State of Emergency at NYCHA
Estado de emergencia en NYCHA

  • English
  • Español

State of Emergency at NYCHA

Announcement elicits raise and skepticism

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen and Desiree Johnson

Vera Fields spent Easter weekend without heat.

“I haven’t had heat since Friday,” said Fields. She has lived at the Taft Houses in East Harlem for over 50 years – and it’s far from the first time that the heat has failed.

Governor Andrew Cuomo (center) signed the order in East Harlem. Photo: Office of the Governor

Governor Andrew Cuomo (center) signed the order in East Harlem.
Photo: Office of the Governor

She noted that this past winter was particularly “lousy” due to the faulty boilers in her complex.

Fields is one of more than 400,000 residents of the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), the country’s largest public housing system, who stands to be impacted by the executive order signed by Governor Andrew Cuomo declaring a state of emergency this past Mon., Apr. 2nd.

The order aims to expedite badly needed repairs and address health hazards such as lead paint and mold.

The order provides for an independent monitor to conduct oversight of the housing authority, as well as an independent contractor to oversee repairs.

Cuomo had made three visits to NYCHA developments in recent weeks, where he labeled living conditions “deplorable” and “disgusting.”

“You go tour these NYCHA facilities and you tell me it’s safe, clean, decent housing. It’s an embarrassment to this people of this city and the people of this country, and all we had to do was expose it,” Cuomo said during a press conference held at the Johnson Houses.

As he had previously mentioned during a visit to a Bronx NYCHA complex, Cuomo said he is providing an additional $250 million to the housing authority, which has been worked into the new state budget for 2019.

“Political posturing” was how resident Felicia Gordon labeled the event.

“Political posturing” was how resident
Felicia Gordon labeled the event.

Including prior commitments which the state had not released to the city, the total allocation is $550 million to assist NYCHA.

The executive order calls for the City Council and the President of the NYCHA Citywide Council of Presidents (CCOP) to unanimously select an independent monitor within 60 days.

Once chosen, the manager must select an independent contractor within 30 days.

Cuomo said the contractor would have design-build authority and would not be subject to NYCHA procurement regulations. “As soon as that independent contractor is selected, the state will release all $550 million that remains to that independent contractor to do the work on day one. And that money is going to make a difference,” he stated.

Among those in attendance were Congressman Adriano Espaillat; Assemblymember Félix Ortiz; Public Advocate Letitia James; City Comptroller Scott Stringer; and Councilmembers Corey Johnson, Ritchie Torres, Robert Cornegy and Alicka Ampry-Samuel.

“We’re removing all of the bureaucracy, we’re removing all of the obstacles, and we’re responding the the needs of residents,” said James. “To me, this is personal.”

Over 400,000 residents live in citywide NYCHA housing.

Over 400,000 residents live in citywide NYCHA
housing.

Danny Barber, head of the CCOP, referred to Cuomo as his “new buddy,” and expressed gratitude for his help.

“Thank you for being a man of your word,” Barber said. “Thank you for assisting the residents of public housing when it really counted and we needed the help.”

“Every public housing resident deserves to live in habitable housing that provides them with respect and dignity,” said City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, who helped conduct an oversight hearing of NYCHA at the Council. He pointed out that the agency had underreported the number of tenants affected by heat and hot water outages this past winter.

Milagros Laviera, a resident of NYCHA’s Washington Houses since 1959, said she was pleased that repairs would finally be made. She said her bathroom ceiling has been collapsing since November due to water leaks.

“The walls, the ceiling, are coming down,” said Laviera. “I have to keep spraying around with Lysol, because the smell is so bad.”

“This is a good thing, if they go forth with what they’re saying,” she said of the provisions in Cuomo’s executive order.

“Every public housing resident deserves to live with respect,” said Council Speaker Corey Johnson. Photo: Office of the Governor

“Every public housing resident deserves to live
with respect,” said Council Speaker Corey
Johnson.
Photo: Office of the Governor

Another resident of the Taft Houses, Mahfuzur Rahman, said residents there are living in decrepit conditions.

“There are rats, paint is falling, there is bad ventilation and the pavements are not ADA-compliant and are hard to walk on,” he said.

Rahman expressed optimism that new state funding would bring about improvements.

“A new private school is being built, and there are capital projects in the building under construction,” he said. “I hope they finish them and keep going.”

As the Chair of the Health, Human Services, Immigration and Seniors Committee for Community Board 11, Rahman said he is aware of past occurrences when the Board would approach NYCHA with the tenants’ complaints and ask for changes to be done.

“But it takes a governor to make change,” he opined.

City Comptroller Scott Stringer said his office has audited NYCHA nine times in the last four years, which has uncovered issues such as broken and missing windows, financial mismanagement and maintenance backlog of 55,000 repairs

Milagros Laviera said her bathroom ceiling has been collapsing since November.

Milagros Laviera said her bathroom ceiling has
been collapsing since November.

“We showed in an audit that it takes an average of 370 days, more than a year, to fix safety violations mandated by the Fire Department, Department of Buildings, and Department of Health and Mental Hygiene,” said Stringer.

He said the executive order would ensure that NYCHA’s long-standing issues will not continue to linger.

“No longer are these issues going to get passed along from administration to administration,” he said.

América Paniagua, a resident of Holmes Towers, would concur.

She said that repairs in her building take a long time to be completed.

“They give me a ticket but they don’t do anything,” she said, referring to the requests made to NYCHA.

Not all NYCHA tenants were pleased.

Carmen Quiñones, President of the Douglas Houses Tenant Association, said Cuomo should have given more residents and tenant leaders the spotlight at the press conference.

Comptroller Scott Stringer said his office has audited NYCHA nine times in the last four years. Photo: Office of the Governor

Comptroller Scott Stringer said his office has
audited NYCHA nine times in the last four
years.
Photo: Office of the Governor

“We the leaders that are down on the ground, we got this done,” said Quiñones. “I appreciate the Governor. I appreciate that he came to our aid. But I think that a lot of the leadership and residents should have got more recognition than they did.”

Felicia Gordon of the Rafael Hernández Houses expressed concern that the event was a display of “political posturing,” and pointed out that a large portion of the money allocated by Cuomo was first promised years ago.

“Him announcing today that he’s given us something that he’s withheld, while people have been living in the cold, living with mold, it seems a bit hypocritical, in my opinion,” said Gordon.

Quiñones stated that NYCHA tenants should have a say in choosing the independent contractor.
“We did the groundwork. We have to be included,” she remarked. “It’s only right.”

Estado de emergencia en NYCHA

Anuncio provoca dudas y escepticismo

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen y Desiree Johnson

Congressman Adriano Espaillat.

El congresista Adriano Espaillat.

Vera Fields pasó el fin de semana de Pascua sin calefacción.

“No he tenido calefacción desde el viernes”, dijo Fields. Ella ha vivido en las Casas Taft en East Harlem por más de 50 años, y está lejos de ser la primera vez que la calefacción ha fallado.

Ella notó que este invierno pasado fue particularmente “malo” debido a las calderas defectuosas en su complejo.

Fields es una de más de 400,000 residentes de la Autoridad de Vivienda de Ciudad de Nueva York (NYCHA, por sus siglas en inglés), el sistema de vivienda pública más grande del país, que se verá afectado por la orden ejecutiva firmada por el gobernador AndrewCuomo declarando un estado de emergencia el pasado lunes 2 de abril.

La orden tiene como objetivo agilizar las reparaciones que se necesitan con urgencia y abordar los riesgos para la salud, como la pintura con plomo y el moho.

La orden provee un monitor independiente para supervisar a la autoridad de vivienda, así como un contratista independiente para supervisar las reparaciones.

Vera Fields has lived in NYCHA housing for over 50 years.

Vera Fields ha habitado en
viviendas de NYCHA por más
de 50 años.

Cuomo realizó tres visitas a desarrollos de NYCHA en las últimas semanas, donde calificó las condiciones de vida como “deplorables” y “repugnantes”.

“Visiten estas instalaciones de NYCHA y díganme si son viviendas seguras, limpias y decentes. Es una vergüenza para la gente de esta ciudad de este país, y todo lo que tuvimos que hacer fue exponerlo”, dijo Cuomo durante una conferencia de prensa celebrada en las Casas Johnson.

Tal como lo mencionó anteriormente durante una visita al complejo NYCHA del Bronx, Cuomo dijo que proporcionará $250 millones de dólares adicionales a la autoridad de vivienda, lo que se ha trabajado en el nuevo presupuesto estatal para 2019.

Incluyendo compromisos previos, el estado ha asignado un total de $550 millones de dólares para ayudar a NYCHA.

La orden ejecutiva exige que el Concejo Municipal y el presidente del Consejo de Presidentes de la Ciudad de NYCHA (CCOP, por sus siglas en inglés) seleccionen por unanimidad a un monitor independiente dentro de 60 días.

Una vez elegido, el gerente debe seleccionar a un contratista independiente dentro de 30 días.

“It's an embarrassment to this people of this city and the people of this country," Cuomo said.

“Es una vergüenza para la gente de esta ciudad y
de este país”, dijo Cuomo.

Cuomo dijo que el contratista tendría la autoridad de diseño y construcción y que no estaría sujeto a las regulaciones de adquisiciones de NYCHA. “Tan pronto como se seleccione a ese contratista independiente, el estado liberará los $550 millones de dólares que le quedan a ese contratista independiente para hacer el trabajo el primer día. Y ese dinero va a hacer la diferencia”, afirmó.

Entre los asistentes se encontraba el congresista Adriano Espaillat; el asambleísta Félix Ortiz; la defensora pública Letitia James; el contralor de la Ciudad Scott Stringer; y los concejales Corey Johnson, Ritchie Torres, Robert Cornegy y Alicka Ampry-Samuel.

“Estamos eliminando toda la burocracia, todos los obstáculos, y estamos respondiendo a las necesidades de los residentes”, dijo James. “Para mí, esto es personal”.

Danny Barber, presidente del CCOP, se refirió a Cuomo como su “nuevo amigo” y expresó gratitud por su ayuda.

América Paniagua said that repairs take a long time to be completed. 

“Las paredes, el techo, se están cayendo”, dijo América Paniagua.

“Gracias por ser un hombre de palabra”, dijo Barber. “Gracias por ayudar a los residentes de las viviendas públicas cuando realmente importaba y necesitábamos la ayuda”.

Danny Barber is President of the NYCHA Citywide Council of Presidents (CCOP).

Danny Barber es presidente del Consejo de
presidentes de la ciudad de NYCHA (CCOP,
por sus siglas en inglés).

“Todos los residentes de viviendas públicas merecen viviendas habitables que les brinden respeto y dignidad”, dijo el presidente del Concejo Municipal, Corey Johnson, quien ayudó a conducir una audiencia de supervisión de NYCHA en el Concejo. Destacó que la agencia informó una cantidad menor de inquilinos afectados por los cortes de calefacción y de agua caliente el invierno pasado.

América Paniagua, residente de las Casas Washington de NYCHA desde 1959, dijo estar contenta de que finalmente se hicieran las reparaciones. Explicó que el techo de su baño se ha derrumbado desde noviembre debido a filtraciones de agua.

“Las paredes, el techo, se están cayendo”, dijo Paniagua. “Tengo que rociar constantemente con Lysol porque el olor es terrible”.

“Esto es algo bueno, si avanzan con lo que están diciendo”, dijo sobre las disposiciones de la orden ejecutiva de Cuomo.

Mahfuzur Rahman, habitante de las Casas Taft, dijo que los residentes viven en condiciones decrépitas.

Taft Houses resident Mahfuzur Rahman said tenants there are living in decrepit conditions.

Mahfuzur Rahman, residente de
Casas Taft, dijo que los inquilinos
viven en condiciones ruinosas.

“Hay ratas, la pintura se está cayendo, hay mala ventilación y las aceras no cumplen con la ADA y son difíciles de pisar”, dijo.

Rahman expresó su optimismo de que los nuevos fondos estatales produzcan mejoras.

“Se está construyendo una nueva escuela privada y hay proyectos de capital en el edificio en construcción”, dijo. “Espero que los terminen y sigan”.

Como presidente del Comité de Salud, Servicios Humanos, Inmigración y Personas Mayores de la Junta Comunitaria 11, Rahman dijo que está al tanto de los sucesos pasados cuando la Junta se acercaba a NYCHA con las quejas de los inquilinos y pedía que se hicieran cambios.

“Pero hace falta un gobernador para hacer cambios”, opinó.

El contralor de la Ciudad, Scott Stringer, dijo que su oficina ha auditado a NYCHA nueve veces en los últimos cuatro años, lo cual ha descubierto problemas como ventanas rotas y faltantes, mala administración financiera y trabajos atrasados de 55,000 reparaciones de mantenimiento.

“Mostramos en una auditoría que toma un promedio de 370 días, más de un año, reparar las violaciones de seguridad ordenadas por el Departamento de Bomberos, el Departamento de Edificios y el Departamento de Salud e Higiene Mental”, dijo Stringer.

Dijo que la orden ejecutiva garantizaría que los problemas de larga data de NYCHA no se prolonguen.

“Ya no se pasarán estos problemas de administración a administración”, dijo.

“We have to be included,” said Carmen Quiñones, President of the Douglas Houses Tenant Association.

“Tenemos que ser incluidos”, dijo Carmen
Quiñones, presidenta de la Asociación de
Inquilinos de las Casas Douglas.

Pero no todos los inquilinos de NYCHA estaban satisfechos.

Carmen Quiñones, presidenta de la Asociación de Inquilinos de las Casas Douglas, dijo que Cuomo debería haber dado más atención a residentes y líderes de inquilinos en la conferencia de prensa.

“Nosotros, los líderes que estamos en el terreno, logramos esto”, dijo Quiñones. “Agradezco al gobernador, agradezco que viniera en nuestra ayuda, pero creo que gran parte del liderazgo y los residentes deberían haber obtenido más reconocimiento”.

Felicia Gordon, de las Casas Rafael Hernández, expresó su preocupación de que el evento fuera una muestra de “postura política” y señaló que una gran parte del dinero asignado por Cuomo fue prometió por primera vez hace años.

“Al anunciar hoy que nos ha dado algo que él ha retenido, mientras que la gente ha estado viviendo en el frío y con moho, parece un poco hipócrita, en mi opinión”, dijo Gordon.

Quiñones declaró que los inquilinos de NYCHA deberían tener voz y voto en la elección del contratista independiente.

“Hicimos el trabajo preliminar. Tenemos que ser incluidos”, comentó. “Es lo correcto”.