Forward in service
Más allá del servicio

  • English
  • Español

Forward in service

VNSNY honors members for efforts during Sandy

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

The Visiting Nurse Services of New York’ rehab services coordinator Gilbert López with his supervisor, Rosa Lea Martínez, were among those honored for extraordinary efforts.

The Visiting Nurse Services of New York’ rehab services coordinator Gilbert López with his supervisor, Rosa Lea Martínez, were among those honored for extraordinary efforts.

Gilbert López has an arthritic knee.

Still, that didn’t stop him from walking from the South Bronx to Pelham Bay Park.

But it was no athletic competition López was involved in.

Instead, on the Monday of Superstorm Sandy, that hike was the only way López, a rehabilitative services coordinator at Visiting Nurse Services of New York (VNSNY), could get to work.

“We really didn’t expect him to come in,” said his supervisor, Rosa Lea Martínez, who worked remotely from home during the storm.

But Martínez couldn’t say she was surprised when he did.

“Even in snowstorms, he’s here,” she observed, smiling.

López recalled a harrowing walk that Monday to get to work.

Light poles swayed dangerously in the relentless wind.

A darkened sky that allowed for poor visibility didn’t help.

“It was dangerous out there,” said López. “I couldn’t see in front of me.”

But he persevered in walking onward, until he could find a cab for the last leg of his journey.

And while López’s story of determination might strike some as extraordinary, it was a common tale for many members of the VNSNY team.

During Sandy, more than 5,000 home health aides, nurses, social workers, and other VNSNY staff, dispersed through all areas of the storm ravaged city, did their duty against all odds. In many instances, some left their own storm-damaged homes and families, venturing into flooded, fire-razed, and darkened corners of the city to reach their members and patients.

Recognition for VNSNY’s work included the declaration by Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. as “Visiting Nurse Service of New York” Day.

Recognition for VNSNY’s work included the declaration by Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. as “Visiting Nurse Service of New York” Day.

And this past Thurs., Dec. 20th, the Bronx contingent of VNSNY, which is based near Pelham Bay, was honored for its service, including with a declaration by Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. of “Visiting Nurse Service of New York” Day.

An official proclamation was presented by Melissa Cebollero, the Director of Health and Human Services of the Borough President’s office.

While the Bronx was not as devastated as other boroughs by the storm, several pockets endured severe flooding and power outages.

Michelle Kramer and Maife Santillan, for example, are registered nurses who were working on-site at a senior home in Pelham Gardens, one of the areas that lost electricity after Sandy pummeled her way through the city.

Kramer and Santillan work as a team caring for 200 seniors, many of whom depend on the nurses’ daily visitations for their insulin shots and administration of medications.

Other patients suffer from mental illness, including dementia and Alzheimer’s.

The storm put many in precarious situations, the effects of which were acutely felt by many Bronxites already living with limited resources, including Kramer and Santillan’s elderly patients.

“They are already a vulnerable population,” said Santillan.

Team Michelle Kramer and Maite Santillan worked together to care for 200 seniors: “It was a blessing to be partnered together,” said Kramer (right).

Team Michelle Kramer and Maite Santillan worked together to care for 200 seniors: “It was a blessing to be partnered together,” said Kramer (right).

Kramer and Santillan, along with the aides who spend the night with their patients, never ceased working with the seniors under their care. They maintained their regular visits and ministries despite working in darkened residences, and traversing unlit corridors and stairways with flashlights.

“We felt like coal miners,” chuckled Kramer.

And there were glad to have undertaken the search, recounting the number of times that they found their grateful patients alone in their apartments.

“They were scared,” recalled Santillan. “But for us, it was business as usual, and that gave them comfort.”

Santillan and Kramer took comfort in something as well.

“It was a blessing to be partnered together,” said Kramer, a sentiment with which Santillan was quick to concur.

Fellow honoree Danielle Dixon, a social work care consultant, was appreciative of the spirit of her patients.

Dixon cares for 11 women in Pilot Cove, an independent living center on City Island, where denizens were flooded and without power. The island also lost one of its most beloved restaurants, Tony’s Pier Restaurant, which had burned to the ground.

None of Dixon’s patients are younger than 70; one of them is 96.

All of them refused to evacuate before the storm hit. Some were reluctant to leave because they were afraid of leaving their pets behind, but it was more than concern for their animal friends that kept them at home.

“I’m proud of the members we serve,” said social work care consultant Danielle Dixon.

“I’m proud of the members we serve,” said social work care consultant Danielle Dixon.

“They’re very tenacious,” said Dixon. “These gals came through the Depression. Their character is so strong.”

Dixon said the women hunkered in and supported each other during the storm. They also received support from the community.

“I give a lot of credit to the landlady and the super—whose wife cooked meals for residents,” noted Dixon.

Restaurants also gave out free food.

As Dixon made her rounds, she helped residents connect with the outside world. Dixon’s own house lost electricity, but she was ready for work on Monday after charging her phone at a local laundromat.

Dixon soon realized that she wasn’t just charging her phone for herself, but for her patients as well.

Out of power, she was often the only link between them and their family members, who otherwise had no other way of reaching them.

“Their families were very appreciative,” said Dixon. “It made a world of difference.”

Aside from lacking electricity in her own home, Dixon, who lives in Mount Vernon, spent long hours waiting in line to get gas.

The obstacles seemed to have given her little pause, and she beamed on Thursday as she spoke.

“I’m proud of Visiting Nurses,” she said, “and I’m proud of the members we serve.”

Más allá del servicio

La organización Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY) fue homenajeada por realizar esfuerzos extraordinarios

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

The Visiting Nurse Services of New York’ rehab services coordinator Gilbert López with his supervisor, Rosa Lea Martínez, were among those honored for extraordinary efforts.

Gilbert López, coordinador de servicios de rehabilitación en Visiting Nurse Services of New York (VNSNY), con su supervisora Rosa Lea Martinez, fueron honrados por sus esfuerzos.

Gilbert López tiene una rodilla artrítica.

Pero eso no le impidió caminar desde el Sur del Bronx a Pelham Bay Park.

No fue una competencia atlética en la que López estuvo involucrado.

El lunes de la supertormenta Sandy, esa caminata fue la única forma en la que López, coordinador de servicios de rehabilitación en Visiting Nurse Services of New York (VNSNY), podía ir a trabajar.

“Realmente no esperaba que entrara” dijo su supervisora Rosa Lea Martínez, quien trabajó de forma remota desde su casa durante la tormenta.

Pero Martínez no podía decir que estaba sorprendida.

“Incluso en las tormentas de nieve, está aquí”, observó.

Sin embargo, López recuerda un paseo angustioso ese lunes para ir a trabajar

Los postes de luz se balanceaban peligrosamente con el viento implacable.

Un cielo oscuro que permitía escasa visibilidad no ayudó.

“Era peligroso allá afuera”, dijo López. “Yo no podía ver delante de mí”.

Pero él perseveró en mantener camino, hasta que pudo encontrar un taxi para el último tramo de su viaje.

Y mientras que la historia de determinación de López podría parecerle a algunos como extraordinaria, fue una historia común para muchos miembros del equipo de VNSNY.

Durante la tormenta Sandy, más de 5,000 asistentes de salud a domicilio, enfermeras, trabajadores sociales y personal de VNSNY, se dispersaron a través de todas las áreas de la ciudad devastada por la tormenta y cumplieron con su deber en contra de todas las probabilidades. En muchos casos, algunos salieron de sus propias casas dañadas por la tormenta dejando a sus familias, aventurándose en las inundaciones, los incendios y las esquinas oscuras de la ciudad para llegar con sus pacientes.

Recognition for VNSNY’s work included the declaration by Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. as “Visiting Nurse Service of New York” Day.

El reconocimiento otorgado incluyo una declaración del Presidente del Condado del Bronx Ruben Diaz Jr. como día “Visiting Nurse Service of New York”.

Y el pasado jueves 20 de diciembre el contingente de VNSNY del Bronx, que tiene su sede cerca de Pelham Bay, fue homenajeado por su servicio, y el día fue declarado oficialmente por el presidente del distrito del Bronx, Rubén Díaz Jr., como el día “Visiting Nurse Services of New York “.

Mientras que el condado del Bronx en su conjunto no fue devastado como otros distritos, muchos sufrieron inundaciones y apagones de electricidad.

