Childcare program raises concerns

Surgen preocupaciones en programa de cuidado infantil

Surgen preocupaciones en programa de cuidado infantil

  • English
  • Español

Childcare program raises concerns

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“Childcare is a pivotal point that allows parents to continue to work and provide for their families,” said Councilmember Annabel Palma (center), Chair of the Committee on General Welfare.

“Childcare is a pivotal point that allows parents to continue to work and provide for their families,” said Councilmember Annabel Palma (center), Chair of the Committee on General Welfare.

Just after the ravages of Hurricane Sandy tore into the city last year, a new light of opportunity for early childhood learning seemed to shine bright.

So said Stephanie Gendell, the Associate Executive Director for Policy and Government Relations at Citizens’ Committee for Children, this past Mon., Oct. 28th.

City Councilmember Annabel Palma, who is Chair of the City Council Committee on General Welfare, Councilmember Andy King, fellow elected officials, ACS and child care providers converged at City Hall on Monday to weigh in on the program EarlyLearn NYC a year after its implementation.

“We’re very supportive of the vision of EarlyLearn,” said Gendell. “Early education is important. It’s been proven that it levels the playing field for low income children, but the problem is that it’s been underfunded.”

At a rally held just before a stated City Council committee hearing, Gendell spoke on EarlyLearn NYC, which combines subsidized childcare, Head Start and Universal Pre-Kindergarten into a single system that serves children from the age of six weeks to 4 years old. The programs use a curriculum, and are overseen by the Administration for Children’s Services (ACS).

“The need for quality early childhood education is clear,” said Councilmember Andy King.

“The need for quality early childhood education is clear,” said Councilmember Andy King.

The new model aims to deliver a higher level of service by, for example, improving teacher to child ratios, establishing developmentally-appropriate, research-validated curricula, and enhancing professional staff development.

At the time of its implementation, former ACS Commissioner Jon Mattingly explained that there would an assessment protocol for evaluating programs, and he dubbed it “the nation’s first performance measurement standards and tools for all early childhood development and education programs.”

But a year later, concerns have been raised, with many charging that the program has been poorly implemented, under-enrolled and inadequately funded.

EarlyLearn was set up to serve 42,000 children, but as of September 1, 2013, only 29,734 children were enrolled. Although ACS has made a concerted effort over the past year to increase enrollment, numbers are clearly flagging.

The low enrollment numbers provide a stark contrast to the average childcare voucher enrollment of 71,756, which includes families that are using vouchers that are mandated by state law. Under New York State law, vouchers must be provided to families on public assistance and with children under 13, and for an additional twelve consecutive months after the family’s public assistance ends. Parents have the choice to use the vouchers for contracted child care center, family child care providers, or informal providers, who may be friends, neighbors, or relatives.

This informal use of vouchers, explained advocates on Monday, defeats the purpose of funding EarlyLearn NYC for educational childcare.

“The last program was a hundred percent better than Early Learn,” said Raglan George Jr., DC 1707’s Executive Director.

“The last program was a hundred percent better than Early Learn,” said Raglan George Jr., DC 1707’s Executive Director.

As a result of the high voucher enrollment and low EarlyLearn enrollment, ACS has shifted EarlyLearn funding to cover the cost of vouchers.

Moreover, low enrollment numbers affect providers, who are no longer paid based on their capacity, but instead paid a daily rate based on enrollment or attendance. The shift in funding and pay for enrollment raise concerns at the Council and among advocates that EarlyLearn capacity will not be maintained for the long term.

Additionally, 13,000 members of the child care workers union, DC 1707, lost their jobs when their day care centers were closed as a result of the merge.

The estimate was provided by Raglan George Jr., the Executive Director of the union, who noted that approximately 70 centers were closed.

“They RFP’ed out a lot of programs that were in operation for 30 years.”

At the time of the hearing, ACS did not have information on the number of jobs and centers that have been replaced, but noted that there were 365 centers in total.

Furthermore, rather than the city paying for workers’ benefits, the centers are now directly responsible for paying benefits, decreasing the likelihood that their workers will be insured.

Stephanie Gendell, the Associate Executive Director for Policy and Government Relations at Citizens’ Committee for Children.

Stephanie Gendell, the Associate Executive Director for Policy and Government Relations at Citizens’ Committee for Children.

George Jr. was angry because the union was given little say in the program.

“There was no testing of it, the city just implemented it,” he charged. “The last program was a hundred percent better than Early Learn.”

Ronald Richter, the Commissioner of ACS, in his testimony during the hearing, purported that Early Learn NYC “provides high quality programming with the help of qualified teachers and best practices that have proven results.”

Members of the Committee criticized ACS for not implementing any performance measurements.

Commissioner Richter, however, argued that “it was a little early to begin measuring outcomes.”

In the meantime, ACS will continue to have its performance measured by child care workers and elected officials.

Insufficient capacity in the EarlyLearn system was a motivating factor in the development of the City Council-funded discretionary childcare system.

“What we were always screaming for and advocating for was that no one would lose any slots. Childcare is a pivotal point that allows parents to continue to work and provide for their families,” said Councilmember Anabel Palma.

“As a single mom, I know all the struggles of going back and forth.”

In order to mitigate the loss in subsidized childcare capacity brought on by the transition to EarlyLearn, the Council now funds childcare programs that serve nearly 4,500 children citywide, and is partnering with the Early Childhood Professional Development Institute at City University of New York to ensure that high-quality services are being delivered at the discretionary sites.

For those gathered on Monday, the most pressing concern was mobilizing additional resources.

“The need for quality early childhood education is clear, as studies prove that youngsters who receive early learning experiences do well in school because they are well prepared,” said Councilmember King. “It is imperative that we continue to invest in and strengthen our EarlyLearn program.”

Surgen preocupaciones en programa de cuidado infantil

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“Childcare is a pivotal point that allows parents to continue to work and provide for their families,” said Councilmember Annabel Palma (center), Chair of the Committee on General Welfare.

“El cuidado infantil en un punto clave que le permite a los padres continuar trabajando y proveyendo para sus familias”, dijo la Concejal Anabel Palma, quien dirige el Comité del Concejo de la Ciudad de Ayuda de Bienestar General.

Justo después de los estragos que el huracán Sandy llevó a la ciudad, una nueva luz de oportunidad para el aprendizaje en la infancia parece brillar.

Eso dijo Stephanie Gendell, directora ejecutiva asociada del Comité de Ciudadanos para Niños de Relaciones de Política y Gobierno, acerca de Aprendizaje Temprano NYC este pasado lunes, 28 de octubre.

La Concejal Annabel Palma, quien dirige el Comité del Concejo de la Ciudad de Ayuda de Bienestar General, el concejal Andy King, compañeros oficiales, ACS y proveedores de cuidado infantil convergieron en la alcaldía el lunes para intervenir en el programa un año después de su implementación.

“Somos seguidores de la visión de Aprendizaje Temprano”, dijo Gendell. “La educación temprana es importante. Está probado que nivela el campo de juego para los niños de bajos ingresos, pero el problema es que no está siendo bien financiado”.

En una manifestación justo antes de la vista del comité, Gendell habló del Aprendizaje Temprano NYC, el cual combina cuidado infantil financiado, Head Start y Pre-Jardín Infantil Universal en un sencillo sistema que sirve a niños desde seis semanas hasta 4 años de edad. Los programas utilizan un plan de estudio, y es supervisado por la Administración de Servicios a Niños (ACS, por sus siglas en inglés). El nuevo modelo pretende ofrecer un nivel mayor de servicio, por ejemplo, estableciendo un apropiado desarrollo, un plan de estudios validado y mejorar el desarrollo profesional de los empleados.

“La necesidad de calidad en la educación infantil es clara”, dijo el Concejal Andy King.

“La necesidad de calidad en la educación infantil es clara”, dijo el Concejal Andy King.

En el momento de implementación, el antiguo comisionado de ACS, Jon Mattingly explicó que habría un protocolo de evaluación para evaluar los programas, y apodó “primeros estándares de medición de desempeño y herramientas para los programas de desarrollo temprano y educación de la nación”.

Pero un año después, han surgido preocupaciones, con muchos alegando que el programa ha sido pobremente implementado, bajo en inscripciones y financiado inadecuadamente.

Aprendizaje Temprano se creo para servir a 42,000 niños, pero hasta el 1 de septiembre de 2013, solo 29,734 niños estaban inscritos. Aunque ACS ha hecho un gran esfuerzo durante el pasado año para aumentar la inscripción, los números claramente están decayendo.

Los bajos números de inscripción proporcionan un contraste con el promedio de inscripción de vales para cuidado infantil de 71,756, lo cual incluye familias que están utilizando vales que son mandados por la ley estatal. Bajo la ley del estado de Nueva York, los vales deben de ser suministrados a familias con asistencia pública y con niños menores de 13 años, y durante un tiempo de doce meses consecutivos luego de que termine la asistencia pública de la familia. Los padres tienen la alternativa de utilizar los vales para contratar centros de cuidado infantil, proveedores de cuidado infantil familiar, o proveedores informales, quienes pueden ser amigos, vecinos o familiares.

Este informal uso de los vales derrota el propósito de financiar Aprendizaje Temprano NYC para el cuidado infantil educativo.

El último programa era cien por ciento mejor que Aprendizaje Temprano”, dijo Raglan George Jr., Director Ejecutivo del DC 1707.

El último programa era cien por ciento mejor que Aprendizaje Temprano”, dijo Raglan George Jr., Director Ejecutivo del DC 1707.

Como resultado de la alta inscripción de vales y la baja inscripción de Aprendizaje Temprano, ACS ha cambiado los fondos de Aprendizaje Temprano para cubrir el costo de los vales.

Sin embargo, los bajos números de inscripciones afectan a los proveedores, que ya no son pagados en base a su capacidad, sino en su lugar en un promedio diario de inscripciones o asistencia. El cambio en fondos y pago por inscripción plantea preocupaciones en el Concejo y entre defensores que Aprendizaje Temprano no será mantenido por mucho tiempo.

Además, 13,000 miembros de la unión de empleados del cuidado infantil, PC1707, perdieron sus empleos cuando sus centros de cuidado diario cerraron como resultado de la unión.

El estimado fue proporcionado por Raglan George Jr., director ejecutivo de la unión, quien señaló que aproximadamente 70 centros fueron cerrados.

Al momento de la vista, ACS no tenía información del número de empleos y centros que han sido reemplazados, pero señalaron que habían 365 centros en total.

Además, en lugar de la ciudad pagar por los beneficios de los empleados, ahora los centros son directamente responsables de pagar los beneficios, disminuyendo la probabilidad de que sus empleados estarán asegurados.

George Jr. estaba enojado porque la unión estaba diciendo muy poco en el programa.

“No había ninguna prueba de ello, la ciudad solo lo implementó”, dijo. “El último programa era cien por ciento mejor que Aprendizaje Temprano”.

Stephanie Gendell, the Associate Executive Director for Policy and Government Relations at Citizens’ Committee for Children.

Stephanie Gendell, directora ejecutiva asociada del Comité de Ciudadanos para Niños de Relaciones de Política y Gobierno.

Ronald Richter, Comisionado de ACS, en su testimonio durante la vista, pretendió que Aprendizaje Temprano NYC “provee una programación de alta calidad con la ayuda de maestros cualificados y mejores prácticas que han demostrado resultados”.

Los miembros del comité criticaron a ACS por no implementar ninguna medida de rendimiento.

El comisionado Richter, sin embargo, argumentó que “era un poco temprano para comenzar a medir los resultados.”

Mientras tanto, ACS continuará teniendo su rendimiento medido por empleados del cuidado infantil y oficiales electos.

Capacidad insuficiente en el sistema de Aprendizaje Temprano fue un factor de motivación en el desarrollo del sistema discrecional de cuidado infantil financiado por la ciudad.

“Por lo que siempre estábamos gritando y abogando era que nadie debería perder ningún espacio. El cuidado infantil en un punto clave que le permite a los padres continuar trabajando y proveyendo para sus familias”, dijo la concejal Anabel Palma.

“Como madre soltera, se todas las luchas de ir hacia delante y hacia atrás”.

Con el fin de mitigar la pérdida en la capacidad de cuidado infantil financiado provocado por la transición a Aprendizaje Temprano, el Concejo ahora financea programas de cuidado infantil que sirven a cerca de 4,500 niños en la ciudad, y se ha asociado con el Instituto de Desarrollo Profesional de Temprana Infancia de la Universidad de la ciudad de Nueva York para asegurar que se están entregando servicios de alta calidad en los sitios discrecionales.

Para aquellos reunidos el lunes, la preocupación más urgente era el movilizar recursos adicionales.

“La necesidad de calidad en la educación infantil es clara, ya que los estudios prueban que los jóvenes que reciben experiencias de aprendizaje tempranas hacen bien en la escuela porque están bien preparados”, dijo el Concejal King. “Es imperativo que continuemos invirtiendo y fortaleciendo nuestro programa de Aprendizaje Temprano”.