A mother like no other
Una madre como ninguna otra

  • English
  • Español

A mother like no other

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

Sherise Martínez, of the Acacia Network, was recently recognized at the First Annual Mamás Latinas Awards Gala.

Sherise Martínez, of the Acacia Network, was recently recognized at the First Annual Mamás Latinas Awards Gala.

Great mothers are often considered unsung heroes.

But Bronxite Sherise Martínez got her turn in the spotlight when the young mother was honored recently at the First Annual Mamás Latinas Awards Gala.

The Gala, held this past month together with The Hispanic Federation, honors Latina mothers who have proven as capable in their work as caregivers as they have in taking on specific civic and social challenges.

As a reward for their dedication to both their families and their communities, the selected awardees each received $5,000.

The funds will be used for the community cause of the awardee’s choice.

Martínez’s coworkers at The Acacia Network’s Casa Promesa, where she is a counselor for HIV-positive teenagers and those in are recovery from substance abuse, encouraged her to apply for the award in July.

She was hesitant.

“I just became a mom,” she explained. “My daughter is only 14 months old.”

Yet, the same maternal drive is what compels her work.

Martínez’s long-standing call to service has been reinforced by the desire to make the world a better place for her daughter.

“I was blessed by my daughter coming into my life. It brought a really different lens for me to look through,” she said.

Martínez detailed her thoughts: “When she is out in the world, I ask, ‘What can I do to create a better place for her?

What can I do create [positive] change for some of the people she’s going to have to interact with later in her life?’”
Even before motherhood, Martínez has been on a life mission to help others.

Her daughter is a chief motivation: “She is my lifeline.”

Her daughter is a chief motivation: “She is my lifeline.”

At just age 14, she volunteered for The Hetrick-Martin Institute, an organization in the West Village that provides a safe place for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) youth, who often are ostracized from their families and homes.

There, LGBT teens are made to feel comfortable in a way few ever felt anywhere else. There is a poetry center, a lounge with games, and it was welcome to everyone.

The staff and visitors make dinner together and everyone joins in to share meals.

“It was nice, because it felt like a family unit,” recalled Martínez of her time there as a volunteer.

At night, Martínez and other volunteers did overnight outreach, hopping into a van to find teenagers out on their luck and on the street. They would distribute condoms and food, encouraging them to come to the center and off the streets.

Martínez’s warm aura and her persistent smile make it easy to open up to her, a boon to someone who has made it her life’s work to help others.

But it is not just her friendliness that earns her patient’s trust; it’s first-hand knowledge that has lent her wisdom beyond her years.

As a teenager, she was met with hostility when she came out as a lesbian.

Rather than becoming embittered, she became an advocate, and went to Hetrick-Martin to help others.

The, at age 17, Martínez enlisted in the U.S. Navy after 9/11, and was part of the force until last year.

She openly describes the past two years as the most difficult time in her life.

While Martínez unambiguously considers her daughter a blessing, the circumstances of her pregnancy were not.

Her pregnancy was more than just unplanned; Martínez was raped.

Martínez is seeking to create a center for disconnected youth in the South Bronx.

Martínez is seeking to create a center for disconnected youth in the South Bronx.

Martínez does not talk about the specifics, and stressed only that having a daughter has changed her life.

“My heart is no longer in my chest, my heart is with my child wherever she may be,” she explained. “She is my lifeline.”

There are no edges in her speech or affect, little sense of the hurt that has been visited, repeatedly, upon her.

Instead, Martínez exudes light.

As her co-workers have noted, she holds endless reserves of compassion for her clients.

“Getting to work is the gas for my go-cart,” she smiled. “You see little changes start to happen. Those are the things that lift your spirits when you’re not just worried about you.”

Many of the teenaged victims of substance abuse and HIV come to her lacking health insurance, family support and most importantly, hope. Many have parents who are also users.

As a counselor, Martínez serves as a big sister, cheerleader, and life mentor to her patients. She is often the only person they know who has had experience outside the pipeline of poverty, and to whom they can speak to about college applications, financial aid, and getting a job.

“A lot of the time these kids don’t have someone to say, ‘I’ve been there already, I know what it’s like.’”

Martínez knows that you can’t change someone’s life overnight, but one of her biggest feats is changing someone’s life in 72 hours.

At Acacia, she works to empower and support youths. “My goal is to change something for someone who can change something for another person,” she explains.

At Acacia, she works to empower and support youths. “My goal is to change something for someone who can change something for another person,” she explains.

One of her clients was an HIV-positive youth who had been expelled from the State University of New York in New Paltz, where he had been awarded a full scholarship.

The scholarship had taken him from the Dominican Republic to upstate New York, on what would have been a major break in his dream to become a designer.

In a seeming reversal of fortune, the student was diagnosed with HIV.

Not being able to afford alternative housing, the student was expelled for endangering other students on campus.  The young man arrived at Casa Promesa with no money, no insurance, no visa, and little hope.

Then he met Martínez.

“Within 72 hours, I was able to get him housing and furniture vouchers. In a week, we did an apartment-painting party, and I got him a puppy, because he had no one here in this country,” recalled Martínez.

She happily reports that the young man is finished with school and works as an advocate for others infected with HIV.

“He’s touching a lot of people’s lives. He’s helped over 240 families. My goal is to change something for someone who can change something for another person,” she said. “It’s the gift that keeps on giving.”

A force of nature herself, Martínez compares her goals to another natural phenomenon.

“You know when you’re walking in the rain, you won’t notice individual drops unless one lands in your eye? Well, I want to be the drop that lands in your eye,” she observed. “You remember that rain drop, and you pay attention to it.”

With the grant money from her award, Martínez hopes to open a center in the South Bronx, similar to Hetrick-Martin.  She is acutely aware of the need for a similar place in the South Bronx.

As of now, the only thing she is unsure on is what to name it.

But she has some ideas.

“Maybe something like ‘Beba’s House,’ because it sounds like you’re going to a friend’s house.”

Interested in collaborating with Sherise Martínez to create a youth center in the South Bronx? Please send her an e-mail her at TheRaindropProject@gmail.com.

 

Una madre como ninguna otra

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

En Acacia, ella trabaja para empoderar a los jóvenes y de apoyo. "Mi objetivo es cambiar algo para alguien que pueda cambiar algo por otra persona", explica.

En Acacia, ella trabaja para empoderar a los jóvenes y de apoyo. “Mi objetivo es cambiar algo para alguien que pueda cambiar algo por otra persona”, explica.

Grandes madres a menudo son consideradas héroes anónimos.

Pero la residente del Bronx Sherise Martínez tuvo su oportunidad en el centro de atención cuando recientemente la joven madre fue honrada en la Primera Gala Anual de
Premios a Madres Latinas.

La Gala, celebrada el mes pasado en colaboración con la Federación Hispana, rinde homenaje a las madres latinas que han demostrado ser capaces en su trabajo como personas que cuidan como lo han hecho tomando retos específicos.

Como premio a su dedicación a sus familias y comunidades, cada una de las premiadas recibieron $5,000.

Los fondos serán utilizados para la causa de la comunidad seleccionada por la ganadora.

Los compañeros de Martínez en The Acacia Network Casa Promesa, donde ella es consejera para adolescentes con HIV positivo y aquellos recuperándose de abuso con substancias, la animaron a aplicar para el premio en julio.

Estaba indecisa.

“Acabo de ser madre”, explicó ella. “Mi hija tiene solo 14 meses”.

Sin embargo, la misma maternidad es la que la obliga a su trabajo.

El largo llamado de servicio de Martínez ha sido reforzado por el deseo de hacer el mundo uno mejor para su hija.

“Fui bendecida cuando mi hija llegó a mi vida. Me dio una perspectiva realmente diferente para ver el mundo”, dijo ella.

Martínez detalló sus pensamientos: “cuando ella está afuera en el mundo, pregunto ¿Qué puedo hacer para crear un mejor mundo para ella? ¿Qué puedo hacer para crear cambios positivos para algunas de las personas con las que va a tener que interactuar luego en su vida?”.

Aun antes de la maternidad, Martínez ha estado en una misión de vida para ayudar a otros.

Martínez está buscando crear un centro de jóvenes para jóvenes desconectados en el Sur del Bronx.

Martínez está buscando crear un centro de jóvenes para jóvenes desconectados en el Sur del Bronx.

A la edad de 14, fue voluntaria del Instituto The Hetrick-Martin, una organización en West Village que provee un lugar seguro para las lesbianas, homosexuales, bisexuales, transgéneros (LGBT), quienes a menudo son expulsados de sus familias y hogares.

Ahí, los jóvenes LGBT se hacen sentir cómodos de una manera que algunos nunca se han sentido en cualquier otro lugar. Hay un centro de poesía, un lounge con juegos y se le da la bienvenida a todo el mundo. Los empleados y visitantes hacen la cena juntos y todo el mundo se une para compartir las comidas. “Fue bueno, porque se sintió como unidad familiar”, recordó Martínez de su tiempo ahí como voluntaria.

En la noche, Martínez y otros voluntarios hacían alcance nocturno, entrando a una camioneta para encontrar adolescentes tirados a su suerte y en la calle. Distribuían condones y alimento, animándolos a venir al centro y estar fuera de las calles.

La cálida aura de Martinez y su persistente sonrisa hacen fácil la comunicación, una bendición para alguien que ha dedicado su vida del trabajo para ayudar a otros.

