“There’s nothing left”
“No queda nada”

  • English
  • Español

“There’s nothing left”

Relief center in East Harlem aids Maria victims

Story by Gregg McQueen

Photos by Gregg McQueen and Cristóbal Vivar

“My home was completely destroyed,” says Ilia Rodríguez (left, with her daughter Iliana) of Ponce. “I can’t go back.” Her son was killed in the September 11th attacks. She has been staying with relatives and sleeping on a mattress on the floor.

“My home was completely destroyed,” says Ilia Rodríguez (left, with her daughter Iliana) of Ponce. “I can’t go back.” Her son was killed in the September 11th attacks. She has been staying with relatives and sleeping on a mattress on the floor.

The window in the living room blew out during the storm.

Her home was soon deluged with a torrent of rain and wind – and she and her infant were trapped inside while Hurricane Maria battered her hometown of Guaynabo in northern Puerto Rico.

“I hid in the building hallway with my baby for hours,” recalled Krystal Rodríguez.

The young mother arrived in New York on October 10 with her 9-month-old son, after her apartment building was damaged by the hurricane.

Rodríguez said staying in Puerto Rico became too difficult, especially with a young child. “The lines for food were so long,” she remarked.

“You’d wait for five hours just to get some bread and other basic things, and they only give you a little at a time.”

Rodríguez is staying in the city with her aunt, Theresa Nieves, but said the living arrangement is only temporary.

The center opened on October 19th. Photo: C. Vivar

The center opened on October 19th.
Photo: C. Vivar

“The building doesn’t know she’s there,” said Nieves. “I’m doing what I need to do. I can’t put her out on the street, but eventually she’ll need somewhere else to go.”

Jesús and Marangelly Laluz (right) and their five children are staying with Jesús’ aunt Iris. “There’s no water, no food, no jobs,” he reports of life back in Isabela.

Jesús and Marangelly Laluz (right) and their five children are staying with Jesús’ aunt Iris. “There’s no water, no food, no jobs,” he reports of life back in Isabela.

Rodríguez and other displaced residents of Puerto Rico are flocking to the city’s recently opened service center designed to assist hurricane victims.

Housed at the Julia De Burgos Latino Cultural Center in East Harlem, the center features city agencies and relief organizations onsite to provide in-person support and connect displaced people with essential services such as food and cash assistance, emergency pharmacy help and mental health counseling.

Visitors can also get legal assistance, case management and referrals for public schools.

The center, located at 1680 Lexington Avenue, opened on October 19.

Herman Schaffer, Assistant Commissioner of Community Outreach for the New York City Office of Emergency Management, said the center drew more than 75 families on its first day.

“What we want people to feel is that they’re welcome, so we want to make it as easy as possible for people to understand what is available to them,” said Schaffer. “We set up a center so people don’t need to run around to apply for different services, but can go to one spot.”

“What we want people to feel is that they’re welcome,” said Herman Schaffer, Assistant Commissioner of Community Outreach for the Office of Emergency Management.

“What we want people to feel is that they’re welcome,” said Herman Schaffer, Assistant Commissioner of Community Outreach for the Office of Emergency Management.

Onsite agencies include the Department of Health, Department of Social Services, Department for the Aging and Department of Education. In addition, the American Red Cross of Greater New York is on hand to provide disaster relief management and supplies, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is distributing pet supplies and New York Disaster Interfaith Services is providing spiritual care.

The city is strongly encouraging people to make an appointment before visiting the center by calling 311.

“The reason for that is it’ll be more efficient for their time,” said Schaeffer. “They’ll get here, and they’ll have an appointment, and we take those folks first, and then we take in our walk-ins.”

Jesús Laluz and his wife Marangelly arrived in New York City from Isabela in Puerto Rico on October 14, along with their five children.

“Our house was destroyed,” he said. “There’s no water, no food, no jobs.”

Jesús and Marangelly visited the center on October 20 with their 17-month-old son, in order to secure food stamps, supplies for the children and referrals for housing.

“We were able to get a lot of big help,” Laluz said.

Lynda Marín brought her 86-year-old mother Socorro (seated in wheelchair) from Mayagüez. She was running out of medication and the pharmacies had remained closed. “Things are still treacherous there,” says Lynda, here with family friend Rosa.

Lynda Marín brought her 86-year-old mother Socorro (seated in wheelchair) from Mayagüez. She was running out of medication and the pharmacies had remained closed. “Things are still treacherous there,” says Lynda, here with family friend Rosa.

The family is currently staying with Jesus’ aunt Iris in Queens. “I’m helping them out, but they need housing in the city,” Iris said.

“This has been hard on the kids,” she added. “They don’t understand what is going on.”

She slammed the government’s response to the devastation in Puerto Rico, and predicted that elected officials could pay a price.

“All of these people being displaced might eventually become voters here,” she said.

When displaced individuals first arrive at the center, they fill out a universal intake form through an interview process with OEM staffers.

The form can be used to provide details to all of the city agencies stationed at the center, so hurricane victims don’t need to repeat their information at every table, Schaffer explained.

The majority of the OEM staff is bilingual, he said, so translators are not typically needed, and the center has been able to accommodate all the walk-ins so far.

Schaffer stressed that the hurricane relief center does not offer housing for people, but is offering referrals to housing support.

City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, a native of Puerto Rico, has made numerous visits to the center to speak with families.

Mark-Viverito said she became “very emotional” when she first witnessed the displaced Puerto Ricans assembled at the intake.

“I hid in the building hallway with my baby for hours,” recalled Krystal Rodríguez, who had to leave her hometown of Guaynabo with her 9-month-old son. Photo: C. Vivar

“I hid in the building hallway with my baby for hours,” recalled Krystal Rodríguez, who had to leave her hometown of Guaynabo with her 9-month-old son.
Photo: C. Vivar

“You see the level of frustration and desperation. I walked into the room and you don’t expect to see 75 people, saying they don’t have food or don’t know where they’re going to stay the next day,” she said.

Mark-Viverito, who has been an outspoken critic of the Trump administration’s response in assisting Puerto Rico, said the city must take the lead to protect residents of the commonwealth.

“I’m thrilled that we’re helping Puerto Rico in many different ways. We’re going to do what we can, but still, a month out, we don’t see the level of support at the federal level that we should be seeing,” she said. “A month out, and people are still hungry and don’t have water, the basics.”

Currently, the city has no planned end date for operating the center, Schaffer said.

“So long as we see a need, we will be able to accommodate that.”

Manhattan resident Lynda Marín had been visiting her 86-year old mother Socorro in Mayagüez when Hurricane Maria hit the island.

Marin said the two were stuck in Mayagüez for three weeks, and she knew she needed to bring her mother, who is in a wheelchair and suffering from medical issues, back to New York City.

“The reality is, for someone like her, at her age and needing care, they are not able to stay on the island,” Marín said. “Things are still treacherous there.”

She said her mother was running out of medication in Puerto Rico and pharmacies were closed, but the family found assistance at the relief center.

The center is located in East Harlem.

The center is located in East Harlem.

“They’re going to expedite getting her medications, and gave her referrals for healthcare,” said Marín.

Ilia Rodríguez visited the center to inquire about food assistance, housing and medical services.
The residence of Ponce was not on the island when Hurricane Maria hit ― she lost her son, a paramedic, on 9/11 and returns to New York each year to witness the memorial ceremony at the World Trade Center site.

“I was in New York City and just missed the hurricane,” Rodríguez said. “But my home was completely destroyed. I can’t go back.”

Currently, she alternates between staying with her daughter in Queens and her brother on Long Island, sleeping on a mattress on the floor.

“It’s hard on me,” said Rodríguez, who said she suffers from depression. “First my son, now my home.”

Jesús Laluz and his two-year-old son Adrien. Photo: William Alatriste | NYC Council

Jesús Laluz and his two-year-old son Adrien.
Photo: William Alatriste | NYC Council

She said she has now planned to stay in New York City for good, as she believes the Puerto Rico will take years to recover.

“I don’t like the weather here, but I do have family and there’s nothing left back there,” she remarked.

Krystal Rodríguez knows she and her son cannot stay with her aunt indefinitely.

Though her future is uncertain, she was adamant that she would not return to her homeland.

“I don’t want to go back,” she stated. “It’s not the same Puerto Rico.”

The city’s hurricane relief center is located at the Julia De Burgos Latino Cultural Center, 1680 Lexington Avenue in Manhattan. It will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays, and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sundays.

For more information or to make an appointment, visit nyc.gov or call 311.

“No queda nada”

Centro de alivio ayuda a las víctimas de María

Historia por Gregg McQueen

Fotos por Gregg McQueen y Cristóbal Vivar

“You see the level of frustration and desperation,” said Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito.

“Ves el nivel de frustración y desesperación”, dijo la presidenta Melissa Mark-Viverito.

La ventana de la sala de estar estalló durante la tormenta.

Su hogar pronto fue inundado por un torrente de lluvia y viento, y ella y su bebé quedaron atrapados dentro mientras el huracán María azotaba su municipio de Guaynabo en el norte de Puerto Rico.

“Me escondí en el pasillo del edificio con mi bebé durante horas”, recordó Krystal Rodríguez.

La joven madre llegó a Nueva York el 10 de octubre con su hijo de 9 meses, después de que su edificio de apartamentos fuese dañado por el huracán.

Rodríguez dijo que quedarse en Puerto Rico se volvió demasiado difícil, especialmente con un niño pequeño. “Las filas para la comida eran muy largas”, comentó.

“Esperabas cinco horas solo para obtener pan y otras cosas básicas, y solo te daban un poco cada vez”.

Rodríguez se está quedando en la ciudad con su tía, Theresa Nieves, pero dijo que el arreglo de vivienda es solo temporal.

Jesús Laluz and his two-year-old son Adrien. Photo: William Alatriste | NYC Council

Jesús Laluz y su hijo Adrien de dos años de edad.
Foto: William Alatriste | Concejo NYC

“El edificio no sabe que ella está allí”, dijo Nieves. “Estoy haciendo lo que necesito hacer. No puedo sacarla a la calle, pero eventualmente necesitará ir a otro lugar”.

Rodríguez y otros residentes desplazados de Puerto Rico están acudiendo en masa al recientemente inaugurado centro de servicio de la ciudad, diseñado para ayudar a las víctimas de los huracanes.

Ubicado en el Centro Cultural Latino Julia de Burgos en East Harlem, el centro cuenta con agencias municipales y organizaciones de ayuda en el lugar para brindar apoyo en persona y conectar a las personas desplazadas con servicios esenciales, como alimentos y apoyo en efectivo, ayuda de emergencia y asesoría de salud mental.

Los visitantes también pueden obtener asistencia legal, administración de casos y referencias para escuelas públicas.

El centro, ubicado en el No. 1680 de la Avenida Lexington, abrió el 19 de octubre.

Herman Schaffer, comisionado asistente de Alcance Comunitario de la Oficina de Manejo de Emergencias de la ciudad de Nueva York, dijo que el centro atrajo a más de 75 familias en su primer día.

The center is located in East Harlem.

El centro está ubicado en East Harlem.

“Queremos que las personas sientan que son bienvenidas y que entiendan lo más fácil posible que está disponible para ellas”, dijo Schaffer. “Creamos un centro para que las personas no tengan que deambular para solicitar diferentes servicios, sino que puedan ir a un solo lugar”.

Las agencias in situ incluyen el Departamento de Salud, el Departamento de Servicios Sociales, el Departamento para el Envejecimiento y el Departamento de Educación. Además, la Cruz Roja Americana del Gran Nueva York está a su disposición para proporcionar administración y suministros para alivio de desastres, la Sociedad Americana para la Prevención de la Crueldad hacia los Animales está distribuyendo suministros para mascotas y los Servicios Interreligiosos de Desastres de Nueva York brindan atención espiritual.

La ciudad recomienda encarecidamente a las personas que hagan una cita antes de visitar el centro llamando al 311.

“La razón de eso es que será más eficiente para su tiempo”, dijo Schaeffer. “Llegarán aquí, tendrán una cita y tomaremos a esa gente primero. Luego veremos a nuestros clientes sin cita”.

“I hid in the building hallway with my baby for hours,” recalled Krystal Rodríguez, who had to leave her hometown of Guaynabo with her 9-month-old son. Photo: C. Vivar

“Me escondí en el pasillo del edificio con mi bebé durante horas”, recordó Krystal Rodríguez, quien tuvo que salir de su pueblo Guaynabo con su hijo de nueve meses.
Foto: C. Vivar

Jesús Laluz y su esposa Marangelly llegaron a Ciudad de Nueva York desde Isabela en Puerto Rico el 14 de octubre, junto con sus cinco hijos.

“Nuestra casa fue destruida”, dijo. “No hay agua, ni comida, ni trabajo”.

Jesús y Marangelly visitaron el centro el 20 de octubre con su hijo de 17 meses con el fin de asegurar cupones de alimentos, suministros para los niños y referencias para la vivienda.

“Pudimos obtener mucha ayuda”, dijo Laluz.

La familia se está quedando con la tía de Jesús, Iris, en Queens. “Les estoy ayudando, pero necesitan vivienda en la ciudad”, dijo Iris.

“Esto ha sido duro para los niños”, agregó. “No entienden lo que está pasando”.

Ella criticó la respuesta del gobierno a la devastación en Puerto Rico, y predijo que los funcionarios electos podrían pagar un precio.

“Todas estas personas desplazadas eventualmente se convertirán en votantes aquí”, dijo.

Cuando las personas desplazadas llegan por primera vez al centro, completan un formulario de admisión universal a través de un proceso de entrevista con personal de OEM.

El formulario se puede utilizar para proporcionar detalles a todas las agencias de la ciudad ubicadas en el centro, por lo que las víctimas de huracanes no necesitan repetir su información en cada mesa, explicó Schaffer.

Lynda Marín brought her 86-year-old mother Socorro (seated in wheelchair) from Mayagüez. She was running out of medication and the pharmacies had remained closed. “Things are still treacherous there,” says Lynda, here with family friend Rosa.

Lynda Marín trajo a su madre Socorro (sentada en silla de ruedas) de 86 años, de Mayagüez. Se estaba quedando sin medicamentos y las farmacias permanecían cerradas. “Las cosas todavía son peligrosas allá”, dice Lynda, aquí con su amiga Rosa.

La mayoría del personal de OEM es bilingüe, dijo, por lo que los traductores no suelen ser necesarios, y el centro ha podido dar cabida a todos los clientes sin cita hasta el momento.

Schaffer hizo hincapié en que el centro de alivio contra huracanes no ofrece viviendas a las personas, sino referencias para el apoyo de vivienda.

La presidenta del Concejo Municipal, Melissa Mark-Viverito, nativa de Puerto Rico, ha realizado numerosas visitas al centro para hablar con las familias.

Mark-Viverito dijo que se sintió “muy conmovida” cuando vio por primera vez a los puertorriqueños desplazados reunidos en la entrada.

“Ves el nivel de frustración y desesperación. Entré en la habitación y no esperé ver a 75 personas diciendo que no tenían comida y que no sabían dónde se quedarían el día siguiente”, dijo.

Mark-Viverito, quien ha sido una abierta crítica de la respuesta de la administración Trump respecto a la ayuda para Puerto Rico, dijo que la ciudad debe tomar la iniciativa para proteger a los residentes del territorio autónomo.

“Estoy encantado de que estemos ayudando a Puerto Rico de muchas maneras diferentes. Vamos a hacer lo que podamos, pero aun así, un mes después, no vemos el apoyo a nivel federal que deberíamos estar viendo”, dijo. “Un mes después, la gente aún tiene hambre y no tiene agua, lo básico”.

Actualmente, la ciudad no tiene una fecha de finalización planificada para operar el centro, dijo Schaffer.

“What we want people to feel is that they’re welcome,” said Herman Schaffer, Assistant Commissioner of Community Outreach for the Office of Emergency Management.

“Lo que queremos que las personas sientan es que son bienvenidas”, dijo Herman Schaffer, comisionado asistente de Alcance Comunitario de la Oficina de Manejo de Emergencias.

“Mientras veamos una necesidad, podremos dar hospedaje”.

La residente de Manhattan, Lynda Marín, visitaba a su madre Socorro, de 86 años, en Mayagüez, cuando el huracán María azotó la isla.

Marín dijo que las dos estuvieron atrapadas en Mayagüez por tres semanas y que ella sabía que necesitaba llevar a su madre, quien está en silla de ruedas y sufre problemas médicos, de regreso a Ciudad de Nueva York.

“La realidad es que, para alguien como ella, a su edad y que necesita cuidados, no puede quedarse en la isla”, dijo. “Las cosas todavía son peligrosas allá”.

Dijo que su madre se estaba quedando sin medicamentos en Puerto Rico y que las farmacias estaban cerradas, pero la familia encontró asistencia en el centro de alivio.

“Van a acelerar la obtención de sus medicamentos y le dieron referencias para atención médica”, dijo Marín.

Ilia Rodríguez visitó el centro para preguntar sobre asistencia alimentaria, vivienda y servicios médicos.

La residente de Ponce no estaba en la isla cuando azotó el huracán María; perdió a su hijo, un paramédico, el 11 de septiembre y regresa a Nueva York cada año para presenciar la ceremonia conmemorativa en el sitio del World Trade Center.

Jesús and Marangelly Laluz (right) and their five children are staying with Jesús’ aunt Iris. “There’s no water, no food, no jobs,” he reports of life back in Isabela.

Jesús y Marangelly Laluz (derecha) y sus cinco hijos se quedan con la tía de Jesús, Iris. “No hay agua, no hay comida, no hay trabajo”, informa de la vida en Isabela.

“Estaba en la ciudad de Nueva York y simplemente me perdí el huracán”, dijo Rodríguez. “Pero mi casa fue completamente destruida. No puedo regresar”.

Actualmente alterna entre quedarse con su hija en Queens y su hermano en Long Island, durmiendo en un colchón en el piso.

The center opened on October 19th. Photo: C. Vivar

El centro se abrió el 19 de octubre.
Foto: C. Vivar

“Es difícil para mí”, dijo Rodríguez, quien dijo que sufre de depresión. “Primero mi hijo, ahora mi hogar”.

Ella dijo que ahora ha planeado quedarse en la ciudad de Nueva York para siempre, ya que cree que Puerto Rico tardará años en recuperarse.

“No me gusta el clima aquí, pero tengo familia y ya no queda nada allá”, comentó.

Krystal Rodríguez sabe que ella y su hijo no pueden quedarse con su tía indefinidamente.

Aunque su futuro es incierto, ella insistió en que no volvería a su tierra natal.

“No quiero volver”, afirmó. “No es el mismo Puerto Rico”.

El centro de alivio del huracán de la ciudad se encuentra en el Centro Cultural Latino Julia de Burgos, No. 1680 de la Avenida Lexington en Manhattan.

Estará abierto de lunes a viernes de 9 a.m. a 5 p.m., los sábados de 10 a.m. a 4 p.m. y los domingos de 1 p.m. a 5 p.m.

Para obtener más información o para programar una cita, visite nyc.gov o llame al 311.