EducationHealthLocalNews

A way with words
Una opción con las palabras

A way with words

UCHC program helps speech-delayed children to talk

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen


“He's made great strides,” says Ernesto De Genova, a bilingual speech and language pathologist at Union Community Health Center (UCHC), of his three-year-old patient Pedro.
“He’s made great strides,” says Ernesto De Genova, a bilingual speech and language pathologist at Union Community Health Center (UCHC), of his three-year-old patient Pedro.

Pedro González, nearly three years old, repeats words from a children’s story book.

As he winds down, and his spiky Mohawk bobs along, he flashes a satisfied grin.

His parents, Christina Flores and José Ángel González, also smile broadly as they hear him speak.

Such a scene might not seem that unusual with a child Pedro’s age, but it is landmark for this family.

Only three months earlier, Pedro could barely say any words at all.

The family is seated in the office of Ernesto De Genova, a bilingual speech and language pathologist at Union Community Health Center (UCHC) in the Bronx.

Since July, De Genova has worked with Pedro to overcome delays in speech development.

“He’s made great strides, and can communicate better with his parents and others,” said De Genova of Pedro, one of the many young patients the voice specialist has aided.

Speech professionals insist that common misconceptions exist when it comes to language delays in children – often, parents assume that some kids simply take longer than others to begin speaking, or that “they’ll talk when they’re ready,” and therefore delay taking their child to a speech or language therapist.

“It's incredible,” says Pedro’s mother Christina Flores, with his father José Ángel González, of her son’s progress.
“It’s incredible,” says Pedro’s mother Christina Flores, with his father José Ángel González, of her son’s progress.

“The expectation is that the child will learn to talk by him or herself,” said Marianne Santalone-Certa, Director of Speech pathology and audiology at UCHC.

“That’s not always the case,” she added, “and by waiting too long children can have issues that are more difficult to correct when they are older and be candidates for academic and social difficulties down the road.”

Experts indicate that parents should take early action if their child is not vocalizing.

“If children are not babbling or making sounds at five to seven months, parents should report it to their pediatrician,” explained De Genova.

Pathologists can diagnose children as young as eight months for speech or hearing problems, and can use a variety of therapies to correct problems involving speech delays, articulation or voice.

Santalone-Certa remarked, “A good part of our job is educating the parents and, to some extent, the pediatricians in terms of referring patients who may be delayed in speech or have problems saying certain sounds.”

Flores and González sought assistance for Pedro after recognizing the boy could speak very few words after age two, and how difficult he was to understand when he did attempt to talk.

“Even if he tried to repeat words back, it would come out sounding completely different,” said his mother.

Patients perform oral motor exercises using small plastic tools to help train the tongue.
Patients perform oral motor exercises using small plastic tools to help train the tongue.

A friend of Flores had their own toddler with speech delays, who made notable improvements after beginning therapy with UCHC’s speech pathology program.

“I saw the results firsthand and knew they could help my son,” said Flores.

De Genova, an Argentina native who also worked in Europe prior to coming to the United States in 2005, begins his sessions by allowing children to play with blocks, to improve cognitive skills and also entice them to cooperate with the exercises.

“The toys are used for motivation,” he commented, “and to build trust.”

De Genova added that all of the senses should be engaged in order to stimulate the brain. “Eyes, ears and nose are like open doors for information to enter,” he remarked.

Though many child speech issues are caused by hearing problems, it is not always the case.

“Sometimes children can hear perfectly, but their brains can’t process the information,” said De Genova. “As a consequence, the kids can’t imitate a series of sounds and build a word.”

As certain neurons in the brain are in charge of imitation, “we’re trying to connect those neurons with others in the system, so the children can mimic sounds and then words,” noted De Genova.

“If children are not making sounds at five to seven months, parents should report it to their pediatrician,” explained De Genova.
“If children are not making sounds at five to seven months, parents should report it to their pediatrician,” explained De Genova.

Eventually, one word joins another and the child can form a phrase or short sentence.

De Genova has his patients perform oral motor exercises using small plastic tools, such as a whistle, to improve speech production by training the tongue and jaw.

He also employs a tactile approach, known as PROMPT, that uses touch cues to manually guide patients through a targeted word, phrase or sentence.

During therapy sessions with Pedro, De Genova touches a wand to points on the child’s face in order to elicit muscle movements from his mouth, helping the toddler form words he reads from a book.

Pedro, who visits UCHC twice a week, also kisses a small mouse toy and blows bubbles to improve muscle input.

“When I first saw Pedro, he wasn’t able to put two sounds together,” stated De Genova. “Now he can say three-syllable words.”

“It’s incredible,” remarked Flores.

Aided by special books and materials, Pedro’s parents perform speech exercises with him at home several times daily, to reinforce what occurs in the therapy sessions.

Flores said that the change in her son since working with UCHC has been dramatic.

“When we first started, we couldn’t get him to sit down and look at a book, but now he loves to do it,” she explained, beaming.  “We’re thrilled because our son can now communicate better and will be more prepared to attend school.”

One glance at the proud smiles of Pedro and his family offers its own proof of progress.

For more information about Union Community Health Center and its services, visit www.uchcbronx.org or call 718.220.2020.


One of Ernesto De Genova’s techniques to help his speech therapy patients is called PROMPT.
Una de las técnicas de Ernesto De Génova para ayudar a sus pacientes de terapia del lenguaje se llama PROMPT.

What is PROMPT?

PROMPT is an acronym for Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets. The technique is a tactile-kinesthetic approach that uses touch cues to a patient’s articulators (jaw, tongue, lips) to manually guide them through a targeted word, phrase or sentence. The technique develops motor control and the development of proper oral muscular movements, while eliminating unnecessary muscle movements, such as jaw sliding and inadequate lip rounding.

Una opción con las palabras

Programa UCHC ayuda a niños con retraso del habla

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen


“He's made great strides,” says Ernesto De Genova, a bilingual speech and language pathologist at Union Community Health Center (UCHC), of his three-year-old patient Pedro.
“Ha tenido gran progreso”, dijo Ernesto De Génova, patólogo bilingüe de idiomas y del habla del Centro de Salud Comunitaria Unión (UCHC), de su paciente de tres años de edad, Pedro.

Pedro González, de casi tres años de edad, repite las palabras del libro de cuentos para niños.

Mientras él va más despacio, y su puntiagudo Mohawk avanza, se esboza una sonrisa de satisfacción.

Sus padres, Christina Flores y José Ángel González, también sonríen ampliamente al escucharlo hablar.

Esta escena podría no parecer tan inusual para un niño de la edad de Pedro, pero es histórico para esta familia.

Sólo tres meses antes, Pedro casi no podía decir ninguna palabra.

La familia está sentada en la oficina de Ernesto De Génova, un patólogo bilingüe de idiomas y del habla del Centro de Salud Comunitaria Unión (UCHC) en el Bronx.

Desde julio, De Génova ha trabajado con Pedro para superar sus retrasos en el desarrollo del habla.

“Él ha hecho grandes progresos, se puede comunicar mejor con sus padres y otras personas”, dijo De Génova sobre Pedro, uno de los muchos pacientes jóvenes a los que el especialista de voz ha ayudado.

Los profesionales del lenguaje insisten en que existen errores comunes cuando se trata de retrasos en el lenguaje en los niños, a menudo, los padres asumen que algunos niños simplemente tardan más que otros en comenzar a hablar, o que “van a hablar cuando estén listos”, y por lo tanto, retrasan el llevar a su hijo a un terapeuta del habla o lenguaje.

“It's incredible,” says Pedro’s mother Christina Flores, with his father José Ángel González, of her son’s progress.
“Es increíble”, dijo la madre de Pedro, Christina Flores, con su padre, José Ángel González, del progreso de su hijo.

“La expectativa es que el niño va a aprender a hablar por sí mismo”, dijo Marianne Santalone-Certa, directora de patología del habla y audiología en UCHC.

“Ese no es siempre el caso”, añadió, “y por esperar demasiado tiempo los niños pueden tener problemas más difíciles de corregir cuando son mayores, además de convertirse en candidatos para dificultades académicas y sociales en el futuro”.

Los expertos indican que los padres deben tomar medidas antes de tiempo si su hijo no está vocalizando.

“Si los niños no están balbuceando o haciendo sonidos entre los cinco y siete meses, los padres deben informar a su pediatra”, explicó De Génova.

Un patólogo puede diagnosticar a niños de hasta ocho meses de edad respecto a problemas del habla o de audición, y pueden usar una variedad de terapias para corregir problemas relacionados con retrasos en el habla, la articulación o la voz.

Santalone Certa-comentó: “Una buena parte de nuestro trabajo es educar a los padres, y en cierta medida a los pediatras, en cuanto a referir a pacientes que pueden tener retraso en el habla o que tengan problemas diciendo ciertos sonidos”.

Flores y González buscaron ayuda para Pedro tras reconocer que el niño podía decir unas pocas palabras después de los dos años de edad, y lo difícil que era entenderlo cuando hacía intentos por hablar.

