LocalNews

A link and a prayer
Un enlace y una oración

The Clergy Roundtable gets connected

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer



In 1965, the landmark legislation of the Voting Rights Act was passed.

The years-long efforts – and ultimate passage of the Act – were the direct result of the collaboration forged between legislators, activists, students, and clergy.

Including one Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.

“The clergy has always played a key role, from the civil rights in the 60’s to activism for immigration reform now,” said Jonathan Soto, the Chair of the Clergy Roundtable’s steering committee and the Chair of the Bronx Long-term Recovery Group. “We have a civil rights ethos that allows us to shape and mold policy, and in times of budgetary wrangling, we can infuse a moral imperative.”

The Bronx Clergy Roundtable hosted its monthly meeting.
The Bronx Clergy Roundtable hosted its monthly meeting.

The Clergy Roundtable, a collection of approximately 40 groups with missions that range from religious to civic, was started about two years ago to provide a base for activism efforts in the borough.

This past Tues., July 9th, the Clergy Roundtable hosted its monthly meeting with the Bronx Long-Term Recovery Group on East Gun Hill Road.

The Recovery Group was founded in April to help prepare local residents for emergency situations.

Participants at the meeting included the The Salvation Army; Bronx Health Reach; Children’s Defense Fund and Idealist.org.

“You have concerned citizens who are worried about all aspects of the community,” said Reverend Que English, who helped organized the event with Soto.

Members of the clergy and those involved in spiritual and religious work, they argued, are no exception.

“The church should be feeding the spirit and feeding the mind,” said Miguel Santiago, a layperson.

Idealist.com’s founder Ami Dar Ami Dar discussed taking action online.
Idealist.com’s founder Ami Dar Ami Dar discussed taking action online.

The Roundtable has been active since its inception, bringing to fruition a community benefits agreement with the developers of the Kingsbridge Armory, and starting several programs, including a court advocacy program for youth who are going to trial, a mentoring program for youth on probation, and entrepreneurship training for previously incarcerated individuals.

“A lot of people forget about the church, but our clergy is a huge base for uplifting communities,” said Assemblymember Vanessa Gibson, who attended the meeting.

At the meeting, various leaders in groups both clerical and non-profit, presented their platforms to garner support for their causes.

Ami Dar, the founder of Idealist.com, a networking website for activists, volunteers and non-profits, discussed new ways of networking and taking action online. Michael Orfitelli, a disaster services coordinator for the Salvation Army, unveiled a new volunteer project to help senior citizens survive disasters like Hurricane Sandy. Reverend Divine Prior of Brooklyn spoke of the perceived pipeline from classrooms to court to jail as an issue that faced poor communities and communities of color.

None of the secular guests gave a second thought to collaborating with the clergy.

“If you really think about what happens on the ground, it starts with the clergy,” said Marlin Jenkins, the founder of NuLuz Networks Inc., which aims to bring Broadband and Internet service to more people in the Bronx.

Jenkins is also the Vice President of Mid-Bronx Senior Citizens Council.

Another point of focus was the need to galvanize support to counter the Supreme Court’s recent decision to strike down key component of the Voting Rights Act, which was designated to counter the disenfranchisement of the rights of minority voters.

“We have a civil rights ethos that allows us to shape and mold policy,” said Jonathan Soto, Chair of the Clergy Roundtable Steering Committee.
“We have a civil rights ethos that allows us to shape and mold policy,” said Jonathan Soto, Chair of the Clergy Roundtable Steering Committee.

An appearance by Reverend Michael Walrond Jr. of I Corinthians Church in Harlem on Skype underscored the need for technology as an organizing tool – and the zeal those present had at the ready.

“To see so much that we fought for get taken away saddens me, but I’ve learned that every time we fight for justice in this country, we win,” said Reverend Waldron.

He urged the clergy to bring record numbers of marchers to a rally in the nation’s capitol at the Lincoln Memorial on August 24th to protest the Supreme Court’s decision—adding that present-day clergy can rely not only on the grace of God, but the power of social media.

Reverend Que English helped set a goal for the other participants: sending 500 Bronx participants to the rally.

In turn, Reverend Janet Hodge of United Methodist Church has already organized two busses. She also used the meeting as a networking opportunity, and collected four business cards in about as many minutes.

She left the meeting with a solid plan.

“My first step is to invite youth and young adults and invite them to be part of the discussion,” she said.

Others at the meeting were similarly enthused.

“[The Supreme Court decision] is going to set us back, but it’s also going to give us an impetus,” said Santiago.

“I have to send 70 emails in 24 hours,” agreed Soto.

As a woman of many words, Reverend English used just a handful to summarize the day.

“It was phenomenal.”

For more information on the Bronx Clergy Roundtable, please visit www.clergyroundtable.org or call 718.231.1033.

La Mesa Redonda del Clero se conecta

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer



En el 1965 se aprobó la histórica legislación de la Ley de Derechos de los Votantes.

Los muchos años de esfuerzos – y la aprobación de la Ley – fueron el resultado directo de la colaboración que se forjó entre legisladores, activistas, estudiantes y clero. Incluyendo al Reverendo Martin Luther King, Jr.

La Mesa Redonda del Clero celebró su reunión mensual.
La Mesa Redonda del Clero celebró su reunión mensual.

El clero siempre ha desempeñado un papel clave, desde los derechos civiles en el 60 al activismo ahora para la reforma de inmigración”, dijo Jonathan Soto, Presidente del Comité de dirección de la Mesa Redonda del Clero y presidente del Grupo de Recuperación a Largo Plazo del Bronx. “Tenemos una filosofía de los derechos civiles que nos permite moldear y darle forma a la política, y en momentos de disputas presupuestarias, podemos infundir una imperativa moral”.

La Mesa Redonda del Clero, una colección de aproximadamente 40 grupos con misiones que fluctúan desde el servicio religioso y civil, comenzó cerca de dos años atrás para proveer una base para los esfuerzos activistas en el condado.

Este pasado jueves, 9 de julio, la Mesa Redonda del Clero celebró su reunión mensual con el Grupo de Recuperación a Largo Plazo del Bronx en ‘East Gun Hill Road’.

El Grupo de Recuperación fue fundado en abril para ayudar a preparar a los residentes locales para situaciones de emergencia.

Ami Dar, fundador de Idealist.com, discutió nueva maneras de tomar acción ‘online’.
Ami Dar, fundador de Idealist.com, discutió nueva maneras de tomar acción ‘online’.

Los participantes en la reunión incluyeron el Ejercito de Salvación; el ‘Bronx Health Reach’; Fondos de Defensa para Niños y Idealist.org.

“Tienes ciudadanos preocupados acerca de todos los aspectos de la comunidad”, dijo la Reverenda Que English, quien ayudó a organizar el evento con Soto.

Miembros del clero y aquellos envueltos en trabajos espirituales y religiosos, argumentaron, no son la excepción.

“La iglesia debería de estar alimentando el espíritu y alimentando la mente”, dijo Miguel Santiago, un laico.

La Mesa Redonda ha estado activa desde sus inicios, llevando a fruición un acuerdo de beneficios comunales con los desarrolladores de ‘Kingsbridge Armory’, y comenzaron varios programas, incluyendo un programa de defensa en la corte para jóvenes que van para juicio, un programa de mentoría para jóvenes en probatoria y entrenamiento empresarial para individuos previamente encarcelados. “Muchas personas se olvidan de la iglesia, pero nuestro clero es una gran base para levantar comunidades”, dijo la Asambleísta Vanessa Gibson, quien asistió a la reunión.

En la reunión, varios líderes de grupos, tanto del clero como sin fines de lucro, presentaron sus plataformas para obtener apoyo para sus causas.

“Nuestro clero es una gran base para alentar comunidades”, dijo la Asambleísta Vanessa Gibson.
“Nuestro clero es una gran base para alentar comunidades”, dijo la Asambleísta Vanessa Gibson.

Ami Dar, fundador de Idealist.com, una página electrónica para activistas, voluntarios y sin fines de lucro, discutió nueva maneras de redes de trabajo y tomar acción ‘online’. Michael Orfitelli, coordinador de servicios de desastre del Ejército de Salvación, dio a conocer un nuevo proyecto de voluntarios para ayudar a ciudadanos de la tercera edad a sobrevivir desastres como el Huracán Sandy. El Reverendo Divine Prior de Brooklyn habló de la percepción de la conexión desde los salones de clases a la corte a la cárcel como un asunto que enfrentan las comunidades pobres y las comunidades de color.

Ninguno de los invitados seculares lo pensó dos veces para colaborar con el clero.

“Si realmente piensas acerca de que sucede en la tierra, comienza con el clero”, dijo Marlin Jenkins, fundadora de NuLuz Networks, Inc., la cual busca llevar servicios de banda ancha y de Internet a más personas en el Bronx.

Jenkins también es vicepresidente del Concejo de Ciudadanos Envejecientes ‘Mid-Bronx’.

Otro punto de interés fue la necesidad de impulsar el apoyo que contrarreste la reciente decisión de la Corte Suprema de abatir el componente clave de la Ley de Derechos Electorales, designada para hacer frente a la privación de los derechos de los votantes de las minorías.

Una presentación del Reverendo Michael Walrond Jr. de la Iglesia ‘Corinthians’ en Harlem por Skipe, subrayó la necesidad de la tecnología como una herramienta organizativa – y el entusiasmo que tenían aquellos presentes.

“El ver tanto por lo que hemos luchado ser arrebatado, me entristece, pero he aprendido que cada vez que luchamos por justicia en este país, ganamos”, dijo el Reverendo Waldron.

El exhorta al clero a llevar un récord de marchantes a la manifestación en la capital de la nación frente al Monumento Lincoln, el 24 de agosto para protestar la decisión de la Corte Suprema – agregando – que hoy en día el clero no puede confiar solo en la gracia de Dios, sino en el poder de los medios de comunicación.

La Reverenda Que English ayudó a fijar una meta para los otros participantes: enviando 500 participantes del Bronx a la manifestación.

“Tenemos una filosofía de los derechos civiles que nos permite moldear y darle forma a la política”, dijo Jonathan Soto, Presidente del Comité de la Mesa Redonda de Cleros.
“Tenemos una filosofía de los derechos civiles que nos permite moldear y darle forma a la política”, dijo Jonathan Soto, Presidente del Comité de la Mesa Redonda de Cleros.

A cambio, la Reverenda Janet Hodge de la Iglesia Metodista Unida ya ha organizado dos autobuses. También utilizó la reunión como una oportunidad de trabajo en red y recogió cuatro tarjetas de representación en pocos minutos.

Dejó la reunión con un plan sólido.

“Mi primer paso es el invitar jóvenes y jóvenes adultos, e invitarlos a ser parte de la discusión”, dijo ella.

Otros en la reunión estuvieron igual de entusiasmados.

“La decisión de la Corte Suprema nos va ha atrasar, pero también nos va a dar un ímpetu”, dijo Santiago.

Soto estuvo de acuerdo, “Tengo que enviar 70 correos electrónicos en 24 horas”.

Como mujer de muchas palabras, la Reverenda English utilizó solo un puñado para resumir el día.

“Fue fenomenal”.

Para mas información sobre La Mesa Redonda del Clero, visite www.clergyroundtable.org o llame al 718.231.1033.

Related Articles

Check Also
Close
Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker