The Contingent of Clowns
El contingente de payasos

  • English
  • Español

The Contingent of Clowns

By Karina Casiano | Voices of New York

This past Sunday, under a sweltering 95-degree sun, I put on a red clown nose, a pava – a traditional straw hat commonly used by jíbaros, or peasant farmers – grabbed a wood machete, and marched in the Puerto Rican Day Parade alongside a group of fellow Puerto Rican-born artists.

A much-revered and familiar figure in Puerto Rican culture, the jíbaro is considered the epitome of the hardworking, dispossessed people of the country, exploited by the rich, foreign owners of the land.

In formation. Photo: Cris Vivar  

In formation.
Photo: Cris Vivar

The organizers of the clown platoon – an informal group of collaborators from different artistic disciplines, led by actors Israel Lugo, Andrea Martínez, Yussef Soto-Villarini and Roy Sánchez-Vahamonde – were brought from Puerto Rico by La Marqueta Retoña, a cultural center located in East Harlem.

A young girl steps up. Photo: Cris Vivar

A young girl steps up.
Photo: Cris Vivar

Their task was to organize a performance for this year’s parade that recreated the immersive, role-playing style of protest that has attracted attention on the island. Their form of protest has taken on particular resonance during the recent wave of demonstrations in opposition to draconian “austerity” measures imposed by PROMESA, a financial oversight board named by Obama’s White House to address the country’s $72-billion-dollar debt.

Back home, the performers dress up as “The Clown Police,” wearing red noses and cardboard “bullet-proof” vests, spraying people with silly string instead of pepper spray, and carrying brooms as weapons, in reference to San Juan’s municipal government’s promise to “sweep the streets” to do away with undesirables. Once at the site of the demonstration, the clown cops stand side-by-side with the real ones, and interact with them and the protesters in a light, satirical tone to reveal the absurd rationale of the government’s rhetoric, effectively defusing tension.

The Puerto Rican Day Parade version, it was decided, would feature a platoon of clown jíbaros and jíbaras instead, dubbed, on this day, jíbaros en resistencia. The change was made to avoid giving the impression that the characters were criticizing the police association that refused to appear at the event due to its original intention to honor Oscar López Rivera, the recently-freed pro-independence militant who spent 35 years in jail in the U.S. for seditious conspiracy.

Firm standing. Photo: Cris Vivar

Firm standing.
Photo: Cris Vivar

 “At a time when Puerto Rico is undergoing a period of scarcity, what better icon [than the jíbaro] to spark a reflection on the basic rights of our people: home, food, health and education?” the artists asked in the official description of their intervention at the parade, adding that they “employ clowning technique to bring a message of justice, equality, love and freedom.”

As the group of between 40 and 50 jíbaras and jíbaros – most of us were born in Puerto Rico, and migrated after graduating college – walked in formation along Fifth Avenue, the crowd enthusiastically called out the words we had painted the night before on our machetes to spell out our message: “education, freedom, justice, health, resistance, solidarity.”

In keeping with the cheerful environment, spectators had the most fun with common Puerto Rican curse words such as “puñeta” and “coño, despierta” – roughly translated as “wake up, goddammit” – which has become an anti-colonialist slogan in Puerto Rico.

As we marched, the clown “commander” called out his orders, which we had codified over the course of a two-day workshop at the Johnson Community Center in East Harlem. During that time, we got acquainted with clowning techniques and collectively came up with movements and commands that we thought would look striking and that expressed our frustration with the current social and economic crisis on the island.

A declaration, de machete. Photo: Cris Vivar

A declaration, de machete.
Photo: Cris Vivar

As we approached 57th Street, a last-minute new command was introduced by platoon leader Israel Lugo, who originated the clown police in Puerto Rico in 2009. When we reached Trump Tower, we performed the specially-crafted salute, which included an Italian salute, after which we turned around, bent over and showed our machete between our legs, pointing at the building. A “man-in-a-suit” standing told us to move along, but our commanders decided that we needed to repeat the gesture to make sure our sentiment was clear.

So we did it again and continued marching.

This year’s parade was not the usual sea of red, white and blue; there was quite a bit of black too. In recent years, a black and white version of the Puerto Rican flag has become a symbol of popular discontent over the island’s situation, and has become ubiquitous on social media and, as the parade floats demonstrated, everywhere else. The customary joyful salsa dancing, the majorettes, the celebrities and beauty queens waving from their floats were in attendance, as always, but many floats reflected a grittier, darker aesthetic, and edgy, bizarre puppets marched right after traditional ones.

The audience was mostly supportive. Most people enthusiastically yelled out expressions of gratitude, and I heard phrases such as “¡Jíbaro hasta la muerte!” – “Jíbaro till I die!” –; “¡Viva la UPI!” – “Long live the University of Puerto Rico!” and even, “Viva Puerto Rico libre y socialista” – “Long live Puerto Rico, free and socialist” a very popular slogan in the 1970’s.

The author (center). Photo: Melvin Audaz

The author (center).
Photo: Melvin Audaz

Some fellow platoon members did say, however, that they heard spectators critiquing the anti-colonial message, with one of them yelling out: “Didn’t you study thanks to a Pell grant?” and another asking if we were siding with Oscar López Rivera. No one, though, seemed to miss the disgruntled commercial sponsors who withdrew their support because of the controversy over Oscar López Rivera, and who every year litter Fifth Avenue with their cardboard fans and other merchandising.

When I first learned that these artists – some of them old friends and fellow theater makers – were coming to New York to recreate their striking performance protest here and that they were calling on like-minded Puerto Rican-born artists to put their bodies and voices out there for the island, I was in awe.

These are artists who have remained in Puerto Rico, stubbornly defying the pessimism and the frustration they admit to feeling. I am humbled by their commitment, their assertiveness and their agency.

Workshops were held beforehand. Photo: Cris Vivar

Workshops were held beforehand.
Photo: Cris Vivar

Street theater is grueling, thankless and exhausting. Sunday was going to be the hottest day of the year so far. I wanted to be there.

They asked us to join them because they know our hearts are broken too.

A specific salute. Photo: Melvin Audaz

A specific salute.
Photo: Melvin Audaz

As Lugo told me, “I thought: ‘If Puerto Ricans living in New York invite us, then it makes sense to have a “platoon” in New York.’ The oversight board meets in New York, I remember seeing that people here were staging demonstrations for Oscar quite often… So, it made sense to have representation here.”

Even though some of us had not seen each other in decades, we all knew why we were there and we had a shorthand that our shared culture and training awarded us. If we did not already know each other, we quickly became friends, and we marched without a hitch. Despite the dire circumstances that brought us together this time, we had fun.

Tired and satisfied, after about three hours marching, we all said goodbye warmly but not definitively, because we know full well that we will likely meet again sometime soon to continue this century-old fight against colonialism.

Karina Casiano is a New York-based actress born in Puerto Rico.

This article first appeared in Voice of New York, of the Center for Community and Ethnic Media (CCEM) at the CUNY School of Journalism. For more information, please visit http://bit.ly/2sYuTsm.

El contingente de payasos

Por Karina Casiano

El domingo pasado, bajo un sol sofocante de 95 grados, me puse una nariz roja de payaso, una pava –un sombrero de paja tradicional comúnmente utilizado por jíbaros, o agricultores campesinos- tomé un machete de madera y marché en el Desfile del Día de Puerto Rico junto con un grupo de artistas puertorriqueños.

Una figura muy venerada y familiar en la cultura puertorriqueña, el jíbaro es considerado el epítome de la gente trabajadora y desposeída del país, explotada por los ricos propietarios extranjeros de la tierra.

Los organizadores del pelotón de payasos -un grupo informal de colaboradores de diferentes disciplinas artísticas, liderados por los actores Israel Lugo, Andrea Martínez, Youssef Soto-Villarini y Roy Sánchez-Vahamonde- fueron traídos de Puerto Rico por La Marqueta Retoña, un centro cultural ubicado en East Harlem.

A specific salute. Photo: Melvin Audaz

Un saludo específico.
Foto: Melvin Audaz

Su tarea era organizar una actuación para el desfile de este año que recreara el juego de roles de inmersión de protesta que ha atraído la atención en la isla. Su forma de protesta ha tomado especial relevancia desde la reciente oleada de manifestaciones en oposición a las medidas draconianas de “austeridad” impuestas por PROMESA, una junta de supervisión financiera nombrada por la Casa Blanca de Obama para hacer frente a la deuda $ 72 mil millones de dólares del país.

En casa, los artistas se visten como “La Policía de los Payasos”, llevando narices rojas y chalecos de cartón “a prueba de balas”, rociando a la gente con una cuerda tonta en lugar de spray de pimienta, y llevando escobas como armas, en referencia a la promesa del gobierno municipal de San Juan de “barrer las calles” para acabar con indeseables. Una vez en el lugar de la manifestación, los payasos policías se colocan uno al lado del otro con los auténticos, e interactúan con ellos y los manifestantes con un tono satírico para revelar la lógica absurda de la retórica del gobierno, desactivando la tensión.

La versión del desfile del Día de Puerto Rico, se decidió, contaría con un pelotón de payasos jíbaros y jíbaras en este día, apodados, jíbaros en resistencia. El cambio se hizo para evitar dar la impresión de que los personajes estaban criticando a la asociación policial que se negó a aparecer en el evento debido a su intención original de honrar a Oscar López Rivera, el recientemente liberado militante independentista que pasó 35 años en la cárcel en los Estados Unidos por conspiración sediciosa.

Workshops were held beforehand. Photo: Cris Vivar

Se realizaron talleres de antemano.
Foto: Cris Vivar

“En un momento en que Puerto Rico está pasando por un período de escasez, ¿qué mejor icono [que el jíbaro] para despertar una reflexión sobre los derechos básicos de nuestro pueblo: hogar, alimentación, salud y educación?”, preguntan los artistas en la descripción oficial de su intervención en el desfile, añadiendo que “emplean la técnica del payaso para llevar un mensaje de justicia, igualdad, amor y libertad”.

The author (center). Photo: Melvin Audaz

La autora (centro).
Foto: Melvin Audaz

Mientras el grupo de entre 40 y 50 jíbaras y jíbaros -la mayoría nacimos en Puerto Rico y emigramos después de graduarnos de la universidad- caminaba en formación a lo largo de la Quinta Avenida, la gente entonó con entusiasmo las palabras que habíamos pintado la noche anterior en nuestros machetes para explicar nuestro mensaje: educación, libertad, justicia, salud, resistencia, solidaridad. En línea con el ambiente alegre, los espectadores se divirtieron con las palabras comunes de la maldición puertorriqueña como “puñeta” y “coño, despierta“, que se ha convertido en un eslogan anticolonialista en Puerto Rico.

Al marchar, el “comandante” payaso gritó sus órdenes, las cuales habíamos codificado durante el curso de un taller de dos días en el Centro Comunitario Johnson en East Harlem. Durante ese tiempo nos familiarizamos con las técnicas de payasadas y colectivamente surgieron movimientos y mandamientos que pensábamos que parecían sorprendentes y que expresaban nuestra frustración con la actual crisis social y económica en la isla.

Cuando nos acercamos a la calle 57, un nuevo comando de último minuto fue introducido por el líder del pelotón Israel Lugo, quien desarrolló la policía payaso en Puerto Rico en 2009. Cuando llegamos a la Trump Tower, realizamos el saludo especialmente elaborado, que incluyo un saludo italiano, después de lo cual nos dimos la vuelta, nos inclinamos y mostramos nuestro machete entre nuestras piernas, apuntando al edificio. Un “hombre de traje” parado nos dijo que nos moviéramos, pero nuestros comandantes decidieron que necesitábamos repetir el gesto para asegurarnos de que nuestro sentimiento fuese claro.

A declaration, de machete. Photo: Cris Vivar

Una declaración, de machete.
Foto: Cris Vivar

Así lo hicimos de nuevo y continuamos marchando.

El desfile de este año no fue el usual mar de rojo, blanco y azul; hubo un poco de negro también. En los últimos años, una versión en blanco y negro de la bandera puertorriqueña se ha convertido en un símbolo del descontento popular por la situación de la isla, y se ha convertido en omnipresente en las redes sociales y, como demostraron los carros alegóricos, en todas partes. El habitual traje de salsa, los majorettes, las celebridades y las reinas de belleza saludando desde sus carros alegóricos estuvieron presentes, como siempre, pero muchos reflejaban una estética más cruda y oscura, y títeres extravagantes y nerviosos marchaban justo después de los tradicionales.

El público estuvo apoyando en su mayoría, gritando con entusiasmo expresiones de gratitud, y oí frases como: “¡Jíbaro hasta la muerte!”, “¡Jíbaro hasta que muera!”, “¡Viva la UPI!”, “Viva la Universidad de Puerto Rico!”, e incluso, “¡Viva Puerto Rico libre y socialista!”, un eslogan muy popular en la década de 1970.

Firm standing. Photo: Cris Vivar

Firme de pie.
Foto: Cris Vivar

Algunos compañeros de pelotón dijeron, sin embargo, que escucharon a los espectadores criticar el mensaje anticolonial, con uno de ellos gritando: “¿No estudiaron gracias a una beca Pell?”, y otro preguntando si estábamos de acuerdo con Oscar López Rivera. Sin embargo, nadie pareció extrañar a los disgustados patrocinadores comerciales que retiraron su apoyo debido a la polémica sobre Oscar López Rivera, y que cada año contaminan la Quinta Avenida con sus fanáticos de cartón y otras promociones.

A young girl steps up. Photo: Cris Vivar

Una niña participa.
Foto: Cris Vivar

Cuando supe por primera vez que estos artistas –algunos de ellos viejos amigos y compañeros de teatro-  vinieron a Nueva York para recrear su sorprendente protesta actuada aquí e invitaron a artistas puertorriqueños de ideas afines a llevar sus cuerpos y voces, yo estaba asombrada.

Son artistas que han permanecido en Puerto Rico, desafiando obstinadamente el pesimismo y la frustración que admiten sentir. Me siento muy honrada por su compromiso, su firmeza y su agencia.

El teatro callejero es duro, ingrato y agotador. El domingo iba a ser el día más caluroso del año hasta ahora. Yo quería estar ahí.

Nos pidieron que nos uniéramos a ellos porque saben que nuestros corazones también están rotos.

Como Lugo me dijo, pensé: “Si los puertorriqueños que viven en Nueva York nos invitan, entonces tiene sentido tener un ‘pelotón’ en Nueva York”. La junta de supervisión se reúne en Nueva York, Recuerdo haber visto que la gente aquí organizaba demostraciones para Oscar muy a menudo … Por lo tanto, tenía sentido tener representación aquí.

In formation. Photo: Cris Vivar  

En formación.
Foto: Cris Vivar

A pesar de que algunos de nosotros no nos habíamos visto en décadas, todos sabíamos por qué estábamos ahí y teníamos una clave que nuestra cultura compartida y el entrenamiento nos concedieron. Si no nos conocíamos ya, rápidamente nos hicimos amigos y marchamos sin problemas. A pesar de las terribles circunstancias que nos unieron esta vez, nos divertimos.

Cansados y satisfechos, después de unas tres horas de marcha, todos nos despedimos calurosamente, pero no definitivamente, porque sabemos muy bien que probablemente nos volveremos a encontrar en algún momento pronto para continuar esta lucha centenaria contra el colonialismo.

Karina Casiano es una actriz nacida en Puerto Rico que vive en Nueva York.

Este artículo apareció por primera vez en Voices of New York, del Centro de Medios Comunitarios y Étnicos (CCEM por sus siglas en ingles) de la Escuela de Periodismo de CUNY. Para obtener más información, visite http://bit.ly/2sYuTsm.