend said yes, but warned that the moves might not be the same ones in the audition. “You don’t know what they are going to teach you,” she said. Moreno learned the steps to América and the group dance at the gym.

At the audition, she was taught the same steps. Afterwards, Robbins called his assistant and asked how Moreno performed. It was clear she hasn’t danced in awhile, reported the assistant, but she was vivacious and had a great sense of style and exuberance.

“I think we can beat it out of her,” he said. “But you know what’s really amazing? She learned so fast.”

The Hispanic actors in the film wore dark brown make up.

Robbins wanted them to all be the same tobacco-brown color. He even insisted that some of the Jets bleach their hair blond.

“He wanted a really big contrast – as though the audience was so stupid that they couldn’t get it – that somebody could be Latino and not necessarily be brown or black or whatever,” she said.

It angered Moreno. She told her make-up man that Puerto Ricans range in hue from blue-eyed blondes to pitch black hair and skin.

“They’re everything,” she said. “He immediately concluded that I had a racial bias.”

After the movie came out, she didn’t get a lot fan mail from the Latino community. “I realized why many years later,” she said. “We didn’t have history of fan mail at that time,” she said.

And it’s difficult to lure Latinos to the theater. While doing a show based on her life in Berkeley, California, she promoted it on all of the Hispanic TV networks. Eventually Latino audiences trickled in after word of mouth spread. “They aren’t theater-goers,” she said. “Thank God for Lin-Manuel because he’s re-awakened the theater for Hispanic people.”

Dancers performed before the West Side Story screening at the United Palace.

Dancers performed before the West Side Story screening at the United Palace.

Moreno, 82, is beautiful and exuberant as ever. Her mantle is crowded with the Oscar she won for West Side Story, as well as two Emmys, a Tony, a Grammy, and just recently, a SAG Life Achievement Award.

She is also a New York Times bestselling author, having published her memoirs in Rita Moreno: A Memoir, in which such luminaries as Marlon Brando, Elvis Presley and John F. Kennedy appear.

Recently, she starred in the TV series, Happily Divorced with Fran Drescher and is working on a new project with Amy Poehler.

Mike Fitelson, Executive Director of the United Palace of Cultural Arts.

Mike Fitelson, Executive Director of the United Palace of Cultural Arts.

“I’d rather eat glass than stop working,” she said.

As for West Side Story, Moreno is surprised at the movie’s longevity.

“Who knew it would still be playing after 52 years?” she said.

West Side Story’s opening in 1961 had reserved seating and the tickets were priced at the hefty sum of $5.00.

“George, we’re screwed,” she recalled telling her handsome co-star. “Nobody’s going to pay that kind of money.”

While it was a brilliant film, she couldn’t imagine people paying that much to see a musical with operatic singing and costumes without sequins and spangles.

“It’s not going to happen,” she said. “I depressed the hell out of George.”

52 years later, people are still paying. And cheering.

Bienvenida a un Ícono

Historia y video por Sherry Mazzocchi
Fotos por QPHOTONYC

Moreno was interviewed by Lin-Manuel Miranda.

Moreno fue entrevistada por Lin-Manuel Miranda.

No se puede decir que solo una cosa hace de West Side Story una de las mejores películas realizadas. Pero el público en el United Palace el domingo estuvo de acuerdo en que Rita Moreno se roba el show.

La gente hizo una fila que dio vuelta a la manzana el domingo 23 de febrero para ver la película en la enorme pantalla del United Palace. La sala de cine de 3,400 asientos estaba casi llena.

¿Y cómo podría no estarlo?

Moreno misma asistió. Ella conversó en el escenario con otro ganador del Tony, Lin-Manuel Miranda, creador del famoso musical In the Heights, antes de que se presentara la película. Miranda también contribuyó con traducciones cuando West Side Story regresó a Broadway en el 2009.

El público aplaudía cuando aparecían escenas de Anita (Moreno) y Bernardo (George Chakiris) bailando mambo en el gimnasio y debatiendo los encantos de América en el techo de un edificio. La portavoz del Consejo, Melissa Mark-Viverito y el concejal local Ydanis Rodríguez también rindieron homenaje al ícono en el escenario.

Moreno ganó un premio de la Academia y un Globo de Oro como mejor actriz de reparto por su trabajo en la película.

La estrella no es ninguna extraña a los vecindarios del área. Su madre la trajo de Puerto Rico al territorio continental de Estados Unidos cuando era niña de cinco años, y primero se mudaron al Bronx. Finalmente, se instaló en un departamento en el 715 de la calle 180 oeste.

“I have some warm memories,” says screen and stage icon Rita Moreno of her childhood in Washington Heights.

“Tengo algunos buenos recuerdos”, dice el ícono del cine y el teatro Rita Moreno, sobre su infancia en Washington Heights.

Se sentaba en la escalera de incendios, miraba las estrellas y soñaba.

“Tengo algunos buenos recuerdos”, dijo a The Bronx Free Press en entrevista exclusive. “Tengo algunos recuerdos terribles también, porque aquí fue donde aprendí sobre los prejuicios raciales muy temprano en la vida”.

Moreno nunca fue al Palacio de niña. En cambio, pasaba los sábados una cuadra al norte en el RKO Coliseum. Ella comía perros calientes de Nedick y se quedaba todo el día, viendo películas una y otra vez. Ella vio Gone With the Wind ahí.