Michelle Kramer y Maife Santillán, por ejemplo, son enfermeras que trabajaban en un asilo de ancianos en Pelham Gardens, una de las zonas que quedaron sin electricidad después de que la tormenta Sandy azotó a la ciudad.

Kramer y Santillán trabajan como un equipo de cuidado para 200 ancianos, muchos de los cuales dependen de las visitas diarias del personal de enfermería “para sus inyecciones de insulina y la administración de los medicamentos”. Otros pacientes sufren de enfermedades mentales, incluida la demencia y el Alzheimer.

La tormenta puso a muchos en situaciones precarias, cuyos efectos se hicieron sentir agudamente por la gente del Bronx, muchos ya viven con recursos limitados, incluyendo a los pacientes de edad avanzada de Kramer y Santillán.

“Ellos ya eran una población vulnerable”, dijo Santillán.

Team Michelle Kramer and Maite Santillan worked together to care for 200 seniors: “It was a blessing to be partnered together,” said Kramer (right).

Michelle Kramer y Maite Santillan formaron un equipo que asistió a más de 200 envejecientes: “”Fue una bendición que nos tocara estar juntas”, dijo Kramer (derecha).

Kramer y Santillán, junto con los ayudantes que pasan la noche con sus pacientes, nunca dejaron de trabajar con las personas mayores a su cargo. Mantuvieron sus visitas regulares a pesar de trabajar en residencias oscuras, sin luz y atravesar pasillos y escaleras con linternas.

“Nos sentimos como mineras de carbón”, rió Kramer.

Ellas se alegraron, dado el número de veces que encontraron a sus pacientes agradecidos y solos en sus departamentos.

“Tenían miedo”, recordó Santillán. “Pero para nosotros era hacer lo de siempre, y eso les dio consuelo”.

Santillán y Kramer encontraron consuelo en algo también.

“Fue una bendición que nos tocara estar juntas”, dijo Kramer, un sentimiento con el que Santillán se apresuró a coincidir.

Danielle Dixon, compañera homenajeada y consultora de trabajo social, apreció el espíritu de sus pacientes.

Dixon se preocupa por 11 mujeres en Pilot Cove, un centro de vida independiente en City Island, donde las residencias estaban inundadas y sin energía. La isla también perdió a uno de sus restaurantes más queridos, el Tony Pier, que se quemó hasta los cimientos.

Ninguno de los pacientes de Dixon son menores de 70 años, uno de ellos tiene 96.

Todos ellos se negaron a evacuar antes de que la tormenta golpeara. Algunos se resistían a salir porque tenían miedo de dejar a sus mascotas.

“Son muy tenaces”, dijo Dixon. “Estas chicas sobrevivieron la Depresión. Su carácter es tan fuerte”.

“I’m proud of the members we serve,” said social work care consultant Danielle Dixon.

“I’m proud of the members we serve,” said social work care consultant Danielle Dixon.

Dixon dijo que las mujeres se pusieron en cuclillas y se apoyaron mutuamente durante la tormenta. También recibieron el apoyo de la comunidad.

“Le doy mucho crédito a la casera, quien preparó comida para las residentes”.

Los restaurantes también repartieron comida gratis.

Dixon continuó haciendo sus rondas y ayudó a los residentes a conectarse con el mundo exterior. En la casa de Dixon se quedaron sin electricidad, pero estaba lista para trabajar el lunes después de cargar su teléfono en una lavandería local.

Dixon pronto se dio cuenta de que no estaba cargando su teléfono para ella misma, sino por sus pacientes también.

Sin electricidad, Dixon era a menudo el único vínculo entre ellas y sus familiares, que de otro modo no tenían forma de contactarlos.

“Sus familias estaban muy agradecidas”, dijo Dixon. “Hizo un mundo de diferencia”.

Aparte de carecer de electricidad en su propia casa, Dixon, que vive en Mount Vernon, pasaba largas horas esperando en la línea para conseguir gasolina.
Los obstáculos no parecían darle un respiro.

“Estoy orgullosa de Visiting Nurses”, dijo Dixon, “y estoy orgullosa de los miembros que brindamos el servicio”.