A Call-In to drive change

Haciendo un llamado para el cambio

Haciendo un llamado para el cambio

  • English
  • Español

A Call-In to drive change

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

CUNY’s Citizenship Now! Call-In has been held for over a decade.

CUNY’s Citizenship Now! Call-In has been held for over a decade.

Ana García-Reyes is usually seen out and about on Hostos Community College, where she works as the Director of International Programs and Special Assistant for Community Relations.

But Wed., Apr. 24th found her at another City University of New York (CUNY) campus – at The New Community College, where CUNY’S 11th Annual Citizenship Now! Call-in was being held.

The current national discussion on immigration reform helped compel her to volunteer her time.

“Immigration reform is needed, and it helps us all,” she explained. “When people become citizens, everyone wins. Look at all this human capital throughout the states.”

There are estimated to be over 1 million undocumented immigrants who are potential employees, students, and tax-payers. There are millions more documented immigrants who aspire to become citizens.

Since 2004, the annual CUNY/ Daily News Citizenship NOW! Call-In has provided over over 100,000 callers with free, confidential information on immigration issues ranging from U.S. citizenship to residency to family petitions. Hundreds of volunteers participate in this event each year, many of them trained by CUNY Citizenship Now! lawyers and legal professionals.

CUNY’s Citizenship Now! Director, immigration attorney and professor Allan Wernick.

CUNY’s Citizenship Now! Director, immigration attorney and professor Allan Wernick.

The Call-In was a vision conceived in large part by Jay Hershenson, Senior Vice Chancellor for University Relations for the City University of New York (CUNY), who approached immigration attorney Allan Wernick to organize the event.

Wernick has directed CUNY Citizenship Now! since its founding in 1997.

For one week each spring, phones are opened from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. to take calls from anyone seeking immigration information or resources.

The overall capacity has more than doubled since the event’s kickoff year.

In 2012 alone, over 350 volunteers assisted 12,571 callers in 48 different languages.

Prior to each year’s Call-In, a full-day training session is provided all participants. The training covers the basics of immigration law and familiarizes volunteers with the publications and resources available to them during the week.

During the length of the Call-In, attorneys – identifiable by their sashes – make their rounds to lend assistance.

Carolina Ayala, the Consul of Political and Economic Affairs for the Mexican Consulate, visited for the first time.

Carolina Ayala, the Consul of Political and Economic Affairs for the Mexican Consulate, visited for the first time.

This is the first year García-Reyes has worked the lines, and by late morning, she had conversed with ten callers—including an undocumented man from the Bronx who called to inquire if his legal status would change if he got married to his same-sex partner.

Garcia-Reyes regretfully told him that it wouldn’t.

“I felt a little sad for him. He said he has been with his partner for a number of years.” Lourdes Torres is a grant officer from Hostos Community College. She, too, took the time to volunteer.

“I think it’s especially important to be here this year because immigration reform is on the forefront of the people’s minds and the president’s agenda. Being here helps push it,” she said.

It was well past noon, and Torres had been handling the phones since 9 a.m.

She had already spoken to 70 people. Her passion—and frustration at anti-immigration sentiment that emanated from certain pockets of the country – kept her fueled.

“I don’t know where we got to ‘Don’t let these people in here’,” she said. “That’s got to change. The American Dream has to be available to everyone.”

“Border issues…inspired me to help out,” explained lawyer Andres Lemons.

“Border issues…inspired me to help out,” explained lawyer Andres Lemons.

Andres Lemons is an attorney who lives in Harlem, and sported a scarlet sash to be readily identifiable to any volunteers in need of assistance.

Lemons, who is of Mexican descent, grew up in Arizona, where the Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act was signed into law in 2010. The legislation gives law enforcement the right to stop anyone on the street and inquire about their immigration status. It also makes it illegal to be without identification. While some stipulations of the law were eventually blocked by a federal judge, Lemons’ commitment to advocating for immigrants’ rights has endured.

He has provided training on immigration issues and pro bono services to the immigrant community since 2005.

“I saw a lot of border issues that inspired me to help out,” he said.

 Over 100,000 calls have been fielded since the Call-in’s founding.

Over 100,000 calls have been fielded since the Call-in’s founding.

This is his fifth year volunteering at the Call-In.

“It’s nice for people to know that there’s a place they can go for information.”

The Call-In center and its volunteers received visits from foreign dignitaries, embassy workers and local elected officials.

Carolina Ayala, the Consul of Political and Economic Affairs for the Mexican Consulate, dropped in. It was her first time at the Call-In. Ayala said that she and her colleagues were also tuned in to the national conversation on reform.

“I would say that everyone (at the consulate) is paying attention to it. They’re waiting for the discussion to go further,” she said. “It’s too early to know what’s going to happen.” Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez swung by as well.

Lourdes Torres (left) and Ana García-Reyes (right) of Hostos Community College served as volunteers.

Lourdes Torres (left) and Ana García-Reyes (right) of Hostos Community College served as volunteers.

“I’m thanking them for being good New Yorkers,” he said, as he shook the hands of volunteers. “Some of these volunteers are lawyers who could be earning $500 an hour, but they are [here], taking phone calls.”

Councilmember Rodríguez also shared details on a bill he is working on that would allow green card holders to participate in municipal elections.

It is estimated that there are 750,000 green card holders in New York City.

“It could have a huge impact,” he said.

As he spoke, the numbers scrolling down on a large screen showed the real-time impact the Call-In was having, indicating the number of calls already fielded: 7,000 – and counting.

Although the Call-In is over, CUNY’s Citizenship Now! work continues. For more information on its services, please visit www.cuny.edu/about/resources/citizenship.html.

At a Glance: The 11th Annual Citizenship NOW! Call-in Drive

2013 Call-In: Total number of calls answered

13,311

2012 Call-In: Total number of calls answered

12,571

Total number of calls answered since first Call-In

123,184

Haciendo un llamado para el cambio

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

CUNY’s Citizenship Now! Call-In has been held for over a decade.

El proyecto ‘CUNY’s Citizenship Now! Call-In’ lleva mas de una decada.

Ana García-Reyes normalmente es vista merodeando el Colegio Comunal Hostos, donde trabaja como Directora de Programas Internacionales y Asistente Especial de Relaciones con la Comunidad.

Pero el miércoles, 24 de abril la encontré en otro recinto – el del Nuevo Colegio Comunal de CUNY, donde se celebraba la actividad de llamadas de ‘Citizenship NOW’.

La actual discusión nacional sobre la reforma inmigratoria la obligó a dar su tiempo voluntario.

“La reforma de inmigración se necesita, y nos ayuda a todos,” dijo ella. “Cuando las personas se convierten en ciudadanos, todo el mundo gana. Mire todo este capital humano a través de los estados”.

De hecho, hay más de 11 millones de inmigrantes sin documentos que son empleados potenciales, estudiantes y contribuyentes – sin mencionar las reuniones familiares.

Hay muchos más millones de inmigrantes documentados que aspiran en convertirse en ciudadanos.

Desde el 2004, en el evento anual de llamadas de Ciudadanía de CUNY/Daily News, se la proveído información a más de 100,000 que han llamado para conseguir información gratuita y confidencial en asuntos desde residencia hasta peticiones familiares.

CUNY’s Citizenship Now! Director, immigration attorney and professor Allan Wernick.

El director de ‘CUNY’s Citizenship Now!’ es el abogado y profesor Allan Wernick.

Cientos de voluntarios participan en el evento cada año, muchos entrenados por el proyecto de CUNY.

El evento nace en gran parte de la visión de Jay Hersherson, vice canciller de relaciones universitarias de CUNY. Se acerco a Allan Wernick, abogado de inmigración, para organizar el evento.

Wernick ha dirigido el proyecto en CUNY desde que se fundó en el 1997.

Cada primavera por una semana, de 9 a.m. a 7 p.m., voluntarios contestan las llamadas de los que quieran información y recursos sobre inmigración.

La capacidad se ha doblado desde que el evento comenzó.

En el 2012, más de 350 voluntarios ayudaron a 12,571 personas que llamaron, hablando 48 idiomas.

La actividad depende del apoyo de voluntarios como García-Reyes.

Carolina Ayala, the Consul of Political and Economic Affairs for the Mexican Consulate, visited for the first time.

Carolina Ayala, Cónsul de Asuntos Políticos y Económicos del Consulado Mexicano, visito por primera vez.

Los voluntarios reciben entrenamiento antes de trabajar, y son ayudados por abogados – identificados con un distintivo.

Este es el primer año que ella ha trabajado las líneas, y ya había conversado con diez personas – incluyendo un hombre sin documentos del Bronx quien llamó para preguntar si su estatus legal cambiaría si se casaba con su pareja del mismo sexo.

García-Reyes le dijo que lamentablemente no.

“Me sentí un poco triste por él. Dijo que había estado con su pareja por varios años”.

Lourdes Torres es una oficial de becas del Colegio Comunal Hostos.

También sacó el tiempo para ser voluntaria en la actividad.

“Pienso que es especialmente importante el estar aquí este año porque la reforma inmigratoria está en las mentes de las personas y en la agenda del presidente. El estar aquí ayuda a empujarla”, dijo

Ya era pasado el mediodía y Torres había estado manejando los teléfonos desde las 9 a.m. Ya había hablado con 70 personas.

“Border issues…inspired me to help out,” explained lawyer Andres Lemons.

“Vi muchos asuntos en la frontera que me inspiraron a ayudar”, explico el abogado Andres Lemons.

Su pasión y frustración por el sentimiento anti-inmigración que ha emanado de algunos políticos y ciudadanos de ciertos lugares del país la mantuvieron en acción.

“No se como este sentimiento anti-inmigrante de no dejar a estas personas aquí continúa. Eso tiene que cambiar. El Sueño Americano tiene que estar disponible para todo el mundo”.

Andres Lemons es un abogado que vive en Harlem.

Llevaba una faja escarlata para ser fácilmente identificado por voluntarios con preguntas legales.

Lemons, quien es de descendencia mexicana, creció en Arizona, donde ‘Support Our Law Enforcement’ y ‘Safe Neighborhoods Act’ fue firmado en ley en el 2010. La legislacion les brindo a los oficiales de la ley el derecho de detener a cualquiera en la calle y pedirle su estatus inmigratorio. También hacia ilegal el estar sin identificación. Sin embargo, algunas estipulaciones de la ley fueron bloqueadas por un juez federal.

“Vi muchos asuntos en la frontera que me inspiraron a ayudar”, dijo él.

 Over 100,000 calls have been fielded since the Call-in’s founding.

Más de 100,000 llamadas han sido contestadas desde que se inicio el ‘Call-In’.

Este es su quinto año siendo voluntario.

“Es bueno que las personas sepan que hay un lugar donde pueden ir por información”.

El Centro recibe visitas de dignatarios extranjeros, empleados de la embajada y oficiales electos.

Carolina Ayala, Cónsul de Asuntos Políticos y Económicos del Consulado Mexicano, pasó. Fue su primera vez. A lo mejor su visita, también fue ocasionada por la discusión nacional.

“Diría que todo el mundo en el consulado le está prestando atención. Están esperando que la discusión vaya mucho más allá”, dijo ella. “Es demasiado pronto para saber que va a suceder”.

Lourdes Torres (left) and Ana García-Reyes (right) of Hostos Community College served as volunteers.

Lourdes Torres (izq.) y Ana García-Reyes (der.) del Colegio Comunal Hostos, tomaron el día para ser voluntarias.

El Concejal Ydanis Rodríguez también visitó, y estrechó las manos de todos los voluntarios.

“Les estoy dando las gracias por ser buenos neoyorquinos. Algunos de estos voluntarios son abogados que podrían estar ganando $500 la hora, pero están tomando llamadas telefónicas”.

El Concejal Rodríguez también divulgó su proyecto para permitirles a los poseedores de tarjetas verdes participar en las elecciones municipales. Se estima que hay 750,000 poseedores de tarjetas verdes en la ciudad de Nueva York.

“Podría tener un gran impacto”, dijo.

Los números de llamadas desplegados en una gran pantalla en el salón mostraba el real impacto en tiempo que estaban teniendo los voluntarios: 7,000.

Aunque el ‘Call-In’ ha terminado, el trabajo continúa. Para más información sobre sus servicios, visite por favor www.cuny.edu/about/resources/citizenship.html.

Un Vistazo: El Proyecto ‘Citizenship NOW! Call-in’

El Call-In del 2013: Numéro total de llamadas contestadas

13,311

El Call-In del 2012: Numéro total de llamadas contestadas

12,571

Numéro total de llamadas contestadas desde su inicio

123,184