Pero no es solo amabilidad lo que la hace se ganar la confianza del paciente; es el conocimiento de primera mano que le ha dado la sabiduría más allá de sus años.

Cuando adolescente, ella fue recibida con hostilidad cuando dijo que era lesbiana.

En lugar de amargarse, se convirtió en defensora y fue a Hetrick-Martin a ayudar a otros.

A la edad de 17, Martínez se enlistó en la Marina de los E.U. luego del 9/11, y fue parte de la fuerza hasta el año pasado.

Ella abiertamente describe los pasados dos años como los momentos más difíciles en su vida.

Aunque Martínez inequívocamente considera su hija una bendición, las circunstancias de su embarazo no lo fueron.

Su embarazo fue más que no planificado; Martínez fue violada.

Martínez no habla de los detalles y solo señala que el tener una hija ha cambiado su vida.

“Mi corazón ya no está en mi pecho, mi corazón está con mi hija donde quiera que ella pueda estar”, explicó ella. “Ella es mi vida”.

No hay bordes en su discurso o afecto, poco sentido del dolor que la ha visitado repetidamente.

En su lugar, Martínez irradia luz.

Su hija es una motivación: “Ella es mi vida”.

Su hija es una motivación: “Ella es mi vida”.

Como sus compañeros de trabajo han señalado, tiene reservas ilimitadas de compasión para sus clientes. “Ir a trabajar es la energía para ‘go-cart’”, sonríe. “Ves los cambios que comienzan a suceder. Esas son las cosas que levantan tu espíritu cuando tu no solo estas preocupada por ti”. Muchos de los adolescentes víctimas de abuso de substancias y HIV vienen a ella sin seguro médico, apoyo de la familia y más importante, esperanza. Muchos tienen padres que también abusan de substancias.

Como consejera, Martínez sirve como una hermana mayor, porrista y mentora para sus pacientes. A menudo es la única persona que conocen que ha tenido experiencia más allá de la línea de pobreza y a la cual le pueden hablar sobre aplicaciones para el colegio, ayuda financiera y conseguir un empleo.

“Muchas veces estos niños no tienen a alguien para decirle, ‘yo he estado ahí, yo se lo que se siente’”.

Martínez sabe que no puedes cambiar la vida de alguien de la noche a la mañana, pero uno de sus mejores hazañas es cambiar la vida de alguien en 72 horas.

Uno de sus clientes era un joven HIV positivo quien había sido expulsado de la Universidad Estatal de Nueva York en New Paltz, donde había recibido una beca completa. La beca lo había llevado de la República Dominicana a la parte norte de Nueva York, en lo que hubiera sido la oportunidad de su sueño de convertirse en diseñador.

En un aparente cambio de fortuna, el estudiante fue diagnosticado con HIV.

Al no poder costearse una vivienda alterna, el estudiante fue expulsado por poner en peligro a otros estudiantes en el recinto. El joven llegó a Casa Promesa sin dinero, sin seguro, sin visa y muy poca esperanza.

Entonces conoció a Martínez.

“En 72 horas, pude conseguirle vivienda y boletos para muebles. En una semana, hicimos una fiesta para pintar el apartamento, y le conseguí un cachorro, porque el no tiene a nadie aquí en este país”, recordó Martínez.

Sherise Martínez, de Acacia Network, recientemente fue reconocida en la Primera Gala Anual de los Premios a Madres Latinas.

Sherise Martínez, de Acacia Network, recientemente fue reconocida en la Primera Gala Anual de los Premios a Madres Latinas.

Reporta felizmente que el joven terminó la escuela y trabaja como defensor para otros infectados con HIV.

“El ha tocado la vida de muchas personas. Ha ayudado a más de 240 familias. Mi meta es cambiar algo para alguien que pueda cambiar algo para otra persona”, dijo ella. “Es el regalo que sigue dando”.

Una fuerza de la misma naturaleza, Martínez compara sus metas con otro fenómeno natural. “¿Sabes cuando estas caminando en la lluvia, no te das cuenta de las gotas individuales hasta que una aterriza en tu ojo? Bueno, deseo ser la gota que aterriza en tu ojo”, observó ella. “Tu recuerdas esa gota de lluvia y le prestas atención”.

Con el dinero de su premio, Martínez espera abrir un centro en el Sur del Bronx similar a Hetrick-Martin. Ella está conciente de la necesidad de un lugar similar en el Sur del Bronx.

Hasta ahora, de lo único que no está segura es del nombre.

Pero tiene algunas ideas.

“A lo mejor algo como “Beba’s House’, porque suena como si fueras a la casa de un amigo”.

¿Interesados en colaborar con Sherise Martínez para crear un centro de jóvenes en el Sur del Bronx? Favor de enviarle un correo electrónico a TheRaindropProject@gmail.com.