Flaw in the fun
Daño en la diversión

  • English
  • Español

Flaw in the fun

Advocates seek to ban”toxic toys”

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

"It's like playing Russian roulette,” says Bobbi Chase-Wilding, of Clean and Healthy New York.

“It’s like playing Russian roulette,” says Bobbi Chase-Wilding, of Clean and Healthy New York.

Zachary Miller thought he was being a good dad.

When shopping with his seven-year-old daughter, Zahirah, a Dora the Explorer backpack caught the child’s eye.

“She begged me for the backpack, so I bought it for her,” said Miller. “She liked it so much that she was kissing it all the time.”

Miller was shocked to later learn that the backpack he purchased contained traces of a toxic chemical.

Fortunately for Miller, his daughter was not sickened, but environmental activists claim that store shelves in New York City are full of children’s products that contain harmful toxins.

Products featuring the popular character were found to contain traces of a toxic chemical.

Products featuring the popular character were found to contain traces of a toxic chemical.

A report issued in December by advocacy groups Clean and Healthy New York, Center for Environmental Health and WE ACT for Environmental Justice (WE ACT) revealed that traces of toxic chemicals were found in children’s toys, clothing, shoes, jewelry, lunch boxes and accessories sold at various retailers throughout the five boroughs.

Parents are typically unaware of what chemicals might exist in the products they purchase for their children, said Bobbi Chase Wilding, Deputy Director for Clean and Healthy New York.

“A parent is completely flying blind,” she remarked. “It’s like playing Russian roulette.”
“[We] have no idea that these dangerous products are out there,” added Miller.

On January 14, advocates gathered on the steps of City Hall to show support for Intro 803-A, legislation that could potentially ban the use of certain chemicals in children’s products.

Currently, no law exists in New York that requires manufacturers to disclose the use of or eliminate many toxic chemicals used in the manufacture of kid’s merchandise.

Councilmember Mark Levine, who is supporting the bill, said that consumers are vulnerable due to the current lack of regulations.

The ongoing campaign has sought to focus attention on children’s toys.

The ongoing campaign has sought to focus attention on children’s toys.

“What’s terrifying to me about these toys is that they look normal,” he remarked. “I could see myself buying one of these.”

Chase Wilding explained that Clean and Healthy New York tested kid’s products purchased at a range of discount stores, big-box retailers and 99-cent shops, including Target, Toys “R” Us, Macy’s, Jack’s and Shopper’s World.

Tests results showed traces of arsenic, lead, cadmium and other chemicals in many of the toys.

“With no law on the books, thousands of families across the city have unknowingly purchased an item on this list,” said Cecil Corbin-Mark, Deputy Director of WE ACT.

“Many of our members are parents who reside in Northern Manhattan and the Bronx, where the job of taking care of a child is already hard enough — they shouldn’t have to be mom, dad and toxicologist,” he stated.

"I could see myself buying one of these,” said Councilmember Mark Levine.

“I could see myself buying one of these,” said Councilmember Mark Levine.

Chase Wilding said the kids are even more vulnerable to toxic-laden products than adults, as children frequently put items in their mouth and can be sickened by smaller traces of toxins than grown-ups.

“Many people assume that because a product is for kids, it must be safe,” said Chase Wilding.
David Levine, Chief Executive Officer of the American Sustainable Business Council (ASBC), said it should be achievable for manufacturers to eliminate harmful chemicals from kid’s items, as products can be made without them.

“If we can take the lead out of gasoline, or the BPA out of baby bottles, then we could eliminate toxins in toys,” he said.

In addition to calling for stricter regulations on manufacturers, advocates are also urging New York retailers to refuse to sell products containing toxic chemicals.

ASBC’s Levine said there is a lack of oversight in the manufacturing industry for ensuring that companies exclude chemicals from kid’s products.

“If we’re leaving it up to the manufacturers to do the right thing, then we’ve failed,” he remarked.

"Thousands of families have unknowingly purchased an item on this list," said WE ACT’s Cecil Corbin-Mark.

“Thousands of families have unknowingly purchased an item on this list,” said WE ACT’s Cecil Corbin-Mark.

The report, released in December 2015, included data on 12 children’s toys and products purchased from Jack’s World, Macy’s, Regine’s, Shopper’s World, Target, Toys”R”Us and several 99-cents stores in boroughs across New York City in June and September 2015.

Researchers detected:

  • Arsenic in two products: shoes and a lunch box,
  • Antimony in five products: clothing, a necklace, an accessory, a purse and a doll,
  • Cadmium in two products: a pencil holder school supply and an accessory,
  • Cobalt in six products: jewelry and accessories,
  • Lead in four products: jewelry, accessories, and footwear.

Decades of scientific research shows toxic chemicals are linked to health problems including cancer, hormone disruption and harm to the developing brain. Children are uniquely vulnerable because they eat, drink and breathe more, pound for pound, than adults, put their hands and objects in their mouths more often, and are undergoing developmental stages that are sensitive to disruption from environmental chemicals.

The products were tested using an X-Ray Fluorescence Analyzer (“XRF Analyzer”), a device that can detect levels of chemicals on the surface of almost any object. The XRF is an accurate device used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to screen packaging, the U.S. Food

The group has sought to raise awareness across the state.

The group has sought to raise awareness across the state.

and Drug Administration to screen food, and many state and county health departments to screen for residential lead paint.

In April, the Consumer Product Safety Commission determined that the High Definition (HD) XRF from XOS, X-Ray Optical Systems, used to test these items was comparable to lab testing for the chemicals covered in the report.

All products in the report were bought from stores in New York City. Only a small fraction of the children’s products for sale in New York City were tested, and authors note it was not intended to be a comprehensive report on the safety of any product or brand.

 

 

Daño en la diversión

Defensores buscan prohibir “juguetes tóxicos”

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

David Levine es el director ejecutivo del Consejo Empresarial Sostenible de América (ASBC por sus siglas en inglés).

David Levine es el director ejecutivo del Consejo Empresarial Sostenible de América (ASBC por sus siglas en inglés).

Zachary Miller pensó que estaba siendo un buen padre.

Al hacer compras en Queens con su hija de siete años de edad, Zahirah, una mochila de Dora la Exploradora llamó la atención de la niña.

“Ella me suplicó por la mochila, así que se la compré”, dijo Miller. “A ella le gustó tanto que la besaba todo el tiempo”.

Miller se sorprendió al descubrir después que la mochila que compró contenía rastros de una sustancia química tóxica.

Afortunadamente para Miller, su hija no se enfermó, pero los activistas ambientales afirman que las tiendas en la ciudad de Nueva York están llenas de productos para niños que contienen toxinas dañinas.

Un informe publicado en diciembre por los grupos de defensa Clean and Healthy New York, Centro para la Salud Ambiental y WE ACT por la Justicia Ambiental (WE ACT) reveló que rastros de químicos tóxicos fueron encontrados en juguetes, ropa, zapatos, joyas, cajas de almuerzo y accesorios para niños, vendidos en varias tiendas en los cinco condados.

Los padres suelen estar conscientes de que podrían existir sustancias químicas en los productos que compran para sus hijos, dijo Bobbi Chase Wilding, Director Adjunto de Clean and Healthy Nueva York.

“Los padres están a ciegas”, remarcó. “Es como jugar a la ruleta rusa”.

“No tenemos ni idea de que estos productos peligrosos están ahí fuera”, agregó Miller.

The group has sought to raise awareness across the state.

El grupo se ha proyectado por todo el estado.

El 14 de enero los defensores se reunieron en las escalinatas del Ayuntamiento para mostrar su apoyo a Intro 803-A, la legislación que podría prohibir el uso de ciertas sustancias químicas en los productos para niños. Actualmente no existe ninguna ley en Nueva York que exija a los fabricantes revelar el uso o eliminar muchos productos químicos tóxicos utilizados en la fabricación de mercancía para niños.

El concejal Mark Levine, quien apoya el proyecto de ley, dijo que los consumidores son vulnerables debido a la actual falta de regulaciones.

“Lo que me aterroriza sobre estos juguetes es que se ven normales”, comentó. “Podría verme comprando uno de estos”.

Chase Wilding explicó que Clean and Healthy Nueva York probó productos para niños comprados en una amplia gama de tiendas de descuento, grandes minoristas y tiendas de 99 centavos, incluyendo Target, Toys “R” Us, Macy’s, Jack’s y Shopper’s World.

Los resultados de las pruebas mostraron rastros de arsénico, plomo, cadmio y otras sustancias químicas en muchos de los juguetes.

“Sin ley en los libros, miles de familias en toda la ciudad han comprado inconscientemente un elemento en esta lista”, dijo Cecil Corbin-Mark, director adjunto de WE ACT.

