Special at Sydelle
Especial en Sydelle

  • English
  • Español

Special at Sydelle 

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

The site is located on East 181st Street.

The site is located on East 181st Street.

It was the bathtub that did it for Laverne Rogers.

Rogers had been living in a shelter for over two years before moving ‎in 2011 to the Lenninger, a Center for Urban Community Services‎ (CUCS) supportive housing site located on East 179th Street.

Rogers, who said she suffers from mental illness and a physical disability, explained that the CUCS facility offered her support services she could not find elsewhere, as well as a more comfortable standard of living.

“When I was in the shelter, I shared a room with four women, and shared a bathroom and a stand-up shower,” remarked Rogers. “When I was first shown my apartment at the Lenninger, the first thing I saw was I had my own bathtub.”

After that, she knew she was in the right place.

“I didn’t need to see anything else,” she recalled.

Rogers joined with state and city officials on Mon., Jun. 6th, to celebrate the opening of the Sydelle, another CUCS supportive housing residence at 600 East 181st Street.

The $40 million project provides 107 apartments and on-site support services for homeless, low-income and special-needs residents, including those with complex psychiatric and medical issues.

The project provides 107 apartments and on-site support services.

The project provides 107 apartments and on-site support services.

New Yorkers with special needs face constant challenges, including medical issues and finding a job, said Vicki Been, Commissioner of the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD).

“One of the challenges they shouldn’t have to face is they shouldn’t have to worry about where they’re going to lay their heads every night,” Been said. “This building will eliminate that worry for [many] families.”

The Sydelle is run by the CUCS, which serves more than 50,000 New Yorkers with housing, mental health and medical services.

Resident Laverne Rogers.

Resident Laverne Rogers.

About 60 percent of Sydelle residents are formerly homeless individuals from the city’s shelter system, said CUCS President and Chief Executive Officer Tony Hannigan, while the rest are low-income tenants who acquired their units through a housing lottery.

The building features studio, one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments.

“You could imagine that for those who have been in the shelter system, sometimes for years on end, to be able to have a big three-bedroom apartment, that’s pretty special,” said Hannigan.

Apartments earmarked for tenants from city shelters come completely furnished.

All of the units have been claimed, and eight families have moved in so far, Hannigan said. The other residents will be moved in over the next several weeks.

The building is named in recognition of Sydelle and Henry Ostberg of the Ostberg Foundation, which has provided ongoing support to CUCS, added Hannigan.

Gary Belkin, Deputy Executive Director of the city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, said that Rogers’ experience was an example of what supportive housing “provides in terms of dignity and opportunity and what’s going to be offered to many people here.”

Vicki Been is the city’s HPD Commissioner.

Vicki Been is the city’s HPD Commissioner.

The Sydelle also features an outdoor patio, gymnasium, laundry facilities, roof deck and bike racks.

The project took seven years to complete, and faced numerous obstacles, said Hannigan.

“This was built on five different lots, which had several different owners,” he said.

Dr. Anne Sullivan, Commissioner of the New York State Office of Health and Mental Hygiene, said that the state has created over 7,500 units of supportive housing over the last five years, with another 7,000 in development.

She admired the high-quality aesthetics of the Sydelle.

“It’s really special,” said Sullivan. “It’s a space that treats residents with a lot of dignity. They have a home that looks like everyone else’s.”

The Sydelle will offer residents a host of on-site support services, including crisis intervention, case management, legal support and employment assistance.

Psychiatric services and primary medical care will also be provided at an on-site medical suite.

“They say it takes a village to raise a child, but sometimes adults need help too,” remarked Samuel D. Roberts, Commissioner of the New York State Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance.

“The Governor realizes that supportive housing is one of the most important things that you can do to help homelessness in New York City,” added Roberts, who said the state contributed $3.8 million to the project. “The long-term, positive effects that it will have on the tenants are so important.”

Rogers spoke of the wrap-around services she is receiving at the Lenninger, and said it would be life-changing for Sydelle residents to have a similar experience.

“I started having psychiatric services on site,” Rogers said. “For years, I was living in fear with anxiety. Now my anxiety is under control. And I was able to create a resume, which I hadn’t done in years, and I was filling out job applications with confidence.”

CUCS President and Chief Executive Officer Tony Hannigan.

CUCS President and Chief Executive Officer Tony Hannigan.

Rogers said she was hired to work at the U.S. Open and was promoted to supervisor.

“I was able to meet Michelle Obama there,” she said.

Hannigan explained that the Sydelle was constructed with attractive-looking wall sconces, lighting, flooring, so the residence would not look like low-income housing.

“The greatest expense is not in the finishes and the features, but that’s what people see, and that’s really important,” Hannigan said.

“This is a truly a place where people can call home,” Been said. “It motivates all of us to do the work that we do to build beautiful buildings such as this.”

For more information on the Center for Urban Community Services, please visit www.cucs.org or call 212.801.3300.

 

Especial en Sydelle 

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

Gary Belkin es el director ejecutivo adjunto del Departamento de Higiene y Salud Mental de la ciudad.

Gary Belkin es el director ejecutivo adjunto del Departamento de Higiene y Salud Mental de la ciudad.

Fue la bañera la que lo hizo por Laverne Rogers.

Rogers estuvo viviendo en un refugio durante más de dos años antes de mudarse en 2011 al Lenninger, un sitio de vivienda de apoyo del Centro de Servicios Comunitarios Urbanos (CUCS por sus siglas en inglés) situado en la calle 179 este.

Rogers, quien dijo que sufre de una enfermedad mental y una discapacidad física, explicó que la instalación CUCS le ofreció servicios de apoyo que no podía encontrar en otros lugares, así como un nivel más cómodo de vida.

“Cuando estaba en el refugio, compartía una habitación con cuatro mujeres y compartía un baño y una regadera”, comentó Rogers. “Cuando se me mostró mi apartamento en Lenninger por primera vez, lo primera que vi fue que tendría mi propia bañera. No necesitaba ver nada más”.

Funcionarios estatales y municipales se reunieron en el Bronx el lunes 6 de junio para celebrar la apertura de Sydelle, otra residencia de vivienda de apoyo de CUCS en el No. 600 de la calle 181 este.

La inversión de $40 millones de dólares ofrece 107 apartamentos y servicios de apoyo in situ para residentes sin hogar, de bajos ingresos y con necesidades especiales, incluidas las personas con problemas psiquiátricos y médicos complejos.

Los neoyorquinos con necesidades especiales enfrentan desafíos constantes, incluyendo cuestiones médicas y encontrar un trabajo, dijo Vicki Been, comisionada del Departamento de Preservación y Desarrollo de la Vivienda (HPD por sus siglas en inglés) de la ciudad de Nueva York.

“Uno de los desafíos que no deberían tener que enfrentar es preocuparse sobre dónde van a poner sus cabezas cada noche”, Been dijo. “Este edificio eliminará esa preocupación para [muchas] familias”.

Sydelle es administrado por el CUCS, que sirve a más de 50,000 neoyorquinos con servicios médicos, de vivienda y de salud mental.

Alrededor del 60 por ciento de los residentes de Sydelle son personas anteriormente sin hogar del sistema de refugios de la ciudad, dijo el presidente y director general de CUCS, Tony Hannigan, mientras que el resto son inquilinos de bajos ingresos que adquirieron sus unidades a través de un sorteo de viviendas.

Laura Mascuch es la directora ejecutiva de ‘Supportive Housing Network of NY’.

Laura Mascuch es la directora ejecutiva de ‘Supportive Housing Network of NY’.

El edificio cuenta con estudios y apartamentos de uno, dos y tres dormitorios. “Puede imaginar que para aquellos que han estado en el sistema de refugios, a veces durante años y años, el poder tener un gran apartamento de tres habitaciones, es bastante especial”, dijo Hannigan.

Los apartamentos destinados a inquilinos de refugios de la ciudad vienen completamente amueblados.

Todas las unidades han sido reclamadas y ocho familias se han mudado hasta el momento, dijo Hannigan. Los otros residentes se mudarán en las siguientes semanas.

El edificio fue nombrado en reconocimiento a Sydelle y Henry Ostberg de la Fundación Ostberg, que ha proporcionado un apoyo constante a CUCS, agregó Hannigan. Gary Belkin, director ejecutivo adjunto del Departamento de Higiene y Salud Mental de la ciudad, dijo que la experiencia de Rogers fue un ejemplo de lo que la vivienda de apoyo “ofrece en términos de dignidad y oportunidad y lo que va a ofrecer a tantas personas aquí”.

El Sydelle también dispone de un patio al aire libre, gimnasio, lavandería, terraza y porta bicicletas.

El proyecto tardó siete años en completarse y enfrentó numerosos obstáculos, dijo Hannigan.

“Este fue construido en cinco lotes diferentes, que tenían varios propietarios distintos”, dijo.

Nuevas instalaciones.

Nuevas instalaciones.

La Dra. Anne Sullivan, comisionado de la Oficina de Higiene y Salud Mental del estado de Nueva York, dijo que el estado ha creado más de 7,500 unidades de vivienda de apoyo en los últimos cinco años, con otras 7,000 en desarrollo.

Admiró la estética de alta calidad de Sydelle.

“Es muy especial”, dijo Sullivan. “Es un espacio que trata a los residentes con mucha dignidad. Tienen una casa que se parece a todas las demás”.

“Es muy especial”, dijo la Dra. Anne Sullivan, comisionado de la Oficina de Higiene y Salud Mental del estado de Nueva York.

“Es muy especial”, dijo la Dra. Anne Sullivan, comisionado de la Oficina de Higiene y Salud Mental del estado de Nueva York.

Sydelle ofrecerá a los residentes varios servicios de apoyo en el lugar, incluyendo intervención de crisis, manejo de casos, apoyo legal y asistencia para el empleo.

También proporcionara servicios psiquiátricos y atención médica primaria en una suite médica in situ.

“Dicen que se necesita un pueblo para criar a un niño, pero a veces los adultos también necesitan ayuda”, comentó Samuel D. Roberts, comisionado de la Oficina de Asistencia Temporal y Discapacidad del estado de Nueva York.

“El gobernador nota que la vivienda de apoyo es una de las cosas más importantes que se pueden hacer para ayudar a las personas sin hogar en la ciudad de Nueva York”, agregó Roberts, quien dijo que el estado aportó $3.8 millones de dólares para el proyecto. “A largo plazo, los efectos positivos que tendrá sobre los inquilinos serán muy importantes”.

Rogers habló de los servicios integrales que recibe en Lenninger, y dijo que sería un cambio de vida que los residentes Sydelle tengan una experiencia similar.

“Empecé a recibir servicios psiquiátricos”, dijo Rogers. “Durante años viví con miedo a la ansiedad. Ahora mi ansiedad está bajo control y pude hacer un curriculum vitae, que no había hecho en años, y llené solicitudes de empleo con seguridad”.

Rogers dijo que fue contratado para trabajar en el Abierto de Estados Unidos y fue ascendido a supervisor.

“Pude conocer a Michelle Obama ahí”, dijo.

Sydelle y Henry Ostberg de la Fundación Ostberg. Foto: cucs.org

Sydelle y Henry Ostberg de la Fundación Ostberg.
Foto: cucs.org

Hannigan explicó que el Sydelle fue construido con apliques de la pared, iluminación y suelos de aspecto atractivo, de modo que la residencia no pareciera vivienda de interés social.

“El mayor gasto no está en los acabados y las características, pero eso es lo que la gente ve y es muy importante”, dijo Hannigan.

“Este es realmente un lugar al que la gente puede llamar su hogar”, Been dijo. “Nos motiva a todos para seguir haciendo nuestro trabajo y construir hermosos edificios como este”.

Para mas informacion sobre el Centro de Servicios Comunitarios Urbanos (CUCS por sus siglas en inglés), favor visite www.cucs.org o llame al 212.801.3300.