EducationLocalNewsPolitics/government

Easy as UPK
Fácil como UPK

Easy as UPK

Labor lines up for Mayor’s Pre-K Plan

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


Our job is to reach every child here and now,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio in advocating for universal pre-k and after school program funding.
Our job is to reach every child here and now,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio in advocating for universal pre-k and after school program funding.

In one of his first press conferences, Mayor Bill de Blasio and a group of eleven unions active throughout the city and state led the charge for one of his ambitious campaign goals: a tax hike on the wealthy to help subsidize universal pre-kindergarten and after school programs for middle schoolers.

“Today is a very rare event that you have all these unions together,” said Hector Figueroa, President of 32BJ SEIU this past Mon., Jan. 6th.

That the unions had coalesced around the issue manifests its importance, he said.

Figueroa spoke from first-hand experience.

He has two children, one who has a coveted seat in a city-run full-day pre-kindergarten program.

The program needs to be expanded, he said.

“I think a lot of our members will take advantage of this. This is a way to organize our lives better.”

Representatives of eleven unions pledged support for the plan.
Representatives of eleven unions pledged support for the plan.

It was a deliberate show of unity.

Altogether, the unions at the press conference represent 1.5 million members, and have endorsed hundreds of elected officials.

“Nobody disputes the evidence of the benefits of universal pre-k and after school programs,” said Vincent Álvarez, President of the New York City Labor Council.

The leaders have banded together as part of a coalition to put pressure on leaders in Albany to allow New York City to tax residents in order to fund the programs, and used the press conference on Monday to announce their united front.

“Our labor movement will spend the next few months talking to leaders,” promised Alvarez.

“[It is] a very rare event that you have all these unions together,” Héctor Figueroa, President of 32BJ.
“[It is] a very rare event that you have all these unions together,” Héctor Figueroa, President of 32BJ.
A centerpiece of the mayor’s campaign last year, universal full-day pre-kindergarten and after school programs for all middle schoolers in his plan would be funded by a tax on wealthy New Yorkers earning more than $500,000 a year. The five-year tax would average $973 a year—which, the Mayor pointed out in his inaugural address, is approximately the price of one’s daily soy latte at Starbucks.

Those on Monday argued that the union members and their families would benefit greatly from the expansion of these programs.

“The children of countless low-wage and middle-class workers will benefit tremendously from this progressive and pragmatic proposal,” said Stuart Appelbaum, President of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU), UFCW.

George Miranda, International Vice President and President of the Teamsters Joint Council 16, noted that pre-K and after-school programs “provide critical economic security to New York City’s working families.”

And there appears to be widespread support from city residents.

A recent New York Times/Siena poll of New York City residents found that 72% are supportive of the Mayor’s plan.

We need to get this done,” said Michael Mulgrew, President of the New York chapter of the United Federation of Teachers.
We need to get this done,” said Michael Mulgrew, President of the New York chapter of the United Federation of Teachers.

It would seem like the mayor, the Governor Andrew Cuomo, and President Barack Obama, are all in the same boat, at least ideologically.

The President has already expressed interest in making pre-k available to every child in the United States, and the Governor seems to have concurred.

“There’s no doubt that pre-k is the way to go, and that it should be accelerated, and I think we’re going to have unanimity on that,” said Governor Cuomo in a press conference held at the exactly same time as the Mayor’s.

But he has also supported cutting taxes throughout the state, and has not yet explained how his universal pre-k policy would be funded.

But Mayor de Blasio insisted on Monday that he and the Governor were not as diametrically opposed on how to fund Pre-K as some have insisted.

“He has a vision for state taxes and I respect that vision. We’re talking about the ability of the people of New York City to tax themselves. This is about city taxes, not state taxes,” he said.

If the governor does come up with funds in the state for universal pre-k, Mayor de Blasio suggested that funds could be used elsewhere while a tax on the wealthy would still be implemented. Additionally, Governor Cuomo did not mention anything about after-school programs for middle schoolers, and there are worries that in the governor’s plan, funding might not be continuous.

George Miranda, International Vice President and President of the Teamsters Joint Council 16, said the programs “provide critical economic security to New York City’s working families.”
George Miranda, International Vice President and President of the Teamsters Joint Council 16, said the programs “provide critical economic security to New York City’s working families.”

