The Beat of Berns
Berns del Bronx

  • English
  • Español

The Beat of Berns

Story by Sherry Mazzocchi

“[Berns] was a songwriter who liked to push his singers to the edge of despair,” says biographer Joel Selvin.

“[Berns] was a songwriter who liked to push his singers to the edge of despair,” says biographer Joel Selvin.

Burt Berns loved music, probably more than anything else.

Growing up in the Bronx in the 1940’s and 50’s, he’d go to the Tremont Terrace, later called the Trocadero, to hear the Mambo.

He’d spend entire nights on the dance floor, swaying to the music of Latin jazz musicians Machito, Tito Puente and Arsenio Rodríguez.

By incorporating Afro-Cuban rhythms into rhythm and blues, Berns became one of the most influential songwriters and producers of the 1960’s, blazing through the decade with a string of hits, including: “Twist and Shout”, “Here Comes the Night”, “Hang on Sloopy” and “Piece of my Heart”. He made the early careers of singers Solomon Burke, Ben E. King, The Exciters, Isley Brothers, Van Morrison and Neil Diamond.

“He was a songwriter who liked to push his singers to the edge of despair—right at the abyss of heart break,” said biographer Joel Selvin. “He obviously had a dark inner life that he kept hidden. It leaks out in little moments.”

Even though Berns worked with music industry titan Jerry Wexler and Ahmet Ertegun, his name is largely forgotten – mostly because he became enemies with the powerful men.

But his stint in obscurity may soon come to an end.

Berns is the subject of a new biography, an Off-Broadway musical and a forthcoming documentary.

Songwriter, producer and Bronx native Burt Berns admired, among others, Latin jazz musicians Machito and Tito Puente.

Songwriter, producer and Bronx native Burt Berns admired, among others, Latin jazz musicians Machito and Tito Puente.

Selvin spent 16 years writing Here Comes the Night: The Dark Soul of Bert Berns and the Dirty Business of Rhythm and Blues. Selvin, considered the “Mickey Spillane” of rock journalism, quickly realized Berns’ story couldn’t be a conventional biography, but instead it had to be an ensemble piece.

“His career encapsulated the heart of the scene,” he said.

Behind the scenes, producers, arrangers and songwriters created the music, but the mob held much of the power. The singers and musicians were largely interchangeable and mostly underpaid.

Berns was born in the Bronx, the son of Ukrainian Jewish immigrants. His parents owned a dress shop on the Grand Concourse next door to Loew’s Paradise Theater. He grew up around the corner, on Creston Avenue, and spent summers at Grossinger’s in the Catskills.

At 14, he contracted rheumatic fever. His doctor said he’d live to be 21. Berns adopted the adage, “Live fast, die young and leave a good looking corpse.”

Selvin has spent 16 years writing a biography on Berns.  Photo: Jim Marshall

Selvin has spent 16 years writing a biography on Berns.
Photo: Jim Marshall

Selvin was still a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle when he started researching Berns. He realized there was a common thread throughout his music—a dark sense of urgency. When he found out about the heart problem, Selvin realized that it was linked to the despair embedded throughout his music.

“Berns was writing his own pathology,” he said. His heart was a ticking time bomb. He died in 1967, at age 38.

Selvin spent time in the Bronx, walking around the Grand Concourse, during his research. “It’s changed a lot, but you can peel back those spaces,” he said.

He also talked to retired FBI investigators and read FBI files. Starting with Alan Freed—the disc jockey who made the word “payola” a household word, Selvin documents the mob’s influence in modern music.

“The history of rhythm and blues is a happy-faced picture of teenagers writing songs for other teenagers,” he said. “That’s ignored the pervasive existence of the Mafia in the field.”

He met two of Berns’ children several years ago. He spent a long night with Brett Berns, staying up until 4 a.m. Brett’s father died when he was three, and he hadn’t heard many of the old 45’s that Selvin had collected over the years.

“But he did know stuff about his father’s life. So I played him a lot of records he’d never heard and we talked a long time,” Selvin said. “He told me about the gangsters. That was pretty much the night that I realized that this thing was going to make a great book.”

Berns’ life will also be the focus of a new Off-Broadway musical.

Berns’ life will also be the focus of a new Off-Broadway musical.

The Berns children are now mounting a musical based on their father’s life, Piece of My Heart, set to begin previews this June. A documentary featuring Paul McCartney (who now owns the publishing rights to most of Berns’s music) is also in the works.

“Piece of My Heart” is probably the quintessential Bert Berns song. A few months before his death, with his symptoms growing worse, he came up with the line, “Take it, take another little piece of my heart.”

He brought the lyric to co-songwriter Jerry Rogovoy and they finished the song together. Berns offered the song to Van Morrison, who turned it down. They later recorded it with Erma Franklin, Aretha’s sister.

“It’s his last record,” said Selvin. “He couldn’t possibly have had that line in his head without connections to his own life. When you hear that it comes from the songwriter’s pathology, it changes it completely.”

“Piece of my Heart” was also recorded by Dusty Springfield and was a huge hit for Janis Joplin.

But Selvin thinks Franklin’s recording is the definitive version.

“Janis just over sings it,” he said. “She was the Mariah Carey of her time.”

Berns del Bronx

Historia por Sherry Mazzocchi

“[Berns] was a songwriter who liked to push his singers to the edge of despair,” says biographer Joel Selvin.

“[Berns] era un compositor al que le gustaba empujar a sus cantantes al borde de la desesperación”, dice el biógrafo Joel Selvin.

Burt Berns amaba la música, probablemente más que cualquier otra cosa. Creció en el Bronx en los años 1940 y 1950. Iba a la Tremont Terrace, más tarde llamada el Trocadero, para escuchar Mambo.

Se pasaba noches enteras en la pista de baile, moviéndose al compás de la música de Machito, Tito Puente y Arsenio Rodríguez.

Al incorporar ritmos afrocubanos al rhythm and blues, Berns se convirtió en uno de los más influyentes compositores y productores de la década de 1960, resplandeciendo a través de la década con una serie de éxitos, incluyendo, “Twist and Shout”; “Here Comes the Night”; “Hang on Sloopy” y “Piece of my Heart.” Hizo las carreras tempranas de los cantantes Solomon Burke, Ben E. King, The Exciters, Isley Brothers, Van Morrison y Neil Diamond.

“Él era un compositor al que le gustaba empujar a sus cantantes al borde de la desesperación, justo en el abismo del corazón rompiéndose”, dijo el biógrafo Joel Selvin. “Obviamente, tenía una vida interior oscura que mantenía oculta, filtrándose en pequeños momentos”.

A pesar de que Berns trabajó con los titanes de la industria musical Jerry Wexler y Ahmet Ertegun, su nombre ha sido casi olvidado, en gran parte porque se hizo enemigo de los hombres poderosos.

Pero eso está por cambiar. Berns es objeto de una nueva biografía, un musical fuera de Broadway y un próximo documental.

Selvin pasó 16 años escribiendo Here Comes the Night: The Dark Soul of Bert Berns and the Dirty Business of Rhythm and Blues. El “Mickey Spillane” del periodismo del rock se dio cuenta rápidamente de que la historia de Berns no podía ser una biografía convencional, sino una obra en conjunto.

Berns’ life will also be the focus of a new Off-Broadway musical.

La vida de Berns también será presentada en un musical.

“Su carrera encapsula el corazón de la escena”, dijo.

Detrás del escenario, productores, arreglistas y compositores creaban la música, pero la mafia mantenía gran parte del poder. Los cantantes y músicos eran en gran parte intercambiables y en su mayoría mal pagados.

Berns nació en el Bronx, hijo de inmigrantes judíos ucranianos. Sus padres eran propietarios de una tienda de ropa en  Grand Concourse, junto al Paradise Theater de Loew. Se crió a la vuelta de la esquina en avenida Creston y pasaba los veranos en Grossinger, en Catskills.

A los 14 años contrajo fiebre reumática. Su médico dijo que viviría hasta los 21. Berns adoptó el adagio, “vive rápido, muere joven y deja un cuerpo bien parecido”.

Selvin todavía era un periodista del San Francisco Chronicle cuando comenzó a investigar a Berns. Se dio cuenta de que había un hilo conductor a través de su música, un oscuro sentido de urgencia. Cuando se enteró del problema del corazón, Selvin comprendió que estaba vinculado a la desesperación incrustada en toda su música.

“Berns estaba escribiendo su propia patología”, dijo. Su corazón era una bomba de tiempo. Murió en 1967, a los 38 años.

Selvin pasó un tiempo en el Bronx, caminando alrededor de Grand Concourse, durante su investigación. “Ha cambiado mucho, pero puedes quitar esos espacios”, dijo.

“Todo el mundo piensa en el Bronx en sus términos actuales, pero no reconocen el lugar maravilloso, feliz, que fue durante la infancia de Berns”.

Songwriter, producer and Bronx native Burt Berns admired, among others, Latin jazz musicians Machito and Tito Puente.

El compositor y productor Burt Berns admiro, entre otros, a los músicos Machito y Tito Puente.

También habló con investigadores retirados del FBI y leyó los archivos. Comenzando con Alan Freed, el disc jockey que hizo de la palabra “payola” una palabra familiar, Selvin documenta la influencia de la mafia en la música moderna.

“La historia del rhythm and blues es una imagen de cara feliz con adolescentes escribiendo canciones para otros adolescentes”, dijo. “Eso ha ignorado la existencia dominante de la mafia en el ámbito”.

Conoció a dos de los hijos de Berns hace varios años. Pasó una larga noche con Brett Berns, quedándose hasta las cuatro de la mañana. El padre de Brett murió cuando él tenía tres años. No había oído muchos de los viejos 45s que Selvin ha recopilado a través de los años.

Selvin has spent 16 years writing a biography on Berns. Photo: Jim Marshall

Selvin ha pasado 16 años escribiendo la biografía de Berns.
Foto: Jim Marshall

“Pero él sabía cosas sobre la vida de su padre, así que le puse un montón de discos de los que nunca había escuchado y conversamos mucho tiempo”, dijo Selvin. “Me habló de los gángsters. Esa fue prácticamente la noche en la que di cuenta de que este iba a ser un gran libro”.

Los chicos Berns están montando un musical basado en la vida de su padre, Piece of My Heart, cuyas pre visualizaciones  están programadas para comenzar este mes de junio. Un documental que presenta a Paul McCartney (quien ahora es dueño de los derechos de publicación de la mayor parte de la música de Berns) también está en planificación.

“Piece of My Heart” es probablemente la canción por excelencia de Bert Berns. Unos meses antes de su muerte, con sus síntomas empeorando, se le ocurre la línea, “Take it, take another little piece of my heart.”

Él lleva la letra al co-compositor Jerry Rogovoy y la terminan juntos. Berns le ofrece la canción a Van Morrison, quien la rechaza. Graban con Erma Franklin, hermana de Aretha.

“Es su último disco”, dijo Selvin. “Él no pudo haber tenido esa línea en la cabeza sin conexiones con su propia vida. Cuando escuchas que se trata de la patología del compositor, la cambia por completo”.

“Piece of my Heart” también fue grabada por Dusty Springfield y fue un gran éxito para Janis Joplin. Selvin piensa que la grabación de Franklin es la versión definitiva.

“Janis sólo  la canta”, dijo. “Ella fue la Mariah Carey de su tiempo”.