"Thousands of families have unknowingly purchased an item on this list," said WE ACT’s Cecil Corbin-Mark.

“Miles de familias en toda la ciudad han comprado inconscientemente un elemento en esta lista”, dijo Cecil Corbin-Mark, de WE ACT.

“Muchos de nuestros miembros son padres que residen en el norte de Manhattan y el Bronx, donde el trabajo de cuidar de un niño ya es bastante difícil. No deberían tener que ser mamá, papá y toxicólogo”, afirmó.

Chase Wilding dijo que los niños son aún más vulnerables a los productos tóxicos cargados que los adultos, ya que los niños con frecuencia ponen artículos en su boca y se pueden enfermar por rastros de toxinas más pequeños que los adultos.

“Mucha gente asume que porque un producto es para niños, debe ser seguro”, dijo Chase Wilding.

David Levine, director ejecutivo del Consejo Empresarial Sostenible de América (ASBC por sus siglas en inglés), dijo que debería ser alcanzable para los fabricantes el eliminar los productos químicos nocivos de artículos para niños, ya que los productos se pueden hacer sin ellos.

“Si somos capaces de tomar la iniciativa de sacar la gasolina o el BPA de los biberones, entonces podríamos eliminar las toxinas en los juguetes”, dijo.

Además de pedir regulaciones más estrictas a los fabricantes, los defensores también están instando a los minoristas de Nueva York a negarse a vender los productos que contienen sustancias químicas tóxicas.

Levine, de ASBC, dijo que hay una falta de supervisión en la industria de la fabricación para garantizar que las empresas no incluyan químicos en los productos para niños.

“Si dejamos a los fabricantes hacer lo correcto, entonces hemos fallado”, comentó.

 

"I could see myself buying one of these,” said Councilmember Mark Levine.

“Podría verme comprando uno de estos”, dijo el concejal Mark Levine.

El informe, publicado en diciembre de 2015, incluyó datos sobre los juguetes y productos de 12 niños comprados en Jack’s World, Macy’s, Regine, Shopper’s World, Target, Toys “R” Us y varias tiendas de 99 centavos en condados toda la Ciudad de Nueva York en junio y septiembre 2.015.

Los investigadores detectaron:

  • Arsénico en dos productos: zapatos y una caja de almuerzo,
  • Antimonio en cinco productos: ropa, un collar, un accesorio, un bolso y una muñeca,
  • Cadmio en dos productos: un portalápices y un accesorio,
  • Cobalto en seis productos: joyas y accesorios,
  • Plomo en cuatro productos: joyas, accesorios y calzado.
The ongoing campaign has sought to focus attention on children’s toys.

La campaña ha tratado de centrar la atención en los juguetes de los niños.

Décadas de investigación científica muestran que los productos químicos tóxicos están relacionados con problemas de salud como el cáncer, trastornos hormonales y daño al cerebro en desarrollo. Los niños son especialmente vulnerables porque comen, beben y respiran más, libra por libra, que los adultos, ponen sus manos y objetos en sus bocas con más frecuencia, y están sometidos a las etapas de desarrollo que son sensibles a la alteración de los productos químicos ambientales.

Los productos fueron probados usando un X-Ray Fluorescence Analyzer (“XRF Analyzer”), un dispositivo que puede detectar niveles de sustancias químicas en la superficie de casi cualquier objeto. El XRF es un dispositivo de precisión utilizado por la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de Estados Unidos para defender el embalaje, la Food and Drug Administration de

Products featuring the popular character were found to contain traces of a toxic chemical.

Productos con la figura popular se notaron contener trazas de una sustancia química tóxica.

Estados Unidos para empaquetar la comida, y muchos departamentos estatales y de salud del condado buscan detectar la pintura residencial. En abril, la Comisión de Seguridad de Productos del Consumidor determinó que la fluorescencia de rayos X de alta definición (HD) de XOS, X-Ray Optical Systems, utilizado para probar estos artículos era comparable a las pruebas de laboratorio para los productos químicos incluidos en el informe.

Todos los productos en el informe fueron comprados en tiendas en la ciudad de Nueva York. Sólo una pequeña fracción de los productos de los niños para la venta en la ciudad de Nueva York fue puesta a prueba, y los autores en cuenta que no estaba destinado a ser un informe exhaustivo sobre la seguridad de cualquier producto o marca.