Patients perform oral motor exercises using small plastic tools to help train the tongue.
Los pacientes realizan ejercicios motores orales usando herramientas pequeñas de plástico para ayudarlos a entrenar la lengua.

“Aún cuando intentaba repetir palabras, sonaba completamente diferente”, dijo su madre.

Un amigo de Flores tuvo un niño con retrasos en el habla, quien logró mejoras notables después de comenzar la terapia con el programa de patología del habla en UCHC.

“He visto los resultados de primera mano y sabía que podían ayudar a mi hijo”, dijo Flores.

De Génova, un nativo de Argentina quien también trabajó en Europa antes de venir a los Estados Unidos en 2005, comienza sus sesiones permitiendo que los niños jueguen con bloques, para mejorar sus habilidades cognitivas, así como atraerlos para cooperar con los ejercicios.

“Los juguetes se utilizan como motivación”, comentó, “y para generar confianza”.

De Génova agregó que todos los sentidos deben ocuparse con el fin de estimular al cerebro. “Los ojos, los oídos y la nariz son como puertas abiertas para la información “, remarcó.

Aunque muchos aspectos del lenguaje del niño se deben a problemas de audición, no siempre es el caso.

“A veces los niños pueden oír perfectamente, pero su cerebro no puede procesar la información”, dijo De Génova. “Como consecuencia, los niños no pueden imitar una serie de sonidos y construir una palabra”.

Mientras ciertas neuronas en el cerebro se encargan de imitar, “estamos tratando de conectar las neuronas con otras en el sistema, para que los niños puedan imitar los sonidos y luego las palabras”, señaló De Génova.

"Si los niños no están haciendo sonidos entre los cinco y siete meses, los padres deben informar a su pediatra", explicó De Génova.
“Si los niños no están haciendo sonidos entre los cinco y siete meses, los padres deben informar a su pediatra”, explicó De Génova.

Finalmente, una palabra se une a otra y el niño puede formar una frase o una oración corta.

De Génova hace que sus pacientes realicen ejercicios motores orales utilizando pequeñas herramientas de plástico, como un silbato, para mejorar la producción del habla entrenando la lengua y la mandíbula.

También emplea un método táctil, conocido como PROMPT, que utiliza señales táctiles para guiar manualmente a los pacientes a través de una palabra específica, frase u oración.

Durante las sesiones de terapia con Pedro, De Génova señala con una varita la cara del niño con el fin de provocar movimientos de los músculos de la boca, lo que ayuda a los niños pequeños a formar las palabras que lee de un libro.

Pedro, quien visita UCHC dos veces por semana, también besa un ratón de juguete pequeño y sopla burbujas para mejorar los músculos.

“Cuando vi por primera vez a Pedro, no fue capaz de unir dos sonidos”, afirmó De Génova. “Ahora puede decir palabras de tres sílabas”.

“Es increíble”, remarcó Flores.

Con la ayuda de libros y materiales especiales, los padres de Pedro realizan ejercicios del habla con él en su casa varias veces al día, para reforzar lo que ocurre en las sesiones de terapia.

Flores dijo que el cambio de su hijo desde que trabaja con UCHC ha sido espectacular.

“Cuando empezamos, no podíamos lograr que se sentara y mirara un libro, pero ahora le encanta hacerlo”, explicó, sonriendo. “Estamos muy contentos porque nuestro hijo ahora puede comunicarse mejor y estará más preparado para asistir a la escuela”.

Un vistazo a las sonrisas orgullosas de Pedro y su familia son la mejor prueba de progreso.

Para más información sobre el Centro de Salud Comunitaria Unión y sus servicios, visite  www.uchcbronx.org o llame al 718.220.2020.


One of Ernesto De Genova’s techniques to help his speech therapy patients is called PROMPT.
Una de las técnicas de Ernesto De Génova para ayudar a sus pacientes de terapia del lenguaje se llama PROMPT.

¿Qué es PROMPT?

PROMPT es el acrónimo para Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets (Puntos para la reestructuración de objetivos musculares orales y fonéticos). La técnica es un método táctil-kinestésico que utiliza señales táctiles para los articuladores de un paciente (mandíbula, lengua, labios) para guiarlos de forma manual a través de una palabra específica, frase u oración. La técnica desarrolla el control motor y el desarrollo de los movimientos musculares orales adecuados, mientras que elimina los movimientos musculares innecesarios, tales como deslizar la mandíbula o el redondeo inadecuado de los labios.

Related Articles

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker