LocalNewsOpinion

An immaculate tribute
Un tributo inmaculado

An immaculate tribute

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


The Immaculate Conception Choir performed at a tribute Mass in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
The Immaculate Conception Choir performed at a tribute Mass in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

“We cannot allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence,” said Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

He spoke through the young voice of Edward Tavera, a fifth grader at the Immaculate Conception School this past Sun., Jan. 19th.

It is Tavera’s favorite line in King’s “I Have a Dream” speech.

Tavera and several other students presented the famous speech at the Tenth Annual Martin Luther King Tribute Mass, held at the Church of the Immaculate Conception on East Gunhill Road this past Sun., Jan. 19th.

The Mass has become an important tradition for both the school and the church.

“I feel that Martin Luther King has a great deal of wisdom to teach the people who feel that they will accomplish anything. He compels others to be better people, especially children,” said Sister Leticia Aviles, who has been the school’s principal for 13 years.

The tribute allows students to honor Dr. King and to perform before the rest of the congregation.

“We cannot give up yet,” said guest speaker Tiffani Blake, the Special Assistant to the President for Mission and Board Relations at the College of New Rochelle and the Commissioner of Black Ministry of the Archdiocese of New York City.
“We cannot give up yet,” said guest speaker Tiffani Blake, the Special Assistant to the President for Mission and Board Relations at the College of New Rochelle and the Commissioner of Black Ministry of the Archdiocese of New York City.

This past Sunday, students from the fifth to seventh grades, under the guidance of fifth grade homeroom teacher Mrs. Faye Davis, recited excerpts from Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, as well as Maya Angelou’s poem “Still I Rise.”

Tavera reported that, under the tutelage of his teacher Mrs. Davis, he had learned his part of the speech in an hour. He said that there was much to be learned from the words spoken by Dr. King over 50 years ago.

“It shows how he was a peaceful man,” he said. “He was a man who spoke softly but carried a big stick.”

Sixth grader Damani Thomas also recited excerpts from the speech.

“He understood what people had to go through to get to this country and not have the freedom you deserve,” he observed.

Christopher Zelaya, a fifth grader, read from “Still I Rise.”

“I was nervous,” he admitted. Zelaya had a coping strategy, however. “I looked where there was nobody sitting—in the back.”

Fifth grader Mariyah Domínguez was her class’s assistant director, and memorized the whole poem so she could help her classmates practice their lines.

“My class was amazing in doing its job today,” she concluded after the performance.

Teacher Davis concurred, giving her class an “A” grade for their efforts on Sunday.

She has been in charge of training students for the tribute since its inception ten years ago. The event has a dual purpose, she said: that of honoring Dr. King, while also giving the students an opportunity to engage in public speaking.

"He was a man who spoke softly, but carried a big stick,” said student Edward Tavera, with co-performer Damani Thomas (right).
“He was a man who spoke softly, but carried a big stick,” said student Edward Tavera, with co-performer Damani Thomas (right).

All 38 of her students had a role in executing the tribute.

Davis has ample experience in oratory, as she participated in many recitals when she as a Catholic school student in Jamaica. She recalled the words of one of Marcus Garvey’s speeches, which she performed when she was younger.

“‘Up you mighty race, you can accomplish what you will.’ I use this with the children all the time,” she said.

Sisters Gabriela and Clarisa González were joined by their cousin Andrés González, who attended Immaculate Conception School. The three carried on the tradition of performing at the tribute even though they are now in high school and college.

“It’s exciting. I feel that coming back and seeing how things change brings excitement,” said Gabriela, 14, who has preformed in the tribute Mass since its founding.

“I like that it’s not a tradition that’s been dropped,” said Clarisa, 19, who is enrolled in CUNY’s Macaulay Honors College.

“Every mass is special, but this is more special because it honors Martin Luther King. He is an inspiring man,” said Andres, 15, who still attend Sunday Mass at Immaculate Conception with his family.

Together, the González trio sang “Alma Misionera” in Spanish. The congregation erupted in applause and cheers when they were finished.

“They were perfect,” gushed Juana González, the sisters’ mother, who said the occasion made her especially proud to hear her daughters singing.

“[Dr. King] made it so we could be free and equal,” she said.

