A Big Gulp
Un gran trago

  • English
  • Español

A Big Gulp: Moving away from the sugary drinks

Story and photos by Sandra E. García

Mayor Michael Bloomberg stands flanked by Public Advocate Bill De Blasio (left) and Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer (right) during a visit to Montefiore Medical Center, where he explained plans to significantly lower obesity rates.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg stands flanked by Public Advocate Bill De Blasio (left) and Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer (right) during a visit to Montefiore Medical Center, where he explained plans to significantly lower obesity rates.

Getting people on board with giving up their super-sized drinks has proven a challenge for Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who recently proposed a city-wide ban on sugary drinks over 16 ounces in city restaurants, movie theaters, and stadiums.

Some polls, such as a recent NY1-Marist poll, reported that over half of the New York City residents surveyed believed the Mayor’s proposal was not a good idea, while 42 percent said they supported it.

Other responses have ranged from mocking, with ads blasting the Mayor that depict him as an older nanny, to laudatory, with health and medical professionals lining up to offer support against sugary drinks they say can add, cumulatively, to a nutritiously deficient diet, obesity, and diabetes.

In an effort to point up the benefits of his proposed ban, Mayor Bloomberg visited Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx – a county that has been rated as the least health in the state.

“58% of New Yorkers citywide are overweight or obese. In the Bronx, it is 70%. That is 630,000 Bronx residents who are at greater risk for developing a host of diseases,” said Mayor Michael Bloomberg on Tues., June 5th in the lobby at the Montefiore Medical Center.

The mayor was joined by Pubic Advocate Bill de Blasio, and Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, as well as Montefiore Hospital President and CEO Dr. Steven M. Safyer, and other community leaders who expressed their support for the proposed ban.

Dr. Steven M. Safyer, President and CEO of Montefiore Medical Center, stands in support of the ban. “This is the beginning,” he said.

Dr. Steven M. Safyer, President and CEO of Montefiore Medical Center, stands in support of the ban. “This is the beginning,” he said.

Mayor Bloomberg argued that the ban would help regulate choices for children, who are also suffering higher rates of disease at earlier ages.

“Obesity doesn’t just affect adults. Among New York City public school students, nearly 40% are overweight or obese,” said Mayor Bloomberg. “Tragically, each of these students face a greater risk of early death. In fact, obesity is the second leading cause, just after smoking of preventable deaths in our city.”

“Every child is attracted to that maximum opportunity for sugar,” said Public Advocate De Blasio. “The business dynamics actually make it a lot harder for parents to do their jobs. The bottom line is parents in this city need all the help they can get weaning these kids from these drinks.”

“One soda per day adds up to 50 pounds of sugar in a year,” said Manhattan Borough President Stringer. “New Yorkers have to understand that this fight is a fight for our children. It’s a fight to make sure that New York is beginning to become the healthiest city in the world.”

And others, across the country, seem to be heeding notice.

The same Tuesday morning, Disney Parks issued a statement that it would no longer sell sugary drinks larger than 16 ounces in its parks.

“We view this ban as something helpful to our members,” said President and Chief Executive Officer Pat Wang, speaking of the proposed ban on large sugary drinks. “The kids are not making choices. They are just taking what is in front of them.”

“We view this ban as something helpful to our members,” said President and Chief Executive Officer Pat Wang, speaking of the proposed ban on large sugary drinks. “The kids are not making choices. They are just taking what is in front of them.”

And First Lady Michelle Obama, who has made a campaign against childhood obesity a touchstone of her time in the White House, also lauded the Mayor Bloomberg for the ban, saying she “applauded anyone who’s stepping up to think about what changes work in their communities.”

The effects of the spike in obesity are demonstrable, according to the City’s Health Department.

One in three New Yorkers now either has diabetes or a condition known as pre-diabetes, a condition where blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be considered diabetes.

Montefiore, as the largest healthcare provider and employer in the Bronx, sees a tremendous number of patients that are battling diseases engendered by obesity.

“We see this ban as a huge deal,” said Dr. Safyer. “The reason we are so enthusiastic about it is because it’s the first step down a pathway that can change how people behave.”

“The size matters. There is more calories in a larger size,” he added, “and the simple implementation and approach to get smaller cups gets people to think.”

Montefiore has also sought to be independently responsive to higher rates of obesity among Bronx residents.

The organization has founded programs such as B’N Fit, a weight loss program for obese teens. It has pulled sugary drinks and fried food from all of their 131 sites throughout the Bronx and provides Zumba classes to 18,000 associates and community members.

Alan D. Aviles, President and Chief Executive Officer of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), the largest municipal healthcare system in the nation, was also present. “[Obesity] is highly correlated with a literal tsunami of chronic disease that we see everyday in our hospitals and health centers.”

Alan D. Aviles, President and Chief Executive Officer of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), the largest municipal healthcare system in the nation, was also present. “[Obesity] is highly correlated with a literal tsunami of chronic disease that we see everyday in our hospitals and health centers.”

Healthfirst, the not-for-profit managed care organization, also expressed its support for the ban.

“I think that we view this ban as something helpful to our members,” said President and Chief Executive Officer Pat Wang, standing in Montefiore’s Moses Campus Atrium. “By the time you need medical care, it is already too late. The kids are not making choices. They are just taking what is in front of them.”

The administration argues that this is also an economic battle.

It estimates that the costs of battling obesity-related disease run the city $4 billion a year.

It is part of Mayor Bloomberg’s goal is to reduce the percent of obese adults by 10% and children by 15% over the next five years.

What others view as ambitious, Montefiore’s chief Dr. Safyer sees as the first step in the right direction.

“This is only a part of a whole array of things that we need to do,” said Dr. Safyer. “This is the beginning. It is education, prevention, guidance, school partnership, working with families, but this is definitely step one.”

Un gran trago; distanciándose de las bebidas azucaradas

Historia y fotos por Sandra E. García

El Alcalde Bloomberg se encuentra acompañado por el Defensor Público Bill De Blasio y el presidente del Condado de Manhattan Scott Stringer en el transcurso de una visita a Montefiore Medical Center, donde explicó que tiene planeado reducir de manera significativa las tasas de obesidad.

El Alcalde Bloomberg se encuentra acompañado por el Defensor Público Bill De Blasio y el presidente del Condado de Manhattan Scott Stringer en el transcurso de una visita a Montefiore Medical Center, donde explicó que tiene planeado reducir de manera significativa las tasas de obesidad.

Lograr que la gente se integre a ceder sus bebidas súper grandes ha demostrado ser un reto para el  Alcalde Michael  Bloomberg, quien recientemente propuso que las bebidas azucaradas de más de 16 onzas en los restaurantes, salas de cine y estadios de la ciudad fueran ilegales.

Algunas encuestas, tales como la reciente Marist-Poll de NY1, reportó que más de la mitad de los residentes de la Ciudad de Nueva York entrevistados consideraron que la propuesta del Alcalde no es buena idea, mientras que el 42 por ciento dijo que la respaldan.

Otras respuestas han variado desde el burlarse, con anuncios arremetiendo contra el Alcalde, mostrándolo como una vieja nana, a elogios de profesionales de la salud y médicos alistándose para ofrecer respaldo contra las bebidas azucaradas, las cuales según ellos, suman a una dieta nutritivamente deficiente, que crea obesidad y diabetes.

En un esfuerzo por destacar los beneficios de esta prohibición propuesta, el Alcalde Bloomberg visitó el Montefiore Medical Center en el Bronx-un condado que ha sido catalogado como el menos saludable del estado.

“Un 58% de los neoyorquinos  en todo el estado están en sobrepeso u obesos.  En el Bronx, es  un 70%.  Esto significa 630,000 residentes del Bronx, quienes están en mayor riesgo de desarrollar una serie de enfermedades”, dijo el Alcalde Michael Bloomberg el martes 5 de junio en el vestíbulo del Montefiore Medical Center.

El Alcalde estuvo acompañado por el defensor público Bill de Blasio, y el presidente del condado de Manhattan Scott Stringer, así como el presidente y CEO de Montefiore Hospital, el Dr. Steven M. Safyer, y otros líderes comunitarios quienes expresaron su respaldo a la propuesta prohibición.

“We view this ban as something helpful to our members,” said President and Chief Executive Officer Pat Wang, speaking of the proposed ban on large sugary drinks. “The kids are not making choices. They are just taking what is in front of them.”

“Yo considero que vemos esta prohibición como algo que ayuda a nuestros miembros”, dijo Pat Wang, presidente y oficial ejecutivo principal, ante el Atrio del Recinto Moses en Montefiore.

El alcalde Bloomberg argumentó que la prohibición ayudaría a regular las selecciones para los niños, quienes sufren también de tasas de enfermedades a temprana edad.

“La obesidad no sólo afecta a los adultos.  Entre los estudiantes de escuela pública de la Ciudad de Nueva York, cerca de un 40% están en sobre peso u obesos”, dijo el Alcalde Bloomberg. “Trágicamente, cada uno de estos estudiantes enfrenta un mayor riesgo de muerte temprana.  De hecho, la obesidad es la segunda causa principal, luego del fumar, de muertes prevenibles en nuestra ciudad”.

“Cada niño se siente atraído hacia esa oportunidad máxima del azúcar”, dijo el Defensor Público Bill De Blasio.  “La dinámica del negocio lo torna actualmente difícil para que los padres cumplan con su deber.  En resumidas cuentas, son los padres de la ciudad quienes necesitan toda la ayuda que se les pueda para alejar a estos chicos de estas bebidas”.

“Una soda al día agrega hasta 50 libras de azúcar en un año”, dijo el Presidente del Condado de Manhattan Stringer.  “Los neoyorquinos tienen que comprender que esta lucha es una batalla para nuestros hijos.  Es una lucha para asegurarnos de que Nueva York comience a convertirse en la ciudad más saludable del mundo”.

Y al parecer, otros están dándose cuenta por todo el país.

Ese mismo martes en la mañana, Disney Parks emitió una declaración de que ya no ofrecerá bebidas azucaradas de más de 16 onzas en ninguno de sus parques.

Y la Primera Dama Michelle Obama, quien ha hecho el que una campaña contra la obesidad infantil sea una piedra angular de su tiempo en la  Casa Blanca, elogió también al Alcalde Bloomberg por la prohibición, expresando que ella “aplaude a cualquiera que salga al frente con cambios que funcionarán en sus comunidades”.

Dr. Steven M. Safyer, President and CEO of Montefiore Medical Center, stands in support of the ban. “This is the beginning,” he said.

El Dr. Steven M. Safyer, presidente y CEO de Montefiore Medical Center, respalda la prohibición.  “Este es el principio”, dijo él.

Los efectos del incremento en la obesidad pueden ser demostrados, conforme al Departamento de Salud de la Ciudad.

Actualmente, uno de cada tres neoyorquinos ya sea o sufre de diabetes o de una condición llamada pre-diabetes, una condición en la cual el azúcar en la sangre es mayor de lo normal, pero no lo suficiente como para ser considerado como diabetes.

Montefiore, uno de los principales suplidores de cuidado de salud y empleadores del Bronx,  observa que un tremendo número de pacientes están luchando contra enfermedades empeoradas por la obesidad.

“Vemos esta prohibición como algo importante”, dijo el Dr. Safyer. “La razón por la cual estamos tan entusiasmados es porque es el primer paso hacia un camino que puede cambiar la forma de la gente comportarse”.

“El tamaño es importante.  Un tamaño más grande contiene más calorías.”, agrego él, “y  la simple implementación y el enfoque para obtener vasos más pequeños hace que la gente lo piense”.

Montefiore ha intentado también el ser independientemente sensible ante mayores tasas de obesidad entre residentes del Bronx.

La organización ha fundado programas tales como B’N Fit, un programa para adolescentes para perder peso.  Este ha retirado las bebidas azucaradas y las comidas fritas de todas sus 131 instalaciones en todo el Bronx y proporciona clases de Zumba a 18,000 asociados y miembros comunitarios.

Alan D. Aviles, President and Chief Executive Officer of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), the largest municipal healthcare system in the nation, was also present. “[Obesity] is highly correlated with a literal tsunami of chronic disease that we see everyday in our hospitals and health centers.”

Alan D. Aviles, el presidente del ‘New York City Health y Hospitals Corporation (HHC, por sus siglas en ingles), el sistema municipal de salud más grande de la nación, estaba también presente. “[Obesidad] se correlaciona altamente con un tsunami literal de enfermedad crónica que vemos diario en nuestros hospitales y centros.”

Healthfirst, la primera organización de cuidado de la salud sin fines lucrativos, ha expresado también su respaldo a la prohibición.

“Yo considero que vemos esta prohibición como algo que ayuda a nuestros miembros”, dijo Pat Wang, presidente y oficial ejecutivo principal, ante el Atrio del Recinto Moses en Montefiore. “Para cuando usted requiera cuidado médico, ya será demasiado tarde. Los chicos no están tomando la decisión.   Solo toman lo que tienen ante sí”.

La administración argumenta que esto constituye también una batalla económica.

Se estima que anualmente los costos para luchar contra enfermedades relacionadas con la obesidad le cuesta a la ciudad $4 billones.

Y desde el 12 de junio, el Departamento de Salud de la ciudad tiene la intención de proponer la prohibición como una enmienda al Código de Salud, durante una reunión de la Junta de Salud el 12 de junio.

Forma parte de la meta del Alcalde Bloomberg de reducir en un 10% el porcentaje de adultos y en un 15% el de niños obesos en los próximos cinco años.

Lo que otros ven como ambicioso, el jefe de Montefiore Dr. Safyer, lo ve como la primera medida en la dirección correcta.

“Esto es tan sólo una parte de toda una gama de cosas las cuales necesitamos hacer”, dijo Dr. Safyer. “Este es el inicio.  Es educación, prevención, orientación, asociación escolar, trabajar con las familias, pero definitivamente que este es el primer paso”.