“Los sábados eran como una fiesta religiosa para mí. Las películas, eran lo que amaba “, dijo.

Moreno was recognized by Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez and City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito.

Moreno fue reconocida por el concejal Ydanis Rodríguez y la portavoz del Consejo, Melissa Mark-Viverito.

Las películas la amaban también. Después de trabajar con ella en The King and I, el director y coreógrafo Jerome Robbins quería que Moreno interpretara a Anita en West Side Story.

La película fue una adaptación para la pantalla del musical de 1957 de Broadway, con música de Leonard Bernstein y Stephen Sondheim y el guión de Arthur Laurents.

Pero Moreno no había bailado en 10 años.

“Eso es como no haber bailado en absoluto”, dijo. “Ni siquiera tienes memoria muscular”.

Ella se lanzó a bailar, se inscribió en clases de todo el día, todos los días, durante un mes para prepararse para la audición.

“Casi me mato”, dijo. Una amiga suya había estado en una gira de West Side Story. Moreno le pidió que le enseñara los pasos.

Su amiga dijo que sí, pero le advirtió que los movimientos podrían no ser los mismos en la audición. “No sabes lo que te van a enseñar”, dijo. Moreno aprendió los pasos para América y el grupo de baile en el gimnasio.

En la audición, le enseñaron los mismos pasos. Posteriormente, Robbins llamó a su asistente y le preguntó cómo lo había hecho Moreno realizó. Estaba claro que ella no había bailado en un tiempo, informó el asistente, pero estaba vivaz y tenía un gran sentido del estilo y la exuberancia.

“Creo que podemos marcarle el ritmo”, dijo. “Pero ¿sabe lo que es realmente increíble? Aprendió muy rápido”.

Los actores hispanos en la película llevaban maquillaje marrón oscuro.

Robbins quería que todos fuesen del mismo color tabaco marrón. Incluso insistió en que algunos de los Jets se blanquearan el pelo de rubio.

“Quería realmente un gran contraste,- como si la audiencia fuese tan estúpida que no pudiera entenderlo, que alguien pudiera ser latino y no necesariamente ser de color marrón o negro o cualquier cosa”, dijo.

Esto enfureció a Moreno. Ella le dijo a su maquillista que los puertorriqueños varían en tono, yendo de rubias de ojos azules hasta con pelo y piel negra.

Moreno visited the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance (NoMAA), including Board Secretary and The Manhattan Times publisher Luis Miranda, NoMAA Executive Director Sandra García-Betancourt and In the Heights creator Lin-Manuel Miranda

Moreno visitó la Alianza de las Artes del Norte de Manhattan (NoMAA), aqui con el secreatario e la Junta y publisher del The Manhattan Times, Luis Miranda; el creador de ‘In the Heights’, Lin-Manuel Miranda y la directora ejecutiva de NoMAA, Sandra García-Betancourt

“Tenemos de todo”, dijo. “Él de inmediato concluyó que yo tenía un sesgo racial”.

Después de que la película salió, no recibió mucha correspondencia de admiradores de la comunidad latina. “Me di cuenta por qué muchos años después”, dijo. “No teníamos antecedentes de cartas de admiradores en ese momento”, dijo.

Y es difícil atraer a los latinos al teatro. Al hacer un espectáculo basado en su vida en Berkeley, California, lo promovió en todas las cadenas de televisión hispanas. Finalmente el público latino fue llegando después de correrse la voz. “No son aficionados al teatro”, dijo. “Gracias a Dios por Lin-Manuel porque ha re-despertado el teatro para la gente hispana”.

Dancers performed before the West Side Story screening at the United Palace.

Bailarines hicieron una presentación antes de la proyección de West Side Story en el United Palace.

Moreno, de 82 años, está hermosa y exuberante como siempre. Su manto está lleno con el Oscar que ganó por West Side Story, así como dos Emmys, un Tony, un Grammy, y recientemente, un premio SAG por logros de toda una vida.

Ella también es una autor de gran éxito del New York Times, después de haber publicado sus memorias Rita Moreno: A Memoir, en las que aparecen figuras como Marlon Brando, Elvis Presley y John F. Kennedy.

Recientemente, protagonizó la serie de televisión, Happily Divorced con Fran Drescher y está trabajando en un nuevo proyecto con Amy Poehler.

Mike Fitelson, Executive Director of the United Palace of Cultural Arts.

Mike Fitelson, director ejecutivo del United Palace de Artes Culturales.

“Prefiero comer vidrio que dejar de trabajar”, dijo.

En cuanto a West Side Story, Moreno está sorprendida por como la película sigue presentándose.

“¿Quién diría que seguiría proyectándose después de 52 años?”, dijo.

Moreno comentó sobre el estreno de West Side Story en 1961 donde había asientos reservados y las entradas costaban la fuerte suma de $5 dólares.

“George, estamos jodidos”, recordó decirle a su guapo coprotagonista. “Nadie va a pagar esa cantidad de dinero”.

Si bien es una película brillante, no podía imaginar a la gente pagando tanto para ver un musical con canto de ópera y vestuario sin lentejuelas.

“Eso no va a pasar”, dijo. “Deprimí tanto a George”.

Pero 52 años después, la gente sigue pagando y aplaudiendo.