Age is nothing but a voter

La edad no es otra cosa que un votante

La edad no es otra cosa que un votante

  • English
  • Español

Age is nothing but a voter

AARP forum draws together critical voter groups

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

A town hall on the mayoral race was held at Hunter College.

A town hall on the mayoral race was held at Hunter College.

In any hotly contested political race, candidates typically relish the opportunity to reach a large segment of likely voters at a single event.

Those vying to become New York City’s next mayor received that chance this past Tues., Aug. 6th at Hunter College, at an expansive town hall sponsored by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), the Hispanic Federation, the Asian American Federation, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO).

An audience of approximately 1,000 people gathered in the Hunter auditorium for the event, which allowed both Democratic and Republican candidates to get their message across to a sizeable cross-section of voters.

The town hall featured mayoral hopefuls Sal Albanese, Adolfo Carrión, John A. Catsimatidis, Bill de Blasio, Joe Lhota, John Liu, George McDonald, Erick Salgado, Bill Thompson and Anthony Weiner. Christine Quinn was invited, but did not attend.

It is estimated that Hispanic, Asian, and African American voters age 50 and above will account for about 47 percent of ballots cast in the upcoming mayoral election.

“The multicultural communities are no longer a minority, and are on the way to becoming a majority of the vote in NYC,” remarked Beth Finkel, New York State Director of AARP.

Research also shows that approximately half of voters in New York City are AARP members.

As Carrión remarked to the town hall crowd, “This audience is a sweet spot for politicians.”

"Searching citizens needs to be done constitutionally," said Democratic candidate Bill de Blasio.

“Searching citizens needs to be done constitutionally,” said Democratic candidate Bill de Blasio.

The event was moderated by Mariela Salgado of Univision 41; candidates were questioned by a panel that included Carolina Leid of WABC-TV, Enrique Teutelo of Univision Noticias 41, Xian Biu of SinoTV and Herb Bond of New York Amsterdam News and City College.

With more than 860,000 registered voters in New York City identified as Latino, the candidates were asked how they would relate to the Latino community if elected.

Catsimatidis, owner of the Gristedes Foods grocery store chain, boasted that 50% of his employees and 70% of his management team are Latino.

Lhota said that he felt that the current mayoral administration suffered from a lack of communication with the Latino community, and vowed to change that if he were elected.

He stated, “I want to be the mayor of all of New York City – white, African American, Latino, everyone.”

Affordable housing was also a topic touched on by several of the candidates.

McDonald, who founded The Doe Fund, an organization that assists the homeless, said that the new mayor needs to build at least 75,000 affordable housing units.

Carrión agreed, “On day one of a Carrión administration, we would declare an affordable housing emergency.”

Weiner was critical of the Bloomberg administration’s handling of fines and inspections for small and immigrant-owned businesses.

“I want to be the mayor of all of New York City,” said Republican candidate Joe Lhota.

“I want to be the mayor of all of New York City,” said Republican candidate Joe Lhota.

He described his idea for the city to use mobile vans that would allow store owners to settle tickets, process paperwork or even challenge fines on the spot, without the need to close their shop.

“All you need on the van is an inspector and a stenographer, and it can be done,” said Weiner. “Don’t make the store owner go downtown to deal with the violation, and possibly lose a day of work.”

The panel and moderator questioned the candidates on whether ID cards should be issued to undocumented immigrants.

“We need to be a humane and compassionate city to all immigrants,” said Carrión.

Lhota cited the cities of Oakland and Houston, who provided immigrants with ID cards, which also double as prepaid debit cards. He said the same system could be viable in New York City.

“Not only would it provide one form of ID, it would allow them to participate in the economy,” he explained.

Liu made reference to his own immigrant origins, as he quipped, “I was made in Taiwan, as they say.”

He told the crowd that he thought ID cards should be issued at the state level for all New Yorkers.

“When immigrants do better, New York does better,” Liu said.

Candidates were also questioned about the controversial topic of stop-and-frisk, and whether the practice has any merit.

The forum drew a crowd of about 1,000 people.

The forum drew a crowd of about 1,000 people.

Salgado said he felt that the real issue was inadequate number of police officers, and vowed to grow the city’s police force and also increase its training.

“There aren’t enough cops in our communities,” he commented.

“Searching citizens needs to be done constitutionally, not based on racial profiling,” said de Blasio. “We care about stopping crime, but we want fairness, we want respect.”

A tense moment took place when candidates Weiner and McDonald, who have sparred at other events, had an exchange in which it appeared that Weiner referred derisively to McDonald, 69, as “Grandpa”.

The encounter prompted a response from Finkel the following day.

“AARP found some of yesterday’s comments regarding age unfortunate, especially at a time when, according to a new AARP survey, nearly one quarter of New York’s 50+ voters say they or a family member have experienced unwelcome comments about their age and nearly half are concerned about age discrimination. A person’s age should not be a factor in politics, or anything else,” she said.

"There aren't enough cops in our communities," said Democratic candidate Erick Salgado.

“There aren’t enough cops in our communities,” said Democratic candidate Erick Salgado.

But attendees at the town hall seemed enthusiastic about getting to know the candidates, and many remarked that they felt the discussion had been largely substantive.

Carol Oliva said she attended the forum to compare their stance on various issues, such as affordable housing and health care.

“It’s great to be able to see them all in one place,” she commented.

Marjorie, a Manhattan voter, said that New Yorkers are fortunate to have so many candidates to choose from in the mayoral race.

“It proves that the state of New York City politics is very vibrant,” she said.

But, as city resident James Diedrich remarked, the real test of the candidates’ worth will come after the election.

“What matters is that they can deliver what they promise,” he said.

The participating organizations have conducted surveys on what Asian, African American/Black and Hispanic/Latino 50+ voters are focusing on in the mayoral race. A full detailing is available online at www.aarp.org/NYC50plus.

La edad no es otra cosa

Foro de AARP reúne grupos críticos de votantes

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

El debate entre candidatos por la alcaldía de la ciudad se dio a cabo en Hunter College.

El debate entre candidatos por la alcaldía de la ciudad se dio a cabo en Hunter College.

En cualquier carrera política muy reñida, los candidatos suelen disfrutar de la oportunidad de llegar a un gran segmento de los posibles votantes en un solo evento.

Aquéllos que compiten para convertirse en el próximo alcalde de la ciudad de Nueva York recibieron esa oportunidad el pasado martes 6 de agosto en el Hunter College, en un auditorio amplio patrocinado por la Asociación Americana de Personas Jubiladas (AARP por sus siglas en inglés), la Federación Hispana, la Federación Asiático Americana, la Asociación Nacional para el Progreso de la Gente de Color (NAACP por sus siglas en inglés), y la Asociación Nacional de Funcionarios Latinos Electos y Designados (NALEO por sus siglas en inglés).

Una audiencia de aproximadamente 1,000 personas se reunió en el auditorio Hunter para el evento, lo que permitió a los candidatos demócratas y republicanos enviar su mensaje a un importante sector de los votantes.

En el debate se presentaron los candidatos a la alcaldía Sal Albanese, Adolfo Carrión, John A. Catsimatidis, Bill de Blasio, Joe Lhota, John Liu, George McDonald, Erick Salgado, Bill Thompson y Anthony Weiner. Christine Quinn fue invitada pero no asistió.

Se estima que los hispanos, asiáticos y africanos americanos votantes de 50 años en adelante representarán alrededor del 47 por ciento de los votos emitidos en la próxima elección para alcalde.

"Registrar a los ciudadanos debe hacerse de acuerdo con la constitución,” dijo el candidato democrático Bill de Blasio.

“Registrar a los ciudadanos debe hacerse de acuerdo con la constitución,” dijo el candidato democrático Bill de Blasio.

“Las comunidades multiculturales ya no son una minoría y están en camino a convertirse en una mayoría de votantes en la ciudad de Nueva York”, comentó Beth Finkel, directora estatal de AARP Nueva York.

La investigación también muestra que aproximadamente la mitad de los votantes de la ciudad de Nueva York son los miembros de AARP.

Como Carrión comentó a la multitud en el auditorio: “Esta audiencia es un punto clave para los políticos”.

El evento fue moderado por Mariela Salgado de Univision 41, los candidatos fueron cuestionados por un panel que incluyó a Carolina Leid de WABC-TV, Enrique Teutelo de Univision Noticias 41, Xian Biu de SinoTV y Herb Bonos de New York Amsterdam News y City College.

Con más de 860,000 votantes registrados en la ciudad de Nueva York identificados como latinos, se preguntó a los candidatos cómo se relacionarían con la comunidad hispana si fuesen elegidos.

Catsimatidis, propietario de la cadena de tiendas de alimentos comestibles Gristedes, se jactó de que el 50% de sus empleados y el 70% de su equipo gerencial son latinos. Lhota, dijo que la administración actual sufrió de una falta de comunicación con la comunidad latina, y se comprometió a cambiar eso si fuese elegido.

Dijo: “Quiero ser el alcalde de toda la ciudad de Nueva York, blancos, afroamericanos, latinos, todo el mundo”.

La vivienda asequible también fue un tema abordado por varios de los candidatos.

"No hay suficientes policías en nuestras comunidades", comentó el candidato democrático Erick Salgado.

“No hay suficientes policías en nuestras comunidades”, comentó el candidato democrático Erick Salgado.

McDonald, quien fundó The Doe Fund, una organización que ayuda a las personas sin hogar, dijo que el nuevo alcalde tiene que construir al menos 75,000 unidades de vivienda asequible.

Carrión estuvo de acuerdo: “En el primer día de una administración Carrión, queremos declarar una emergencia de vivienda asequible”.

Weiner criticó el manejo de las multas e inspecciones de la administración Bloomberg para los pequeños negocios y de propiedad de inmigrantes.

Él describió su idea de utilizar unidades móviles que permitan a los propietarios manejar multas, procesar los documentos o incluso cuestionar las multas en el acto, sin necesidad de cerrar la tienda.

“Todo lo que necesitas en la camioneta es un inspector y un estenógrafo, y se puede hacer”, dijo Weiner. “No hagamos que el dueño de la tienda vaya ‘downtown’ para hacer frente a la violación y posiblemente pierda un día de trabajo”.

El panel y el moderador preguntaron a los candidatos si las tarjetas de identidad deben concederse a los inmigrantes indocumentados.

“Tenemos que ser una ciudad humana y compasiva con todos los inmigrantes”, dijo Carrión.

Lhota citó las ciudades de Oakland y Houston, que proporcionan a los inmigrantes tarjetas de identificación, las cuales también sirven como tarjetas de débito prepagadas. Dijo que el mismo sistema podría ser viable en la ciudad de Nueva York.

“No sólo sería proporcionar una forma de identificación, sino que les permitiría participar en la economía”, explicó.

Liu hizo referencia a sus propios orígenes inmigrantes, diciendo en broma: “Yo fui hecho en Taiwán, como se dice”.

    Una audiencia de aproximadamente 1,000 personas se reunió para el evento.

Una audiencia de aproximadamente 1,000 personas se reunió para el evento.

Le dijo a la multitud que pensaba que las tarjetas de identidad debían ser emitidas a nivel estatal para todos los neoyorquinos.

“Cuando a los inmigrantes les va mejor, a Nueva York le va mejor”, dijo Liu. Los candidatos también fueron cuestionados sobre el controversial tema de las detenciones y cacheos, y si la práctica tiene algún mérito.

Salgado dijo que sentía que el verdadero problema era el número insuficiente de agentes de policía, y se comprometió a aumentar la fuerza policial de la ciudad y también a mejorar su formación.

“No hay suficientes policías en nuestras comunidades”, comentó.

“Registrar a los ciudadanos debe hacerse de acuerdo con la constitución y no basados en la discriminación racial”, dijo de Blasio. “Nos preocupamos por detener el crimen, pero queremos justicia, queremos respeto”.

Un momento de tensión se produjo cuando los candidatos Weiner y McDonald, quienes han discutido en otros eventos, tuvieron un intercambio en el que parecía que Weiner se refería despectivamente a McDonald, de 69 años, como “el abuelo”.

El encuentro provocó una respuesta de Finkel el día siguiente.

    “Quiero ser el alcalde de toda la ciudad de Nueva York,” dijo el candidato republicano Joe Lhota.

“Quiero ser el alcalde de toda la ciudad de Nueva York,” dijo el candidato republicano Joe Lhota.

“AARP encontró algunos de los comentarios de ayer respecto a la edad desafortunados, sobre todo en un momento en que, según una nueva encuesta de AARP, casi una cuarta parte de los votantes de Nueva York de más de 50 años dicen que ellos, o un miembro de su familia, han experimentado comentarios desagradables acerca de su edad y casi la mitad se preocupan por la discriminación por edad. La edad de una persona no debe ser un factor en la política, o cualquier otra cosa “, dijo.

Pero los asistentes al foro parecían entusiasmados por conocer a los candidatos y muchos comentaron que sentían que el debate había sido en gran medida sustancioso.

Carol Oliva dijo que asistió al foro para comparar sus posiciones sobre diversos temas, tales como la vivienda asequible y la atención a la salud.

“Es genial poder verlos a todos en un solo lugar”, comentó.

Marjorie, una votante de Manhattan, dijo que los neoyorquinos tienen la suerte de tener varios candidatos para elegir en la carrera por la alcaldía.

“Esto demuestra que el estado de la política de la ciudad de Nueva York es muy dinámica”, dijo.

Pero, como el residente de la ciudad James Diedrich comentó, la verdadera prueba de valor de los candidatos vendrá después de las elecciones.

“Lo que importa es que puedan cumplir lo que prometen”, dijo.

Las organizaciones participantes han llevado a cabo encuestas sobre los temas en los que los votantes mayores de 50 años asiáticos, africano americanos/negros y latinos/hispanos, se están centrando en la carrera por la alcaldía. El detalle completo está disponible en línea en www.aarp.org/NYC50plus.