“[Dr. King] made it so we could be free and equal,” said Juana González, with her daughter Gabriela, who performed.
“[Dr. King] made it so we could be free and equal,” said Juana González, with her daughter Gabriela, who performed.
The Mass’s guest speaker was Tiffani Blake, the Special Assistant to the President for Mission and Board Relations at the College of New Rochelle and the Commissioner of Black Ministry of the Archdiocese of New York City.

She reminded those gathered that, despite the gains made, there was still work to be done.

“I believe that we have made big strides and are living his dream, but speaking from my heart and personal experience, I find that we still have a ways to go. We cannot give up yet.”

Blake pointed to stop and frisk and lack of accessibility to health care, insurance and education as new points of focus within the civil rights movement.

Like the students who performed, Blake had personal reasons for participating in the Mass; it was the first one at which she had spoken, and her first time attending the Dr. King tribute at Immaculate Conception.

“It was important for me to participate because Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., like other civil rights activists, made it possible for me to take advantage of academic and professional opportunities,” she explained. “I believe that it’s important for someone from my generation to share the impact he’s had on my life because my perspective may inspire young children and teens and be relatable. Remembering Dr. King allows us the chance to reflect on how far we’ve come but also to identify the new obstacles we must overcome in order to fulfill his dream.”

 

Click here for the full text of Blake’s remarks

Un tributo inmaculado

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


The Immaculate Conception Choir performed at a tribute Mass in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
El coro de la iglesia de la Inmaculada Concepción cantaron en una misa en homenaje al Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

“No podemos permitir que nuestra protesta creativa degenere en violencia física”, dijo Martin Luther King Jr.

Habló a través de la joven voz de Edward Tavera, estudiante de quinto grado de la escuela Inmaculada Concepción.

Se trata de la frase favorita de Tavera en el discurso de King “Tengo un sueño”.

Tavera y otros compañeros presentaron el famoso discurso en la décima misa como tributo anual a Martin Luther King, celebrada en la iglesia de la Inmaculada Concepción de East Gunhill Road el pasado domingo 19 de enero.

La misa se ​​ha convertido en una tradición importante para la escuela y la iglesia.

“Siento que Martin Luther King tiene una gran cantidad de sabiduría para enseñar a las personas que sienten que ellos habrán de lograr cualquier cosa. Obliga a otros a ser mejores personas, especialmente a los niños “, dijo la hermana Leticia Avilés, quien ha sido directora de la escuela por 13 años.

"Mi clase fue increíble haciendo su trabajo hoy", dijo Mariyah Domínguez, asistente de dirección de su clase; Christopher Zelaya (derecha) confeso estar un poco nervioso.
“Mi clase fue increíble haciendo su trabajo hoy”, dijo Mariyah Domínguez, asistente de dirección de su clase; Christopher Zelaya (derecha) confeso estar un poco nervioso.

El homenaje permite a los estudiantes honrar al Dr. King y también hacer una presentación ante el resto de la congregación.

El domingo pasado, los estudiantes de quinto a séptimo grados, bajo la dirección de la señora Faye Davis, maestra de grado quinto, recitaron pasajes del discurso del Dr. King “Tengo un sueño”, así como el poema de Maya Angelou “Still I Rise.”

Tavera informó que, bajo la tutela de la Sra. Davis, aprendió su parte del discurso en una hora.

Señaló que había mucho que aprender de las palabras pronunciadas por el Dr. King hace más de 50 años.

“Esto demuestra que era un hombre pacífico”, dijo. “Él era un hombre que hablaba en voz baja, pero llevaba un gran garrote”.

La señora Faye Davis, maestra de grado quinto, ha estado a cargo de formar estudiantes para participar en el  tributo desde su creación hace diez años.
La señora Faye Davis, maestra de grado quinto, ha estado a cargo de formar estudiantes para participar en el tributo desde su creación hace diez años.

Damani Thomas, de sexto grado, también recitó extractos del discurso.

“Él entendió lo que la gente tenía que pasar para llegar a este país y no tener la libertad que merecía”, dijo.

Christopher Zelaya, estudiante de quinto grado, leyó de “Still I Rise.”

“Estaba nervioso”, admitió. Zelaya tenía una estrategia de supervivencia, sin embargo. “Miré hacia donde no había nadie sentado en la parte de atrás”.

Mariyah Domínguez, de quinto grado, fue asistente de dirección de su clase y memorizó el poema entero para poder ayudar a sus compañeros a practicar sus líneas.

“Mi clase fue increíble haciendo su trabajo hoy”, concluyó después de su actuación.

Davis también dio a su clase una “A” de calificación por sus esfuerzos del domingo.

Ella ha estado a cargo de formar estudiantes para participar en el  tributo desde su creación hace diez años. El evento tiene un doble propósito, dijo: el de honrar al Dr. King, y dar a los estudiantes la oportunidad de participar hablando en público.

Los 38 estudiantes de su clase tuvieron un papel en la ejecución del tributo.

De izquierda a derecha: Sub-directora de la escuela Inmaculada Concepción Linda LaPorace; maestra Faye Davis y la hermana Leticia Avilés, quien ha sido directora de la escuela por 13 años.
De izquierda a derecha: Sub-directora de la escuela Inmaculada Concepción Linda LaPorace; maestra Faye Davis y la hermana Leticia Avilés, quien ha sido directora de la escuela por 13 años.

Davis tenía una amplia experiencia haciendo recitales cuando fue a la escuela católica en Jamaica.

Recordó las palabras de uno de los discursos de Marcus Garvey, que realizó cuando era más joven.

“‘Hasta tu raza poderosa puede lograr lo que quiere.” Utilizó esto con los niños todo el tiempo”, dijo.

Las hermanas Gabriela y Clarisa González, y su primo Andrés González, quienes asistieron a la escuela Inmaculada Concepción, continúan la tradición de llevar a cabo el homenaje a pesar de que ahora están en la escuela secundaria y la universidad.

“Es muy emocionante. Siento que volver y ver cómo las cosas cambian crea entusiasmo”, dijo Gabriela, de 14 años y quien ha participado en la misa homenaje desde que fue fundada por primera vez.

“Me gusta que no es una tradición que se ha abandonado”, dijo Clarisa, de 19 años, quien está inscrita en Macaulay Honors College de CUNY.

“Cada misa es especial, pero esta es más especial porque honra a Martin Luther King. Es un hombre inspirador “, dijo Andrés, de 15 años, quien todavía asiste a misa en la Inmaculada Concepción todos los domingos con su familia y sus primos.

Juntos, el trío González cantó “Alma Misionera” en español. La congregación estalló en aplausos y vítores cuando terminaron.

“[Dr. King] made it so we could be free and equal,” said Juana González, with her daughter Gabriela, who performed.
“[Dr. King] lo hizo para que pudiéramos ser libres e iguales”, dijo Juana González, con su hija Gabriela, quien cantó.

“Estuvieron perfectos”, dijo efusivamente Juana González, madre de las hermanas, quien dijo que la ocasión la hizo sentir especialmente orgullosa de escuchar cantar a sus hijas.

“[Dr. King] lo hizo para que pudiéramos ser libres e iguales”, dijo.

La oradora invitada de la misa fue Tiffani Blake, Asistente Especial del Presidente de Misión y Relaciones de la Junta del Colegio New Rochelle y la Comisionada del Ministerio Negro de la Arquidiócesis de la ciudad de Nueva York.

Ella recordó a los reunidos que, a pesar de los avances logrados, todavía queda trabajo por hacer.

“Creo que hemos progresado muchísimo y estamos viviendo su sueño, pero hablando desde mi corazón y mi experiencia personal me parece que todavía nos queda mucho camino por recorrer. No podemos renunciar todavía”.

Blake señaló la política de detención y cacheo, la falta de accesibilidad a los servicios de salud, los seguros y la educación como nuevos enfoques en el movimiento por los derechos civiles.

Al igual que los estudiantes que hicieron la presentación, Blake tenía sus propias razones para participar en la misa, fue la primera en la que habló, y la primera vez que asistía al homenaje al Dr. King en la Inmaculada Concepción.

“Era importante para mí participar porque el Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., al igual que otros activistas de los derechos civiles, hizo posible que yo tomara ventaja de las oportunidades académicas y profesionales”, explicó. “Creo que es importante para alguien de mi generación compartir el impacto que ha tenido en mi vida porque mi perspectiva puede inspirar a niños pequeños y adolescentes. Recordar al Dr. King nos da la oportunidad de reflexionar sobre lo lejos que hemos llegado, pero también de identificar los nuevos obstáculos que debemos superar con el fin de cumplir su sueño”.

Related Articles

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker