“They deserve better”
“Merecen algo mejor”

  • English
  • Español

“They deserve better”

Cuomo visits with NYCHA residents

Story by Gregg McQueen

Photos: Office of the Governor | Kevin P. Coughlin

Disgusting. Intolerable.

Those were a few of the words Governor Andrew Cuomo used to describe conditions at New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) complexes.

“Uninhabitable,” was how Governor Andrew Cuomo described the NYCHA apartments he visited.

“Uninhabitable,” was how Governor Andrew Cuomo described the NYCHA apartments he visited.

Cuomo toured NYCHA’s Jackson Houses on Mon., Mar. 12th, and said he witnessed apartments with mold, roaches, crumbling walls and peeling paint.

“We will no longer be ignored,” said NYCHA tenant leader Danny Barber. Photo: G. McQueen

“We will no longer be ignored,” said NYCHA
tenant leader Danny Barber.
Photo: G. McQueen

“The situation we have seen is as upsetting and disturbing as anything I have seen anywhere, and I’ve been through public housing all across the country,” remarked Cuomo, who said the apartments he saw were “crumbling around” tenants.

“It is disgusting, it’s uninhabitable, and it is just shocking that in New York State, we would have people who are subjected to these conditions,” he stated. “And on behalf of the people of the state, I apologize to the NYCHA residents, because they deserve better.”

More than 400,000 New Yorkers reside in NYCHA’s 326 public housing developments across the five boroughs.

Cuomo toured four units at the Jackson Houses in the Bronx, including the apartment of Jeffrey Blyther, a 12-year resident.

“It’s terrible,” Blyther said of the conditions in his apartment. “Roaches, paint falling off the wall, mold, just everything falling apart.”

He said that nothing gets done when he reports issues to NYCHA.

More than 400,000 New Yorkers reside in NYCHA public housing developments.

More than 400,000 New Yorkers reside in
NYCHA public housing developments.

“All they do is put a ticket in and they never show up,” said Blyther, who has a 14-month old grandson living with him. He said he hurt his back slipping on water from a leak in his apartment and now must use an electric scooter to get around.

Mary Gaines said she’s dealt with mold and lead paint as well as a damaged kitchen sink in her Jackson Houses apartment. She reported that her children suffer from asthma, which she said is made worse by the presence of mold in the apartment.

“There’s really no words for it. We shouldn’t be living like this,” remarked Gaines.

Joining Cuomo on the tour were Bronx Borough President Rubén Díaz Jr.; City Councilmember Ritchie Torres; Danny Barber, leader of the Citywide Council of Presidents (CCOP) and head of the Jackson Houses tenant association; and Dr. Howard Zucker, Commissioner of the New York State Department of Health (DOH).

Zucker called the conditions of apartments “shameful and are potentially dangerous” and recommended the state conduct a full investigation of health hazards such as lead paint and mold at NYCHA facilities.

“I apologize to the NYCHA residents, because they deserve better,” said Cuomo.

“I apologize to the NYCHA residents, because
they deserve better,” said Cuomo.

Cuomo said he had “no problem” declaring a state of emergency for NYCHA and suggested that the agency’s biggest problem is management, not funding.

“The maze of bureaucracy, they just can’t make the repairs fast enough,” said Cuomo.

“We need an expedited mechanism that can actually come in and get the work done without waiting for the NYCHA bureaucracy,” he added.

Barber said that public housing residents are tired of living in decrepit conditions and are banding together to fight for improvements through efforts like the recent lawsuit filed by CCOP and At-Risk Community Services.

“We’ve raised these issues for years, but NYCHA has repeatedly ignored our concerns, or failed to significantly address our issues,” Barber remarked.
“We will no longer be ignored,” he said.

“This is just a pure case of neglect. That’s all this is, is just neglect,” stated Cuomo, who asked the City Council, Mayor’s Office, and state legislature to guide him on how to remedy conditions at NYCHA.

He noted that he would meet with City Councilmembers in Albany the following day.