“It’s critical that this money be a dedicated source. It’s the only way to ensure that it won’t lose funding,” argued the Mayor. “Our job is to reach every child here and now. We don’t want a phase-in, we don’t want a someday.”

Many of the union leaders present attested to the importance of these programs.

Peter Ward, President of the New York Hotel and Motel Trades Council, recalled his days at an after-school program in the community center in the Nostrand Houses in Brooklyn, where he grew up.

“It was a great place where we could go, in a supervised environment, and do all sorts of great things, and stay off the street,” he said.

“We know one single fact that no one can dispute: that children in pre-k do better who are not,” said Michael Mulgrew, President of the New York chapter of the United Federation of Teachers. “It’s not just about a talking point. We need to get this done.”

There seemed little doubt, among those gathered, that it will get done.

“We don’t think it’ll be easy,” noted Mayor de Blasio. “But we think we’ll be victorious.”

For more information on the coalition, please visit http://upknyc.org.

Fácil como UPK

Trabajadores apoyan el plan de pre-jardín de infancia del Alcalde

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


En una de sus primeras conferencias de prensa, el alcalde Bill de Blasio y un grupo de once sindicatos activos en toda la ciudad y el estado, dirigieron la carga a uno de los ambiciosos objetivos de su campaña: un aumento en los impuestos a los ricos para ayudar a subsidiar el pre-jardín de infantes universal y programas para después de la escuela para estudiantes de escuela intermedia.

Representatives of eleven unions pledged support for the plan.
Los representantes de once sindicatos se comprometieron a apoyar el plan.

“Es un evento muy raro el que reúne a estos sindicatos”, dijo Héctor Figueroa, presidente de la 32BJ SEIU, el pasado lunes 6 de enero.

Que los sindicatos se hubieran unido en torno al asunto manifiesta su importancia, dijo.

Figueroa habló sobre la experiencia vivida.

Él tiene dos hijos, uno que tiene un codiciado asiento en un programa de pre-jardín de infantes de día completo dirigido por la ciudad.

El programa debe ser ampliado, dijo.

“Creo que muchos de nuestros miembros lo aprovecharían. Esta es una manera de organizar mejor nuestras vidas”.

“[It is] a very rare event that you have all these unions together,” Héctor Figueroa, President of 32BJ.
“[Es] un evento muy raro que reúne a estos sindicatos”, Héctor Figueroa, presidente de la 32BJ.
Fue un espectáculo deliberado de unidad.

En total, los sindicatos en la conferencia de prensa representaban 1.5 millones de miembros, y han apoyado a cientos de funcionarios electos.

“Nadie discute la evidencia de los beneficios de los programas de pre-jardín de infancia universal y para después de la escuela”, dijo Vicente Álvarez, Presidente del Consejo de Trabajo de Nueva York.

Los líderes se unieron como parte de una coalición para presionar a los líderes en Albany a que permitieran que la ciudad de Nueva York grave a los residentes con el fin de financiar los programas, y utilizaron la rueda de prensa del lunes para anunciar su frente unido.

“Nuestro movimiento obrero pasará los próximos meses hablando con los líderes”, prometió Álvarez.

Una pieza central de la campaña del Alcalde el año pasado, el pre-jardín de infantes universal de día completo y programas para después de clases para todos los estudiantes de escuela intermedia, sería financiada por un impuesto a los neoyorquinos acaudalados que ganan más de $500,000 dólares al año. El impuesto de cinco años tendría un promedio de $973 dólares anuales, lo cual, el Alcalde ha destacado en su discurso de toma de posesión, es aproximadamente el precio de un café con leche de soya diario en Starbucks.

"Nadie discute la evidencia de los beneficios del pre-jardín de infancia universal y los programas para después de clases", dijo Vicente Álvarez, presidente del Consejo Laboral de la ciudad de Nueva York.
“Nadie discute la evidencia de los beneficios del pre-jardín de infancia universal y los programas para después de clases”, dijo Vicente Álvarez, presidente del Consejo Laboral de la ciudad de Nueva York.

Los reunidos el lunes sostuvieron que los miembros del sindicato y sus familias se beneficiarían mucho de la expansión de estos programas.

“Los hijos de un sinnúmero de trabajadores de bajos ingresos y de clase media se beneficiarán enormemente de esta propuesta progresista y pragmática”, dijo Stuart Appelbaum, presidente de Union, tienda minorista, mayorista y departamental (RWDSU), UFCW.

George Miranda, vice presidente internacional y presidente del consejo conjunto Teamsters 16, señaló que el pre-jardín de infantes y los programas para después de la escuela “proporcionan seguridad económica fundamental para las familias trabajadoras de la ciudad de Nueva York”.

Y parece que hay un amplio apoyo de los residentes la ciudad.

Una reciente encuesta del New York Times / Siena entre los residentes de la ciudad de Nueva York, encontró que el 72% apoya el plan del Alcalde.

Al parecer, al igual que el Alcalde, el gobernador Andrew Cuomo y el presidente Barack Obama, están todos en el mismo barco, al menos ideológicamente.

El Presidente ya ha expresado su interés en lograr que el pre-jardín de infantes esté disponible para todos los niños en los Estados Unidos, y el gobernador parece haber coincidido.

Our job is to reach every child here and now,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio in advocating for universal pre-k and after school program funding.
“Nuestro trabajo es llegar a todos los niños aquí y ahora”, dijo el alcalde Bill de Blasio, defendiendo el financiamiento del pre-jardín de infancia universal y el programa para después de la escuela.

“No hay duda de que la implementación de pre-jardín de infantes es el camino a seguir, y que debe ser acelerado, creo que vamos a tener unanimidad sobre eso”, dijo el gobernador Cuomo en una conferencia de prensa celebrada exactamente al mismo tiempo que la del Alcalde.

Pero también ha apoyado la reducción de impuestos en todo el estado, y todavía no ha explicado cómo sería financiada su política de pre-jardín de infancia universal.

Pero el alcalde de Blasio insistió el lunes que él y el Gobernador no tienen posturas diametralmente opuestos sobre cómo financiar el pre-jardín de infancia como algunos han insistido.

“Él tiene una visión de los impuestos estatales y yo la respeto. Estamos hablando de la habilidad de la gente de la ciudad de Nueva York para gravarse a sí mismos. Esto se trata de los impuestos de la ciudad, no de impuestos estatales”, dijo.

Si el Gobernador logra conseguir los fondos del estado para el pre-jardín de infancia universal, el alcalde de Blasio sugiere que los fondos se utilicen en otros lugares, mientras que el impuesto a los ricos aún se aplique. Además, el gobernador Cuomo no mencionó nada acerca de los programas para después de clases para los estudiantes de escuela intermedia, y hay temores de que en el plan del gobernador, el financiamiento pueda no ser permanente.

We need to get this done,” said Michael Mulgrew, President of the New York chapter of the United Federation of Teachers.
“Tenemos que hacer esto”, dijo Michael Mulgrew, presidente del capítulo de la Federación Unida de Maestros de Nueva York.

“Es muy importante que este dinero sea una fuente destinada. Es la única manera de asegurarse de que no se van a perder los fondos”, argumentó el Alcalde. “Nuestro trabajo es llegar a todos los niños aquí y ahora.

No queremos una fase transitoria, no queremos promesas de que ocurrirá en el futuro”.

Muchos de los dirigentes sindicales presentes confirmaron la importancia de estos programas.

Peter Ward, presidente del Consejo de Comercio de hoteles y moteles de Nueva York, recordó sus días en un programa para después de la escuela en el centro comunitario en las Casas Nostrand en Brooklyn, donde se crió.

“Fue un gran lugar al que podíamos ir, en un ambiente supervisado, y hacer todo tipo de cosas geniales, y alejarnos de la calle”, dijo.

“Sabemos un solo hecho que nadie puede poner en duda: a los niños en pre-jardín de infantes les va mejor que a los que no asisten”, dijo Michael Mulgrew, presidente del capítulo de la Federación Unida de Maestros de Nueva York. “No se trata sólo de un tema de conversación. Tenemos que hacer esto”.

Parecía que había pocas dudas entre los reunidos, de que se logrará.

“No creemos que será fácil”, señaló el alcalde de Blasio. “Pero creemos que saldremos victoriosos”.

Para más información sobre la coalición, por favor visite http://upknyc.org.

Related Articles

Check Also
Close
Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker