A potent pill
La potencia en píldora

  • English
  • Español

A potent pill

Oral insulin undergoes local clinical trials

Story by Gregg McQueen and Sherry Mazzocchi

Oramed Chief Executive Officer Nadav Kidron says the drug could be the “Holy Grail of diabetes care.”

Oramed Chief Executive Officer Nadav Kidron
says the drug could be the “Holy Grail of
diabetes care.”

It will be the “Holy Grail” of care.

A new oral insulin drug now being tested in the Bronx is also being touted by its maker’s CEO as one that could dramatically improve the lives of diabetes patients.

The oral insulin, developed by Oramed Pharmaceuticals Inc., is intended to alleviate the need for people with Type 2 diabetes to administer insulin by injection.

Oramed Chief Executive Officer Nadav Kidron says the drug could be the “Holy Grail of diabetes care.”

The form of insulin that can be taken by pill will begin Stage 2b human clinical trials at the CHEAR Center, a medical research center on Prospect Avenue.

During the Bronx trial, participants will take Oramed’s insulin pill for 90 days, with different groups attempting various dosing regimens. The study is designed to show the product’s effectiveness at lowering glycated hemoglobin, a determinant of average blood sugar levels, which is considered the gold standard by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) when evaluating the drug’s efficacy.

Participants are now being recruited for the study, which will be conducted at multiple research centers around the U.S. in addition to CHEAR. A total of 285 adults over the age of 18 will take part.

A potent pill.

A potent pill.

Though scientists have tried for years to develop a form of oral insulin, they have been unsuccessful until now.

“It’s been difficult to deliver insulin orally due to gastric acidity and getting it to the liver from the bloodstream,” said Dr. Adurthy Shankar, an investigator associated with the clinical trial.

“Oral insulin has the potential to transform healthcare – patients will have a better quality of life if they’re able to take a pill,” argued Shankar, who serves as Medical Director of Essen Medical Associates, which runs 21 health centers in the Bronx and is working with CHEAR Center to recruit subjects for the study.

The current 90-day trial is a crucial step for the drug to eventually receive approval by the FDA and eventually be brought to market.

In earlier trials, which lasted for 28 days, Oramed’s oral insulin product – known as ORMD-0801 – demonstrated significant ability to lower glucose levels in patients with no serious side effects.

“This would create a paradigm shift in how we treat diabetes,” said Dr. Adurthy Shankar.

“This would create a paradigm shift in how we
treat diabetes,” said Dr. Adurthy Shankar.

“In less than a year from now,” predicted Kidron, “we will better know the potential of our drug to control and maintain blood glucose levels and should have further proof of the longer-term benefits of taking an oral pill versus an injection.”

Kidron explained that oral insulin is more efficient than injectable insulin because it mimics the body’s natural process of insulin going directly to the liver rather than via the bloodstream.

He said Oramed developed an enteric coding that allows the pill to withstand the acidity of the stomach and other degradation after ingestion.

“It’s only after moving from the stomach to the intestine that the coating dissolves,” Kidron said. “We also have a protein inhibitor which basically acts like a shield that protects it from the degradation and allows us to deliver [insulin] into the portal vein and from there into the liver.”

For Kidron, the development of the oral insulin is somewhat of a family affair. The technology is largely based on work conducted by his mother, Miriam, a researcher at Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem.

The drug is intended to alleviate the need to administer insulin by injection.

The drug is intended to alleviate the need to
administer insulin by injection.

He said that Oramed is looking to publish the results of the clinical trial in about 10 months.

In 2015, an estimated 1.6 million deaths worldwide were directly caused by diabetes, according to the World Health Organization.

“This technology can make [people’s] lives much better. It can result in people not only having a better quality of life but also a better level of health,” he said.

Shankar said that diabetes patients will likely have better compliance for treating themselves with insulin if they can simply swallow a pill, which can be ingested anywhere, instead of taking time to inject themselves and continuously monitor glucose levels.

“It will help a person feel much more normal if they can take a pill rather than an injection,” he said.

He noted that conducting the clinical trial in the Bronx, which has a high rate of diabetes, has significance, as many borough residents could be assisted by the drug if brought to market.

“The true health outcomes of this will take much longer to determine, but I do think this will be very helpful to improving care,” Shankar said. “I think this would create a paradigm shift in how we treat diabetes.”

 

For more information, visit www.oramed.com.

La potencia en píldora

Insulina oral se somete a ensayos clínicos

Historia por Gregg McQueen y Sherry Mazzocchi

El director general de Oramed, Nadav Kidron, dice que el medicamento podría ser el "Santo Grial de la atención de la diabetes".

El director general de Oramed, Nadav Kidron,
dice que el medicamento podría ser el “Santo
Grial de la atención de la diabetes”.

Será el “Santo Grial” del cuidado.

Un nuevo medicamento de insulina oral que se estará probando en el Bronx está siendo promocionado por el director general de su fabricante como uno que podría mejorar dramáticamente la vida de los pacientes con diabetes.

La insulina oral, desarrollada por Oramed Pharmaceuticals Inc., está destinada a aliviar la necesidad de que las personas con diabetes tipo 2 reciban insulina inyectada.

El director general de Oramed, Nadav Kidron, dice que la droga podría ser el “Santo Grial de la atención de la diabetes”.

La forma de insulina que puede tomarse por píldora comenzará los ensayos clínicos en humanos de la Etapa 2b en el Centro CHEAR, un centro de investigación médica en la avenida Prospect.

Durante el ensayo del Bronx, los participantes tomarán la píldora de insulina de Oramed durante 90 días, con diferentes grupos intentando varios regímenes de dosificación. El estudio está diseñado para mostrar la efectividad del producto para reducir la hemoglobina glucosilada, un determinante de los niveles promedio de azúcar en la sangre, que es considerado el estándar de oro por la Administración de Alimentos y Medicamentos (FDA, por sus siglas en inglés) cuando se evalúa la eficacia del medicamento.

Los participantes ahora están siendo reclutados para el estudio, que se llevará a cabo en otros tres centros de investigación en los Estados Unidos además de CHEAR. Un total de 285 adultos mayores de 18 años participarán.

Una píldora potente.

Una píldora potente.

Aunque los científicos han intentado durante años desarrollar una forma de insulina oral, hasta ahora no han tenido éxito.

“Ha sido difícil administrar la insulina por vía oral debido a la acidez gástrica y el llegar al hígado desde el torrente sanguíneo”, dijo el Dr. Adurthy Shankar, un investigador asociado con el ensayo clínico.

“La insulina oral tiene el potencial de transformar la atención médica: los pacientes tendrán una mejor calidad de vida si pueden tomar una píldora”, argumentó Shankar, quien se desempeña como director médico de Asociados Médicos Essen, que dirige 21 centros de salud en el Bronx y está trabajando con el Centro CHEAR para reclutar sujetos para el estudio.

La prueba actual de 90 días es un paso crucial para que el medicamento reciba la aprobación de la FDA y eventualmente sea llevado al mercado.

En ensayos anteriores, que duraron 28 días, el producto de insulina oral de Oramed, conocido como ORMD-0801, demostró una capacidad significativa para disminuir los niveles de glucosa en pacientes sin efectos secundarios graves.

"Esto crearía un cambio de paradigma en la forma en que tratamos la diabetes", dijo el Dr. Adurthy Shankar.

“Esto crearía un cambio de paradigma en la
forma en que tratamos la diabetes”, dijo el
Dr. Adurthy Shankar.

“Dentro de menos de un año”, predijo Kidron, “conoceremos mejor el potencial de nuestro medicamento para controlar y mantener los niveles de glucosa en la sangre y deberíamos tener pruebas adicionales de los beneficios a largo plazo de tomar una píldora oral en lugar de una inyección”.

Kidron explicó que la insulina oral es más eficaz que la inyectable porque imita el proceso natural de la insulina en el cuerpo, yendo directamente al hígado en lugar de a través del torrente sanguíneo.

Dijo que Oramed desarrolló una codificación entérica que permite que la píldora resista la acidez del estómago y otra degradación después de la ingestión.

“Es solo después de pasar del estómago al intestino que el recubrimiento se disuelve”, dijo Kidron. “También tenemos un inhibidor de proteínas que básicamente actúa como un escudo, protegiéndola de la degradación y permitiéndonos administrar [insulina] en la vena porta y de allí al hígado”.

Para Kidron, el desarrollo de la insulina oral es un asunto de familia. La tecnología se basa en gran medida en el trabajo realizado por su madre, Miriam, investigadora del Centro Médico Hadassah en Jerusalén.

El medicamento busca aliviar la necesidad de administrar insulina por inyección.

El medicamento busca aliviar la necesidad de
administrar insulina por inyección.

Dijo que Oramed está buscando publicar los resultados del ensayo clínico en aproximadamente 10 meses.

En 2015, aproximadamente 1.6 millones de muertes en todo el mundo fueron causadas directamente por la diabetes, de acuerdo con la Organización Mundial de la Salud.

“Esta tecnología puede mejorar la vida de las personas. Puede resultar en que las personas no solo tengan una mejor calidad de vida sino también un mejor nivel de salud”, dijo.

Shankar explicó que los pacientes con diabetes probablemente tendrán un mejor cumplimiento del tratamiento con insulina si pueden simplemente tragar una píldora, que puede ingerirse en cualquier lugar, en lugar de tomarse el tiempo para inyectarse y controlar continuamente los niveles de glucosa.

“Ayudará a que la persona se sienta mucho más normal si puede tomar una píldora en lugar de una inyección”, dijo.

Señaló que la realización del ensayo clínico en el Bronx, condado con una alta tasa de diabetes, tiene importancia, ya que muchos residentes podrían ser asistidos por el medicamento si es llevado al mercado.

“Los verdaderos resultados de salud de esto tomarán mucho más tiempo en ser determinados, pero creo que esto será muy útil para mejorar la atención”, dijo Shankar. “Pienso que esto crearía un cambio de paradigma en la forma en que tratamos la diabetes”.

 

Para obtener más información, visite www.oramed.com.