“Something needs to be done to change things,” said resident Cynthia Graham. Photo: G. McQueen

“Something needs to be done to change things,”
said resident Cynthia Graham.
Photo: G. McQueen

“I would like an answer from the City Council, what do they want the state to do specifically,” he said.

Cuomo called on the state legislature to approve design-build, which allows contractors to conduct work while designing the project, to address fixes more rapidly.

He said he wanted remedies placed in the state budget for April 1.

“I am open to all options,” he said.

A day after, on Tues., Mar. 13th, the State Assembly did announce the passage of the design-build legislation that would enable NYCHA to streamline renovations and rehabilitations, including the replacement of outdated boilers and heating systems. The bill also required greater transparency regarding NYCHA’s policies and procedures relating to lead-based paint poisoning prevention.

“Many NYCHA developments are aging and in need of maintenance and modernization,” said Speaker Carl Heastie in a statement. “This much needed legislation will allow NYCHA to make repairs more efficiently to ensure that the hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers are living in safe and healthy homes.”

During Monday’s press conference, Díaz affirmed that enacting design-build was a necessary solution for replacing boilers in NYCHA developments. He said that NYCHA has had funding to replace boilers at Patterson Houses since 2011, but the work has still not been completed.

State Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker said the conditions were “potentially dangerous.”

State Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker
said the conditions were “potentially dangerous.”

“They put up the Mario Cuomo Bridge in less time than it has taken the New York City Housing Authority to put in four boilers at the Paterson Houses. That is unacceptable,” Díaz stated.

Cuomo’s visit occurred as Mayor Bill de Blasio, who has recently sparred with the Governor over the state of NYCHA, was out of the city attending a conference of mayors in Texas.

City Councilmember Ritchie Torres was blunt in comparing de Blasio’s absence to his handling of NYCHA. “As you know, our mayor is out of town,” Torres said. “But the mayor has been out of town when it comes to the management of public housing.”

Following Cuomo’s press conference, de Blasio administration officials took to the steps of City Hall to hit back at the Governor and ask him to give NYCHA the $200 million it promised the agency last year. The state has said it would withhold the funds until the agency offered a more detailed plan on how the funds will be used.

“Some folks are conflating the notion of an emergency declaration with some magic cure-all,” said Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen. “By issuing an emergency declaration, that, in essence, gives us the money they were supposed to give us a year-and-a-half ago. I don’t see how that’s an emergency declaration. That’s doing your job.”

Outside of Jackson Houses, Cuomo pointed out that the state has no obligation to fund NYCHA, and that the agency is the only one of New York’s 150 housing authorities that has received state money.

“NYCHA hasn’t even been able to tell us how they would spend the money. That’s the point. There’s no point in giving an agency money that’s going to take three years to spend it,” Cuomo said.

Jackson Houses resident Cynthia Graham said she is glad to see the Governor stepping in to help.

“I feel good about it,” she said. “Something needs to be done to change things. They always want their rent, but they don’t want to fix anything.”


“Merecen algo mejor”

Cuomo visita a residentes de NYCHA

Historia por Gregg McQueen

Fotos: Oficina del gobernador | Kevin P. Coughlin

Asqueroso. Intolerable.

Esas fueron algunas de las palabras que utilizó el gobernador Andrew Cuomo para describir las condiciones en los complejos de la Autoridad de Vivienda de la Ciudad de Nueva York (NYCHA, por sus siglas en inglés).

The group visited four apartments.

El grupo visitó cuatro apartamentos.

Cuomo visitó las casas Jackson de NYCHA en el Bronx el lunes 12 de marzo y dijo que presenció apartamentos con moho, cucarachas, paredes desmoronadas y pintura cayéndose.

“Our mayor is out of town,” said Councilmember Ritchie Torres.

“Nuestro alcalde está fuera de la ciudad”, dijo el
concejal Ritchie Torres.

“La situación que hemos visto es tan molesta e inquietante como cualquier cosa que haya visto en cualquier lugar, y he estado en viviendas públicas en todo el país”, comentó Cuomo, explicando que los apartamentos que vio se estaban “derrumbando alrededor” de los inquilinos.

“Es repugnante, inhabitable e impactante que en el estado de Nueva York tengamos personas sometidas a estas condiciones”, afirmó. “Y en nombre de la gente del estado, me disculpo con los residentes de NYCHA, porque merecen algo mejor”.

Más de 400,000 neoyorquinos residen en los 326 desarrollos de vivienda pública de NYCHA en los cinco condados.

Cuomo recorrió cuatro unidades en las casas Jackson, incluido el apartamento de Jeffrey Blyther, un residente desde hace 12 años.

“Es terrible”, dijo Blyther sobre las condiciones en su apartamento. “Las cucarachas, la pintura que se cae de la pared, el moho, todo se derrumba”.

Cuomo spoke with resident Jeffrey Blyther. Photo: G. McQueen

Cuomo habló con el residente Jeffrey Blyther.
Foto: G. McQueen

Dijo que no se hace nada cuando informa problemas a NYCHA.

“Todo lo que hacen es poner una solicitud y nunca aparecen”, dijo Blyther, quien tiene un nieto de 14 meses que vive con él. Explicó que se lastimó la espalda al resbalar sobre el agua de una fuga en su apartamento y ahora debe usar un scooter eléctrico para moverse.

Mary Gaines comentó que lidió con el moho y la pintura con plomo, así como con un fregadero de cocina dañado en su apartamento de las casas Jackson. Informó que sus hijos sufren de asma, que según ella empeora por la presencia de moho en el apartamento.

“Realmente no hay palabras para eso. No deberíamos estar viviendo así”, dijo Gaines.

En el tour, se unieron a Cuomo el presidente del condado del Bronx, Rubén Díaz Jr.; el concejal Ritchie Torres; Danny Barber, líder el Concejo de Presidentes de la Ciudad (CCOP, por sus siglas en inglés) y presidente de la Asociación de Inquilinos de las casas Jackson; y el Dr. Howard Zucker, comisionado del Departamento de Salud del Estado de Nueva York (DOH, por sus siglas en inglés).

Zucker calificó las condiciones de los apartamentos como “vergonzosas y potencialmente peligrosas” y recomendó al estado realizar una investigación completa de los peligros para la salud, como la pintura con plomo y el moho, en las instalaciones de NYCHA.

“[This] is unacceptable,” said Bronx Borough President Rubén Díaz Jr. Photo: G. McQueen

“[Esto] es inaceptable”, dijo el presidente del
condado del Bronx, Rubén Díaz Jr.
Foto: G. McQueen

Cuomo dijo no tener “ningún problema” en declarar un estado de emergencia para NYCHA y sugirió que el mayor problema de la agencia es la administración, no el financiamiento.

“El laberinto de la burocracia, simplemente no pueden hacer las reparaciones lo suficientemente rápido”, dijo Cuomo.

“Necesitamos un mecanismo acelerado que realmente pueda llegar y hacer el trabajo sin esperar a la burocracia de NYCHA”, agregó.

Barber dijo que los residentes de viviendas públicas están cansados de vivir en condiciones ruinosas y se están uniendo para luchar por mejoras, a través de esfuerzos como la reciente demanda presentada por CCOP y Servicios Comunitarios At-Risk.

“Hemos planteado estos problemas durante años, pero NYCHA ha ignorado repetidamente nuestras inquietudes o no ha solucionado nuestros problemas de manera significativa”, comentó Barber.
“Ya no seremos ignorados”, dijo.

“Este es solo un caso puro de abandono. Eso es todo, es solo negligencia”, dijo Cuomo, quien solicitó al Concejo Municipal, a la Oficina del alcalde y a la legislatura estatal que lo guíen sobre cómo remediar las condiciones en NYCHA.

Chair Shola Olatoye.

La presidenta Shola Olatoye.

Señaló que se reunirá con los concejales en Albany el 13 de marzo.

“Me gustaría recibir una respuesta del Ayuntamiento, ¿qué quieren que el estado haga específicamente?”, dijo.

Cuomo pidió a la legislatura estatal aprobar el diseño y la construcción, que permite a los contratistas realizar trabajos mientras se diseña el proyecto, para abordar las reparaciones con mayor rapidez.

Dijo que quiere ver soluciones plasmadas en el presupuesto estatal para el 1º de abril.

“Estoy abierto a todas las opciones”, dijo.

Un día después, el martes 13 de marzo, la Asamblea Estatal anunció la aprobación de la legislación de diseño y construcción que permitirá a NYCHA optimizar las renovaciones y rehabilitaciones, incluida la sustitución de calderas obsoletas y sistemas de calefacción. El proyecto de ley también requería una mayor transparencia con respecto a las políticas y los procedimientos de NYCHA relacionados con la prevención del envenenamiento por pintura a base de plomo.

“Muchos desarrollos de NYCHA están envejeciendo y necesitan mantenimiento y modernización”, dijo el presidente Carl Heastie en un comunicado. “Esta legislación tan necesaria permitirá que NYCHA haga las reparaciones de manera más eficiente para garantizar que los cientos de miles de neoyorquinos vivan en hogares seguros y saludables”.

Durante la conferencia de prensa del lunes, Díaz afirmó que promulgar diseño-construcción era una solución necesaria para reemplazar las calderas en los desarrollos de NYCHA. Dijo que NYCHA ha tenido fondos para reemplazar las calderas en las casas Patterson desde 2011, pero el trabajo aún no se ha completado.

“Levantaron el puente Mario Cuomo en menos tiempo del que le tomó a la Autoridad de Vivienda de la Ciudad de Nueva York instalar cuatro calderas en las casas Paterson. Eso es inaceptable”, afirmó Díaz.

La visita de Cuomo ocurrió cuando el alcalde Bill de Blasio, quien recientemente se entrevistó con el gobernador sobre el estado de NYCHA, se encontraba fuera de la ciudad asistiendo a una conferencia de alcaldes en Texas.

State Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker said the conditions were “potentially dangerous.”

El comisionado estatal de Salud, el Dr. Howard
Zucker, dijo que las condiciones son
“potencialmente peligrosas”

El concejal Ritchie Torres fue franco al comparar la ausencia de de Blasio con su manejo de NYCHA. “Como saben, nuestro alcalde está fuera de la ciudad”, dijo Torres. “Pero el alcalde ha estado fuera de la ciudad cuando se trata de la administración de viviendas públicas”.

Después de la conferencia de prensa de Cuomo, funcionarios de la administración de Blasio tomaron las escalinatas del Ayuntamiento para devolver el golpe al gobernador y pedirle que le otorgue a NYCHA los $200 millones de dólares que prometió a la agencia el año pasado. El estado ha dicho que retendría los fondos hasta que la agencia ofreciera un plan más detallado sobre cómo se usarían.

“Algunas personas combinan la noción de una declaración de emergencia con alguna cura mágica”, dijo la vicealcaldesa Alicia Glen. “Al emitir una declaración de emergencia, eso, en esencia, nos da el dinero que supuestamente nos dieron hace año y medio. No veo cómo es una declaración de emergencia. Eso es hacer tu trabajo”.

Afuera de las casas Jackson, Cuomo señaló que el estado no tiene obligación de financiar a NYCHA, y que la agencia es la única de las 150 autoridades de vivienda de Nueva York que ha recibido dinero del estado.

“NYCHA ni siquiera ha podido decirnos cómo gastaría el dinero. Ese es el punto. No tiene sentido darle un dinero a la agencia que le tomará tres años gastar”, dijo Cuomo.

Cynthia Graham, residente de las casas Jackson, dijo que está contenta de ver al gobernador interviniendo para ayudar.

“Me siento bien al respecto”, dijo. “Se necesita hacer algo para cambiar las cosas. Siempre quieren el alquiler, pero no quieren arreglar nada”.