EducationLocalNews

“A Bronx kid sitting between two princesses”

“Un niño del Bronx sentado entre dos princesas”

“A Bronx kid sitting between two princesses”

Nobel Prize Laureate honored

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


“It was a formative experience for me,” said Nobel Prize Laureate Robert J. Lefkowitz of his alma mater Bronx Science.
“It was a formative experience for me,” said Nobel Prize Laureate Robert J. Lefkowitz of his alma mater Bronx Science.

Björn Lyrvall, the Swedish Ambassador to the United States, is due for a pilgrimage to the Bronx.

While the borough might not yet have retail icons Ikea and H&M, symbols of Sweden’s entrepreneurial footprint on the world, the Bronx nonetheless has not gone unnoticed by the Swedes.

That is because it is home to The Bronx High School of Science (Bronx Science), the high school that has produced the most Nobel Laureate prize winners in the world.

The Nobel Prizes are, of course, the annual international awards awarded by Scandinavian committees in recognition of cultural and scientific advances. The will of the Swedish philanthropist and inventor Alfred Nobel established the prizes in 1895.

No other country has had as many Nobel Prize recipients as the United States since the awards were first presented in 1901. Since then, 332 Americans have had universal recognition of their achievements in physics, chemistry, medicine, literature and for work in peace. And all their names are inscribed on the Nobel Monument, which is the only monument in a City park with the names of living persons inscribed.

The Nobel Monument is inscribed with the names of all the American Nobel Laureates.
The Nobel Monument is inscribed with the names of all the American Nobel Laureates.

Still, so far, no Swedish Ambassador has yet set foot in the high school’s hallowed halls. That may soon change.

“At some point, we need to make that trip,” smiled Ambassador Lyrvall, who noted that Jonas Bronck, the borough’s founder, also hailed from Sweden.

While he has yet to visit, Ambassador Lyrvall was able to chat with at least with one of its alumni, Robert J. Lefkowitz, one of five Americans to win the Nobel Laureate last year.

Lefkowitz was awarded the Nobel Prize for his studies of the G-protein coupled receptors. The discovery of the receptors will help scientists develop better pharmaceuticals.

The Nobel Laureate and the Ambassador, together with New York City Parks Commissioner Veronica M. White, gathered together for the unveiling of the names of the 2012 Nobel Laureate winners this past Mon., Sept. 23rd.

Lefkowitz, a Bronx native born and bred, attended the unveiling at the monument at Theodore Roosevelt Park.

In 1906, Theodore Roosevelt was the first American to win a Nobel Prize, which he was awarded for negotiating the end of the Russo-Japanese War.

Lefkowitz recalled with fondness his childhood in the Bronx, and particularly his time at Bronx Science.

“It was a formative experience for me,” he said.

“We really try to teach our students to inquire, question and create,” said Bronx Science Principal Jean Donahue.
“We really try to teach our students to inquire, question and create,” said Bronx Science Principal Jean Donahue.

Also influential was his family doctor, Joseph Feibusch, who made house calls.

“I wanted to model myself after him,” said Lefkowitz.

It was because of Dr. Feibusch that Lefkowitz decided to enter the medical field, though the Vietnam War also played a role. Lefkowitz wanted to avoid having to fight in a war he didn’t believe in. But the draft was imminent.

“There was very few ways to get out of it,” he said.

Lefkowitz was able to join the physician’s draft, and worked as a research associate for the National Institute of Health (NIH) from 1968 to 19790. In the mid-1980’s, Lefkowitz and colleagues discovered g- protein-coupled receptors.

G protein-coupled receptors are an important consideration when developing pharmaceuticals. 30 to 50 percent of all prescription drugs fit like keys into receptors like the ones Lefkowitz discovered.

Björn Lyrvall, the Swedish Ambassador to the United States, attended.
Björn Lyrvall, the Swedish Ambassador to the United States, attended.

“All drugs have to test receptors. They turn that lock if they fit in correctly, and if they fit, they do good things,” explained Lefkowitz.

Jean Donahue, who has just begun her first year as Principal at Bronx Science, also joined in the celebration came on Monday.

She and Lefkowitz bonded over the fact that they were both alumni of Bronx Science.

Donahue had a few hypotheses as to why it produces so many successful scientists.

“We really try to teach our students to inquire, question and create,” she said.

The school offers a series of electives to that end: a robotics team, a math team, a debate team, an award winning newspaper, among others. The students also engage in independent research programs with scientists throughout the city.

In December, the school hosts a dinner for the school’s science fair participants.

“The Nobel Monument is unique in that it honors intellectual achievement,” said Parks Commissioner Veronica White.
“The Nobel Monument is unique in that it honors intellectual achievement,” said Parks Commissioner Veronica White.

Lefkowitz might have also increased the likelihood of winning a Nobel Prize by attending another vaunted institution: Columbia University.

In all, 75 Nobel Laureates have hailed from Columbia University, Lefkowitz included.

In 1962, he graduated from Columbia College where he studied chemistry; he graduated from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1966.

“The parks of New York City are home to numerous monuments, both large and modest, from commemorative plaques to triumphal arches – but the Nobel Monument in Theodore Roosevelt Park is unique in that it honors intellectual achievement,” said Commissioner White. “We are proud to pay tribute to the five newest American Laureates by adding their names to this grand monument, so that New Yorkers and visitors alike may reflect on their vast contributions to society.”

Lefkowitz now lives in South Carolina and teaches chemistry and biochemistry at Duke University.

The monument, designed by renowned Swedish sculptor Sivert Lindblom, now includes the names of all 332 American Nobel Laureates.
The monument, designed by renowned Swedish sculptor Sivert Lindblom, now includes the names of all 332 American Nobel Laureates.

But he is still a New Yorker, as was distinctly clear when he addressed the crowd, which was filled with family, friends and well-wishers.

“As you can hear, I have never lost my New York accent,” he joked.

He reminisced about his visit to Sweden last year with the other Nobel Laureates, and noted that in that country, the frenzy surrounding the winners parallels that of the Superbowl stateside.

Lefkowitz argued that if the acquisition of knowledge were as valued as touchdowns, the American education system might be in better shape.

In Sweden, he explained, the Laureates’ faces graced the covers of all the most popular publications, and they were feted by the royal family.

“Imagine a kid from the Bronx sitting between two princesses at dinner,” said Lefkowitz.


The American Nobel Laureates of 2012, whose name inscriptions were unveiled on the Nobel Monument, are:

David J. Wineland, Physics
Robert J. Lefkowitz, Chemistry
Brian K. Kobilka, Chemistry
Alvin E. Roth, Economics
Lloyd S. Shapley, Economics

“Un niño del Bronx sentado entre dos princesas”

Honrados Ganadores de los Premios Nobel Laureate

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer


“It was a formative experience for me,” said Nobel Prize Laureate Robert J. Lefkowitz of his alma mater Bronx Science.
“Fue una experiencia formativa para mi”, dijo Robert J. Lefkowitz ganador del Premio Nobel Laureate de su alma Mater ‘Bronx Science’.

Björn Lyrvall, Embajador Sueco en las Naciones Unidas, está listo para una peregrinación al Bronx. Aunque el condado todavía no tiene íconos como Ikea y H&M, símbolos de la huella empresarial sueca en el mundo, sin embargo el Bronx no ha pasado desapercibido para los suecos.

Eso es porque es hogar de la Escuela Superior de Ciencia (Bronx Science), la escuela superior que ha producido la mayor parte de los premios ganadores Nobel Laureate en el mundo. Los Premios Nobel son, por supuesto, los premios internacionales anuales otorgados por comités escandinavos en reconocimiento a los avances culturales y científicos. La voluntad del filantrópico e inventor sueco, Alfred Nobel, estableció los premios en el 1895.

Ningún otro país ha tenido tantos recipientes de Premios Nobel como los Estados Unidos desde que fueron presentados los premios por primera vez en el 1901. Desde entonces, 332 americanos han tenido reconocimiento universal de sus logros en física, química, medicina, literatura y por trabajo en la paz. Y todos sus nombres están inscritos en el Monumento Nobel, el cual es el único monumento en un parque de la ciudad con los nombres de personas vivas inscritas.

The Nobel Monument is inscribed with the names of all the American Nobel Laureates.
El Monumento Nobel está inscrito con los nombres de todos los americanos ganadores del ‘Nobel Laureates’.

Todavía, hasta ahora, ningún Embajador sueco ha podido poner pie en los pasillos de la escuela superior. Eso podría cambiar pronto.

“En algún momento tenemos que hacer ese viaje”, sonrío el Embajador Lyrvall, quien señaló que Jonas Bronck, el fundador del condado, también es de Suecia.

Aunque no ha visitado, el Embajador Lyrvall por lo menos pudo charlar con uno de sus alumnos, Robert J. Lefkowitz, uno de los cinco americanos en ganar el ‘Nobel Laureate’ el año pasado. Lefkowitz fue premiado con el Premio Nobel por sus estudios de los receptores acoplados de la proteína G. El descubrimiento de los receptores ayudará a los científicos a desarrollar mejores productos farmacéuticos.

El ‘Nobel Laureate’ y el Embajador, junto a Veronica M. White, Comisionada de Parques de la ciudad de Nueva York, se unieron para revelar los nombres de los ganadores del ‘Nobel Laureate’ 2012 este pasado lunes, 23 de septiembre.

Lefkowitz, nacido y criado en el Bronx, asistió a la revelación en el monumento en el Parque Theodore Roosevelt.

En el 1906, Theodore Roosevelt fue el primer americano en ganar un Premio Nobel, el cual le fue otorgado por negociar el final de la guerra rusa-japonesa.

Lefkowitz recordó con cariño su niñez en el Bronx, y particularmente su tiempo en el ‘Bronx Science’.

“We really try to teach our students to inquire, question and create,” said Bronx Science Principal Jean Donahue.
“Realmente tratamos de enseñarle a nuestros estudiantes a indagar, preguntar y crear”, dijo Jean Donahue, principal de ‘Bronx Science’.

“Fue una experiencia formativa para mi”, dijo el.

También influyente lo fue su médico de cabecera, Joseph Feibusch, quien hacia visitas a domicilio. “Quería moldearme como el”, dijo Lefkowitz.

Fue debido al Dr. Feibusch que Lefkowitz decidió entrar al campo de la medicina, aunque la Guerra de Vietnam también jugó un papel. Lefkowitz deseaba evitar el tener que luchar en una guerra en la que no creía. Pero el reclutamiento era inminente.

“Existían muy pocas maneras de salirse de ello”, dijo.

Lefkowitz pudo unirse al reclutamiento de médicos y trabajó como investigador asociado para el Instituto de Salud Nacional (NIH, por sus siglas en inglés) del 1968 al 1979. A mediados del 1980, Lefkowitz y sus colegas descubrieron que los receptores acoplados de la proteína G son una importante consideración en el desarrollo de productos farmacéuticos. Del 30 al 50 por ciento de todos los medicamentos recetados encajan como llaves en los receptores como los que Lefkowitz descubrió.

“Todos los medicamentos tienen que probar receptores. Estos viran ese bloqueo si encajan correctamente, y si encajan, hacen cosas buenas”, explicó Lefkowitz.

Jean Donahue, quien recién ha comenzado su primer año como principal de ‘Bronx Science’, también se unió a la celebración del lunes.

Björn Lyrvall, the Swedish Ambassador to the United States, attended.
Björn Lyrvall, Embajador Sueco en los Estados Unidos, asistio.

Ella y Lefkowitz establecieron lazos sobre el hecho de que ambos fueron alumnos del ‘Bronx Science’. Donahue tenia varias hipótesis en cuanto al porque produce tantos exitosos científicos. “Realmente tratamos de enseñar a nuestros estudiantes a indagar, preguntar y crear”, dijo ella.

La escuela ofrece una serie de electivas para esos fines: equipo de robótica, equipo de matemática, un equipo de debate, un galardonado periódico, entre otros. Los estudiantes también participan en programas de investigación independientes con científicos a través de la ciudad.

En diciembre, la escuela auspició una cena para los participantes de la feria de ciencia de la escuela.

Lefkowitz podría haber aumentado la probabilidad de ganar un Premio Nobel asistiendo a otra galardonada institución: la Universidad Columbia.

En total, 75 ‘Nobel Laureates’ han venido de la Universidad Columbia, Lefkowitz incluido.

En el 1962, se gradúo de la Universidad Columbia donde estudio química; se gradúo del Colegio de Médicos y Cirujanos de la Universidad Columbia en el 1966.

The monument, designed by renowned Swedish sculptor Sivert Lindblom, now includes the names of all 332 American Nobel Laureates.
El monumento, diseñado por el renombrado escultor sueco Sivert Lindblon, ahora incluye los nombres de todos los 332 americanos ganadores del ‘Nobel Laureate’.

“Los parques de la ciudad de Nueva York son hogar de numerosos monumentos, tanto grandes como modestos, desde placas conmemorativas hasta triunfales arcos – pero el Monumento Nobel en el Parque Theodore Roosevelt es el único que honra el logro intelectual”, dijo la Comisionada White. “Estamos orgullosos de rendir tributo a los cinco nuevos ‘American Laureates’ añadiendo sus nombres a este gran monumento, para que así los neoyorquinos y también los visitantes puedan reflejarse en sus vastas contribuciones a la sociedad”.

Lefkowitz ahora vive en Carolina del Sur y enseña química y bioquímica en la Universidad Duke.

Pero sigue siendo un neoyorquino, como era claradamente evidente cuando se dirigió a la multitud, la cual estaba llena de familiares, amigos y simpatizantes.

“Como puede escuchar, nunca he perdido mi acento neoyorquino”, bromeó.

Recordó acerca de su visita a Suecia el año pasado con los otros ‘Nobel Laureates’ y señaló que en ese país, el frenesí que rodea a los ganadores iguala la del ‘Superbowl’.

Lefkowitz argumentó que si la adquisición de conocimiento fuera tan valiosa como los ‘touchdowns’, el sistema educativo americano podría estar en mejor estado.

En Suecia, explicó, las caras de los ‘Laureates’ adornan las cubiertas de las publicaciones más populares, y son agasajados por la familia real.

“Imagínese un niño del Bronx sentado entre dos princesas en una cena”, dijo Lefkowitz.


Los ‘American Nobel Laureates’ del 2012, cuyos nombres inscritos fueron revelados en el Monumento Nobel son:

David J. Wineland, Física
Robert J. Lefkowitz, Química
Brian K. Kobilka, Química
Alvin E. Roth, Economía
Lloyd S. Shapley, Economía

Related Articles

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker