EducationHealthLocalNews

A grin the whole world wide

Llevando sonrisas a todos los rincones

A grin the whole world wide

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


World Smile Day was celebrated at the Harry S. Truman High School.
World Smile Day was celebrated at the Harry S. Truman High School.

Frowns were not allowed.

This past Fri., Oct. 4th was, officially, World Smile Day.

And one of the biggest supplier of smiles, the Smile Train, a non-profit organization that funds surgeries for children born with cleft lips and cleft palates, was present for a celebration at the Harry S. Truman High School Track in Co-op City. In addition to providing hundreds of thousands of cleft surgeries since 1999, Smile Train has provided training to doctors and medical professionals in over 85 countries.

They were joined by a pair of beauties whose careers rely largely on their smiles – and with deep ties to the borough and to the cause.

Smile Train, in collaboration with Project BOOST, a program that provides cultural and academic enrichment to New York City public school students, hosted a day of awareness for cleft lips and cleft palates.

“I remember being in these kids’ places," said model Devyn Abdullah with former step team coach, Rita Henry.
“I remember being in these kids’ places,” said model Devyn Abdullah with former step team coach, Rita Henry.

World Smile Day was created by Harvey Ball, the creator of the smiley face logo in 1963, who believed that every person should devote one day each year to smiles and acts of compassion throughout the world. He created World Smile Day in an effort to revitalize the original meaning of his logo as a symbol of generosity.

Students from Harry S. Truman High School, MS 180, MS 181 and PS 178 all got an opportunity to exercise around the track, eat pizza provided by Famous Famiglia Pizza and see live performances—as well as meet a few celebrities, including Devyn, the winner of Oxygen’s The Face, singer and songwriter Sonali Argade, and Miss New York contestant Saribel Rodríguez.

Bronx-born Rodriguez was born with a cleft palate that was remedied after five surgeries while she was still a baby. Now, at age 21, she is a contestant for Miss New York.

She also won second place in this year’s contest to be the queen of the Hispanic Day Parade.

Rodriguez promises to allocate 10 percent of her Miss New York sponsorship money to the Smile Train should she win.

Paul Kolaj, CEO of Famous Famiglia Pizza, which has donated $10,000 to Smile Train.
Paul Kolaj, CEO of Famous Famiglia Pizza, which has donated $10,000 to Smile Train.

“What better platform to represent than the one you’re born with?” she said

A cleft lip or palate occurs when there is a gap in one’s lip or the roof of one’s mouth. The congenital condition is typically remedied with a relatively inexpensive and non-invasive surgery that can sometimes leave a slight scar as the only reminder of the condition. The surgery costs, on average, $250. But many people in developing nations cannot afford the surgery.

Many people with cleft lips or cleft palates are teased and sometimes ostracized.

Rodriguez would know.

“There was always bullying,” she recalled. “But I never let it get to me. I grew up very confident. That helped me out through life.”

Eliza Pérez, a 9th grader at Harry S. Truman High School, was also born with a cleft palate—and an air of confidence, said her media teacher, Dave Roush.

Saribel Rodríguez, a 2014 Miss New York contestant, was born with a cleft palate.
Saribel Rodríguez, a 2014 Miss New York contestant, was born with a cleft palate.

“Eliza came into my class this year, and she has an energy and a brightness—her energy glows wherever she goes,” he said of his student.

Pérez’s smile was on full display on Friday. She said she refuses to see her cleft palate as a burden.

“I know it’s not easy being born with it, but it’s special—not every has one,” she said.

She too has learned that not everyone views her condition as a special quality.

“They don’t understand us,” she said. “They laugh at us because we’re different.”

But she is not alone in persisting on the positive. Roush seeks to cultivate a culture of positivity in the classroom.

“No matter what you look like or what you sound like we judge you on your character,” he said.

One out of every 700 live births in the United States results in a cleft lip or palate, according to Susannah Schaefer, the Vice Chair of Smile Train’s Board of Directors and the charity’s Chief Executive Officer.

“Children [with cleft paltes] can’t eat properly or speak properly,” said Susannah Schaefer, the Smile Train’s Chief Executive Officer.
“Children [with cleft paltes] can’t eat properly or speak properly,” said Susannah Schaefer, the Smile Train’s Chief Executive Officer.
In the developing world, one out of every thousand live births yields an infant with a cleft palate or cleft lip.

While not life-threatening, a cleft lip or palate can prove more than just an aesthetic concern. It can be debilitating.

“Yes, it’s a facial deformity, but it’s so much more. Children can’t eat properly or speak properly,” said Schaefer.

Also, those with cleft palates can be ostracized, and are less likely to go to school or be gainfully employed. Growing up with a cleft palate in a developing country like India, which has 39,300 cleft births per year, and where 32.7 percent of the population is living below the poverty line, adds an additional hurdle.

On World Smile Day, Schaefer said she had much reason to beam.

“It’s kids helping kids. It doesn’t get any better than that,” she said.

Rita Henry, who is the Parent Coordinator at MS 180 as well as the school’s Project BOOST Director, the President of the MS 180 community team and the Head Step Team Coach, couldn’t agree more.

Henry helped the students organize a talent show last year that resulted in raising $3,500 for the Smile Train. It was the students, said Henry, who decided to help support the millions of other children in the world who have cleft lips and palates after learning about the condition during their Project BOOST classes.

Ninth grader Eliza Pérez was born with a cleft palate—and confidence, according to her teacher Dave Roush (right).
Ninth grader Eliza Pérez was born with a cleft palate—and confidence, according to her teacher Dave Roush (right).

“They say, ‘Miss Rita, we are so blessed, we want to help others’,” she said.

“A lot of kids can’t go to school because of their cleft palate,” she added.

The MS 180 step team also added smiles to the day as they performed.

One former member of the step team was present that day: Devyn Abdullah, the winner of Oxygen’s modeling competition The Face. Abdullah, known largely by her first name alone, was more than a guest. She was an alumnus of MS 180.

And she used to be on the step team coached by Henry.

“I remember being in these kids’ places,” she said. “I know everyone here—I’m supporting, but I’m at home.”

While Friday’s event was the first she’d done together with Smile Train, she said she would be attending more events and making donations.

“I just love supporting anything that has to do with changing people’s lives. I’m a mother of a two-year-old, so that’s where my heart is at.”

It made simple sense to Devyn.

“If you can spend $250 on a 40-minute surgery that will change someone’s life, why not?”

For more on The Smile Train, please visit www.smiletrain.org.

Llevando sonrisas a todos los rincones

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


World Smile Day was celebrated at the Harry S. Truman High School.
El Día Mundial de la Sonrisa fue celebrado en el ‘Harry S. Truman High School’.

No se permitían ceños fruncidos.

El pasado viernes 4 de octubre fue oficialmente el Día Mundial de la Sonrisa.

Y uno de los mayores proveedores de sonrisas, Smile Train, una organización sin fines de lucro que financia cirugías para niños que nacen con labio leporino y paladar hendido, estuvo presente para una celebración en la pista de la Escuela Secundaria Harry S. Truman en Co-op City . Además de ofrecer cientos de miles de cirugías desde 1999, Smile Train ha proporcionado capacitación a médicos y profesionales de la medicina en más de 85 países.

Se les unieron un par de bellezas cuyas carreras dependen en gran medida de sus sonrisas, y con profundos vínculos con el condado y la causa.

“I remember being in these kids’ places," said model Devyn Abdullah with former step team coach, Rita Henry.
“Recuerdo estar en el lugar de estos niños”, dijo la modelo Devyn Abdullah con su antigua coordinadora del equipo step, Rita Henry.

Smile Train, en colaboración con proyecto BOOST, un programa que proporciona enriquecimiento cultural y académico a estudiantes de escuelas públicas de la ciudad de Nueva York, organizó una jornada de sensibilización para el labio leporino y paladar hendido.

El Día Mundial Sonrisa fue creado por Harvey Ball, el creador del logo cara sonriente en el año 1963, que creía que cada persona debe dedicar un día al año a las sonrisas y los actos de compasión en el mundo entero. Él creó el Día Mundial de la Sonrisa en un esfuerzo por revitalizar el sentido original de su logotipo como símbolo de la generosidad.

Los estudiantes de la secundaria Harry S. Truman, MS 180, MS 181 y PS 178 todos tuvieron la oportunidad de ejercitarse alrededor de la pista, comer pizza proporcionada por Famous Famiglia Pizza y ver actuaciones en vivo, así como conocer a algunas celebridades, como Devyn, ganador de Oxygen de The Face, la cantante y compositora Sonali Argade, y la concursante de Miss Nueva York, Saribel Rodríguez.

Paul Kolaj, fundador del Famous Famiglia Pizza, que ha donado $10,000 a Smile Train.
Paul Kolaj, fundador del Famous Famiglia Pizza, que ha donado $10,000 a Smile Train.

Originaria del Bronx, Rodríguez nació con un paladar hendido que fue subsanado tras cinco cirugías cuando aún era un bebé. Ahora, a los 21 años, ella es una concursante de Miss Nueva York. Ella también ganó el segundo lugar en el concurso de este año para ser la reina del Desfile de la Hispanidad.

Rodríguez se comprometió a destinar el 10 por ciento de su dinero de patrocinio de Miss Nueva York a Smile Train en caso de ganar.

“¿Qué mejor plataforma para representar que eso con lo que naces?”, dijo.

El labio leporino o paladar hendido se presenta cuando existe una brecha en el labio o el techo de la boca. La condición congénita típicamente se remedia con una cirugía relativamente barata y no invasiva que a veces puede dejar una ligera cicatriz como el único recordatorio de la condición. Los costos de la cirugía son en promedio de $250 dólares, sin embargo, muchas personas en los países en desarrollo no pueden pagarlo.

Muchas personas con labio leporino o paladar hendido son objeto de burla y en ocasiones condenados al ostracismo.

Saribel Rodríguez, a 2014 Miss New York contestant, was born with a cleft palate.
Saribel Rodríguez, concursante de Miss New York 2014, nació con paladar hendido.

Rodríguez lo sabría.

“Siempre ha habido bullying”, recordó. “Pero nunca dejé que me afectara. Crecí con mucha confianza. Eso me ayudó a vivir”.

Eliza Pérez, de noveno grado en la escuela secundaria Harry S. Truman, también nació con paladar hendido y un aire de confianza, dijo su maestro de medios, Dave Roush.

“Eliza entró en mi clase este año, tiene una energía y un brillo que brilla donde quiera que va”, dijo de su estudiante.

La sonrisa de Pérez estuvo en plena exhibición el viernes. Ella dijo que ella se niega a ver su paladar como una carga.

“Sé que no es fácil nacer con él, pero es especial-no todos tienen uno”, dijo.

Ella también ha aprendido que no todo el mundo ve su condición como una cualidad especial.

“Ellos no nos entienden”, dijo. “Se ríen de nosotros porque somos diferentes”.

Pero ella no es la única que persiste en lo positivo. Roush busca cultivar una cultura de positivismo en el aula.

“No importa cómo te ves o lo que suena si nosotros juzgáramos a tu personaje”, dijo.

Los niños no pueden comer adecuadamente o hablar correctamente ", dijo Susannah Schaefer, directora general de la organización.
Los niños no pueden comer adecuadamente o hablar correctamente “, dijo Susannah Schaefer, directora general de la organización.

Uno de cada 700 nacimientos vivos en los Estados Unidos resulta en un labio leporino o paladar hendido, según Susannah Schaefer, la Vice Presidente de la Junta Directiva de Smile Train y directora general de la organización.

En el mundo en desarrollo, uno de cada mil nacimientos arroja un bebé con paladar hendido o labio leporino.

Si bien no es mortal, un labio leporino o paladar hendido pueden ser más que una simple preocupación estética. Puede ser debilitante.

“Sí, es una deformidad facial, pero es mucho más. Los niños no pueden comer adecuadamente o hablar correctamente “, dijo Schaefer.

También, aquellos con paladar hendido sufren ostracismo, y son menos propensos a ir a la escuela o a tener un empleo remunerado. Crecer con un paladar hendido en un país en desarrollo como la India, que cuenta con 39,300 nacimientos hendido por año, y donde 32.7 por ciento de la población vive por debajo del umbral de pobreza, añade un obstáculo adicional.

En el Día Mundial de la Sonrisa, Schaefer dijo que tenía mucha razón de sonreír.

“Son niños ayudando a los niños. No hay nada mejor que eso”, dijo.

Rita Henry, quien es la coordinadora de padres de MS 180, así como Directora del Proyecto BOOST de la escuela, la presidenta del equipo de la comunidad MS 180 y la cabeza de Step Team Coach, no podía estar más de acuerdo.

Henry ayudó a los estudiantes a organizar un concurso de talentos el año pasado que dio lugar a la recaudación de $3,500 dólares para Smile Train. Fueron los estudiantes, dijo Henry, quienes decidieron ayudar a los millones de niños en el mundo que tienen labio leporino y paladar hendido después de enterarse de la condición durante sus clases del proyecto BOOST.

Ninth grader Eliza Pérez was born with a cleft palate—and confidence, according to her teacher Dave Roush (right).
Eliza Pérez, de noveno grado, nació con paladar hendido y con un aire de confianza, de acuerdo con su maestro de medios, Dave Roush.

“Ellos dicen, ‘Señorita Rita, estamos tan bendecidos, queremos ayudar a los demás'”, dijo.

“Muchos de los niños no pueden ir a la escuela debido a su paladar”, agregó.

El equipo Step de MS 180 también agregó sonrisas al día.

Una antigua integrante del equipo Step estuvo presente ese día: Devyn Abdullah, la ganadora del concurso de modelos del programa The Face de Oxygen. Abdullah, conocida principalmente por su primer nombre solamente, era más que una invitada. Fue una alumna de MS 180.

Y ella solía estar en el equipo Step dirigido por Henry.

“Recuerdo estar en el lugar de estos niños”, dijo. “Yo conozco a todos aquí, estoy apoyando pero estoy en casa.”

Mientras que el evento del viernes fue el primero que había hecho junto a Smile Train, dijo que iba a asistir a más eventos y a hacer donaciones.

“Me encanta apoyar cualquier cosa que tenga que ver con el cambio de vida de las personas. Soy madre de un niño de dos años de edad, de modo que es donde mi corazón está”.

Es sentido común para Devyn.

“Si usted puede gastar $250 dólares en una cirugía de 40 minutos que va a cambiar la vida de alguien, ¿por qué no lo haría?”.

Para mas sobre The Smile Train, favor visite www.smiletrain.org.

Related Articles

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker