Building a nest for child and mother alike

Construyendo un nido para el niño y la madre por igual

Construyendo un nido para el niño y la madre por igual

  • English
  • Español

Building a nest for child and mother alike

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“I would recommend the Stork’s Nest to anyone,” said Genovena Nieto, 24, who participated in the Union Community Health Center program for expectant mothers.

“I would recommend the Stork’s Nest to anyone,” said Genovena Nieto, 24, who participated in the Union Community Health Center program for expectant mothers.

Genovena Nieto just finished shopping for a new stroller and a baby carrier. She found them both, and didn’t spend a dime.

The new items will come in handy when Nieto has her third child, who is due on the 26th of December, just days after the Christmas holiday. How did she get such a great deal?

Nieto didn’t go to a store, for starters. She went to her local Stork’s Nest. In the Bronx, there is just one, at Union Community Health Center at 2021 Grand Concourse. “I would recommend the Stork’s Nest to anyone,” said Nieto, 26.

The Stork’s Nest at Union Community Health Center is a collaborative initiative between the Center, the March of Dimes and the Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. It is an educational program designed to encourage early prenatal care, which in turn lessens the number of low birth weight babies, premature babies and infant deaths.

The program, which is open to any expectant mother, has encouraged participation by introducing a point system. Participants gain points by attending classes, and fulfilling other necessary milestones, such as getting health insurance and going to the doctor.

At the end of the program, mothers get to “shop” for baby goods using the points they have collected. The goods are donated items collected by the sorority sisters.

Currently, the sorority sponsors 175 Storks Nests throughout the country.

The classes offered through the program are meant to address the mothers’ physical and emotional well-being during their pregnancy, as well as giving them a sense of preparedness.

The classes run the gamut of the mothers’ pre- and post- natal experiences, as they learn about prenatal yoga, different ways of giving birth, breastfeeding.

The expecting mothers also get a tour of the birthing center at St. Barnabas Hospital, helping the, know what to expect.

“Union Community Health Center is proud to host the Stork’s Nest program,” said Nancy Spellman, RN and Chief Operating Officer/Chief Nursing Officer of Union Community Health Center. “The Stork’s Nest program not only encourages women to be proactive about their prenatal care, but provides educational information to pregnant women and their partners, which is crucial in helping babies get a healthy start in life.”

Nieto did not have a favorite class. “I loved all of them,” she said.

Out of 30 expectant mothers in the program, Nieto won the most points.

Stork’s Nest participants celebrate the conclusion of their program at Union Community Health Center with members of the Zeta Phi Beta Sorority and State Senator Gustavo Rivera.

Stork’s Nest participants celebrate the conclusion of their program at Union Community Health Center with members of the Zeta Phi Beta Sorority and State Senator Gustavo Rivera.

While attending all the classes is not mandatory, it is encouraged, and Nieto had perfect attendance, often bringing her husband in tow.

Before graduating, she garnered 2,950 points, and saved hundreds of dollars that would have otherwise been spent on both the stroller and the carrier.

Aside from walking away with tools that will serve her in motherhood, Nieto is also armed with knowledge—and the confidence it brings. Nieto, who already has two children, is always eager to learn more about motherhood.

“I never felt there was a limit to what there is to learn,” she said.

Nieto has already begun to feel the positive impacts of the prenatal program. She applied for the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) program—and has been using breathing and relaxation methods she learned during her yoga class.

“It was really important for me to learn how to control my stress and worry,” said Nieto, who is at once composed and energetic.

Members of Zeta Phi Beta note that the prenatal program provides a comfortable setting where the expectant mothers can learn and relate to each other as peers.

“They [can] get a lot of medical words thrown at them. We make it as easy as possible for them to understand what’s going on,” said Lillian Castro, the sorority’s president.

The program participants hail from some of the Bronx’s most underserved communities; the information and preparation they are provided is intended to empower and educate them at a time that it is most critical for their family’s well-being.

“[This] takes care of one more barrier,” said Castro, herself a mother of two.

“[This program] takes care of one more barrier,” said sorority president Lillian Castro.

“[This program] takes care of one more barrier,” said sorority president Lillian Castro.

Zeta Phi Beta is a service-based sorority.

Though the partnership with Union could have addressed many other Bronx health issues, they decided to tackle prenatal care.

And the program has earned the respect and attention of community stakeholders.

“This program helps expectant mothers in the 33rd Senate District and throughout the Bronx by providing education, referrals, and donations,” said State Senator Gustavo Rivera who attended the graduation ceremony on Nov. 24th.  “By creating a strong support system for them, the program ensures that the next generation of Bronx mothers is prepared for their journey and the challenges that will face them.”

The prenatal heath program was also awarded a certificate of appreciation from the Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr.

“You could pick any health issue to work on,” said Laura Rivera, Director of External Affairs and Community Relations. “The issue of prenatal care definitely serves to improve the community.”

And the enthusiasm has proven, well, contagious for some of the participants.

“I learned so many things I didn’t know,” said Irma Espinoza, who was a first-time participant and is pregnant with her third child. “I would definitely participate again!”

Construyendo un nido para el niño y la madre por igual

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

“I would recommend the Stork’s Nest to anyone,” said Genovena Nieto, 24, who participated in the Union Community Health Center program for expectant mothers.

“Recomendaría la tienda Stork’s Nest a cualquiera,” dijo Genovena Nieto de 24 años de edad, quien participó en el programa del Union Community Health Center para madres embarazadas.

Genovena Nieto acaba de comprar una carriola nueva y un porta bebé.

Encontró las dos cosas y no gastó un centavo.

Los nuevos artículos serán muy útiles cuando Nieto tenga su tercer hijo, que está programado para nacer el 26 de diciembre, pocos días después de las vacaciones de Navidad.

¿Cómo fue que obtuvo tan grandiosa ganga? Para empezar, Nieto no fue a una tienda exactamente. Fue al local de Stork Nest. En el Bronx sólo hay uno, en el Union Community Health Center, ubicado en el número 2021 de Grand Concourse.

“Yo recomendaría Stork Nest a cualquiera”, dijo Nieto, de 26 años.

Stork Nest, del Union Community Health Center, es una iniciativa de colaboración entre el Centro, la organización March of Dimes y la Hermandad Zeta Phi Beta Inc. Consiste en un programa educativo diseñado para fomentar la atención prenatal temprana, que a su vez reduce el número de bebes con bajo peso al nacer, los bebés prematuros y la mortalidad infantil.

El programa, que está abierto a cualquier mujer embarazada, ha fomentado la participación de sus integrantes a través de un sistema de puntos.

Los participantes ganan puntos por asistir a clases y cumpliendo otras actividades, como la obtención de un seguro de salud y visitando al médico.

Al final del programa las madres pueden ir a “comprar” productos para sus bebés con los puntos que hayan acumulado. Los artículos “a la venta” son objetos donados y recolectados por las chicas que forman parte de la de hermandad.

En la actualidad, la hermandad patrocina 175 tiendas Stork Nest en todo el país.

A través de las clases que se ofrecen en el programa se pretende procurar el bienestar físico y emocional de las madres durante el embarazo, así como darles un sentido de preparación.

Las clases cubren toda la gama de experiencias de las madres antes y después del parto, ya que aprenden yoga prenatal, diferentes formas de dar a luz y cómo amamantar.

Las mujeres embarazadas también reciben un recorrido por el centro de maternidad del St. Barnabas Hospital, ayudándoles así a saber qué esperar.

Stork’s Nest participants celebrate the conclusion of their program at Union Community Health Center with members of the Zeta Phi Beta Sorority and State Senator Gustavo Rivera.

Los participantes de Stork Nest celebran la conclusión de su programa en el Union Community Health Center con miembros de la hermandad Zeta Phi Beta y el senador estatal Gustavo Rivera.

“El Union Community Health Center se enorgullece en presentar el programa Stork Nest”, dijo Nancy Spellman, enfermera registrada, jefa directora de operaciones y de Enfermería del Union Community Health Center. “El programa Stork Nest no sólo alienta a las mujeres a hacerse cargo de su cuidado prenatal, sino que además proporciona información educativa a las mujeres embarazadas y sus parejas, lo cual es crucial para ayudar a los bebés a tener un comienzo saludable en la vida.”

Nieto no tenía una clase favorita. “Me encantaron todas ellas”, dijo.

De las 30 mujeres embarazadas en el programa, Nieto ganó la mayor cantidad de puntos.

Aunque la asistencia a todas las clases no es obligatoria, sí es alentada y Nieto tuvo asistencia perfecta, a menudo arrastrando a su marido.

Antes de graduarse obtuvo 2,950 puntos y ahorró cientos de dólares que de otro modo habría  gastado tanto en la carriola como en el porta bebé.

Además de terminar con herramientas útiles para la maternidad, Nieto también está armada con el conocimiento y la confianza que los cursos le dieron.

Nieto, quien ya tiene dos hijos, está siempre dispuesta a aprender más acerca de la maternidad. “Nunca sentí que había un límite a lo que hay que aprender”, dijo.

Nieto ya ha comenzado a sentir los efectos positivos del programa prenatal. Se postuló para el programa Women, Infants and Children (WIC) y ha estado usando los métodos de respiración y técnicas de relajación que aprendió durante su clase de yoga.

“Fue muy importante para mí para aprender a controlar mi estrés y la preocupación”, dijo Nieto, quien es al mismo tiempo tranquila y enérgica.

Union Community Health Center’s Director of External Affairs Laura Rivera, and members of the Zeta Phi Beta Sorority (from left to right) Nilda Rivera; Lillian Castro; Gigi Gilliard; and Bernice Asamoah proudly display the honor bestowed upon them by the Bronx Borough President.

Laura Rivera, directora de Asuntos Exteriores del Union Community Health Center y los miembros de la hermandad Zeta Phi Beta (de izquierda a derecha): Nilda Rivera, Lillian Castro; Gigi Gilliard y Bernice Asamoah muestran con orgullo el honor que les confirió el presidente del condado del Bronx.

Los miembros de la hermandad Zeta Phi Beta notaron que el programa prenatal ofrece un ambiente cómodo en el que futuras madres pueden aprender y se relacionan entre sí como iguales.

“Ellas [pueden] conocer una gran cantidad de términos médicos que escucharon en los cursos. Lo hacemos tan fácil como sea posible para que entiendan lo que está sucediendo “, dijo Lillian Castro, presidenta de la hermandad.

Los participantes del programa provienen de algunas de las comunidades más marginadas del Bronx y la intención es que la información y la preparación que se les ofrece permita capacitarlos y educarlos para este momento tan crítico para su bienestar familiar.

“[El Programa] se ocupa de un obstáculo más”, dijo Castro, quien también es madre de dos hijos.

Zeta Phi Beta es una hermandad basada en servicios.

Aunque la asociación con la Unión podría haber abordado muchos otros problemas de salud del Bronx, decidieron atacar el cuidado prenatal.

Y el programa se ha ganado el respeto y la atención de los actores de la comunidad.

“Este programa ayuda a las mujeres embarazadas en el 33º Distrito del Senado y en el Bronx, proporcionando educación, consultas y donaciones”, dijo el senador estatal Gustavo Rivera, quien asistió a la ceremonia de graduación el 24 de noviembre. “Al crear un sistema de apoyo fuerte para ellas, el programa asegura que la próxima generación de madres del Bronx esté preparada para su aventura y los retos que se le presenten.”

El programa de salud prenatal también recibió un certificado de agradecimiento del presidente del Bronx Rubén Díaz Jr.

“Se puede elegir cualquier tema de salud para trabajar”, dijo Laura Rivera, Directora de Relaciones Externas y Relaciones con la Comunidad. “El tema de la atención prenatal sin duda sirve para mejorar la comunidad”.

Y el entusiasmo se ha demostrado, además, contagiando a algunos de los participantes.

“Aprendí muchas cosas que no sabía”, dijo Irma Espinoza, quien participó por primera vez y está embarazada de su tercer hijo. “¡Sin duda participaría nuevamente!”