Rocking the docs
Exhibiendo documentales

  • English
  • Español

Rocking the docs

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

Los cineastas participaron en un programa patrocinado por NeON Arts y el Centro Documental Maysles.

The filmmakers participated in a program sponsored by NeON Arts and the Maysles Documentary Center.

Lenno Carter smiled broadly as the house lights went back up at the Maysles Documentary Center in Harlem.

The Bronx resident had just finished presenting a short documentary that he filmed.

“I feel like an official documentarian,” he remarked.

Carter is not a professional filmmaker, however.

At least not yet.

He had just completed a free, 12-week filmmaking course in the South Bronx, sponsored by NeON Arts and taught at the Maysles Documentary Center.

NeON Arts, a project of the NYC Department of Probation, offers young people in New York City, including those on probation, the chance to explore the arts through projects such as music, poetry, dance and visual arts.

Throughout the intensive filmmaking course, 11 participants from the South Bronx NeON (Neighborhood Opportunity Network) office, where people meet where their probation officers, received a crash course in the basics of documentary filmmaking, were provided cameras to film a subject of their choice and taught to use editing equipment to create the final piece.

NeON Arts ofrece a los jóvenes la oportunidad de explorar las artes.

NeON Arts offers young people the chance to explore the arts.

The project, conducted in partnership with Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute, produced four original short films.

On Sat., Nov. 15th, the filmmakers gathered to screen them in Harlem, presenting works that fit under the topic “Films for Change.”

“The goal was to create short documentaries to make the audience think,” said Napoleon Felipe, who collaborated with fellow participant Jonathan Olivo to create a film about the impact of technology on human relationships.

“Our film shows that while technology makes communication easier in many ways, it can also create a barrier to human interaction, since people spend so much time on their smartphones,” said Felipe.

Other short films focused on spirituality, the effect of domestic violence on families, and the career of Brooklyn-born comedian Ricky Barrino.

In the first part of the Barrino documentary, the comedian spoke emotionally of his time in prison, where he said he realized what he was meant to do in life.

El comediante Ricky Barrino (a la izquierda) fue el tema la película documental de Lenno Carter.

The comedian Ricky Barrino (left) was the subject of Lenno Carter’s documentary film.

“I realized that it was my calling to become a comedian and make people laugh,” said Barrino. “One of the best gifts God gave us is laughter.”

Carter, who filmed the piece on Barrino, said he was thrilled to learn the nuts and bolts of making a documentary.

“You start learning the tricks of the trade,” said Carter.  “And you start feeling like a real professional.”

Carter and Barrino stated that they are looking forward to taking the film class again, which will be offered starting on November 24.

“This is a wonderful thing for the community, and I’m really grateful I got to do this,” commented Barrino.

For the 12-week class, participants could make a film on any topic they wanted, said Stefani Saintonge, an educator at the Maysles Documentary Center.

“We gave them their own cameras to use during the project, and they filmed everything themselves, on their own schedule,” said Saintonge.

Maysles-Cinema-logoweb“They really had a lot of freedom.”

“It’s a very hands-on program right from the start,” explained Christine Peng, Education Director at the Maysles Documentary Center. “From day one, they’re using a camera.”

The ages of the participants spanned from 18 to 70.

“It was a diverse group, so we had an incredible range of opinions and personalities,” said Peng.

At the start of the filmmaking course at the Bronx NeON location, participants immediately began practice-filming, interviewing each other as well as probation officers before setting out to film on their own.

For the last few weeks, participants hunkered down at the Maysles Center to work on editing their film.

Ricky Barrino y Lenno Carter comparten el momento con el sobrino de Barrino (en púrpura), Kaleb, de 7 años, y el hijo de Carter, Taliq, de 7 años.

Ricky Barrino and Lenno Carter share the moment with Barrino’s nephew (in purple) Kaleb, 7, and Carter’s son Taliq, 7.

Peng said that the Maysles Center also offers a Junior Filmmakers class on Saturdays, where children 10 to 13 years old can learn the basics of filmmaking and create their own documentary.

Carter’s son Taliq, 10, is currently a student in the children’s class.

“It’s a lot of fun,” remarked Taliq.  “And you get to use different kinds of equipment.”

The Bronx NeON office also sponsors a weekly poetry workshop, titled Free Verse, that many of the filmmaking students also take part in.

“I think it’s empowering for people to have these opportunities,” remarked Peng.

“These are great creative outlets for them.”

Those who created the short films said they were grateful for the chance to express themselves.

Los estudiantes de cinematografía (de izquierda a derecha) Napoleón Felipe, Tiffany Marrero y Jonathan Olivo.

Filmmaking students (from left to right) Napoleon Felipe, Tiffany Marrero and Jonathan Olivo.

Felipe, an avid film buff prior to taking the class, said the program inspired him to want a career as a filmmaker.

“It made me understand what I want to do with my life,” he stated. “It had a profound effect on me.”

Unlike Felipe, participant Tiffany Marrero admitted she had no real interest in filmmaking prior to the workshop.

“I was more intrigued by working with other people than I was in the process itself, to be honest,” she said. “But once I took the class I was hooked, and I can’t wait to take another one.”

Marrero said that the class instilled her with discipline, as a considerable amount of work went into creating the finished product.

“Also, it teaches you how to work well with people, who are going to have different viewpoints,” she said. “It’s like making a soup — you have all these different ingredients, but if you blend them together correctly, it comes out great in the end.”

A new filmmaking program will begin on November 24 at South Bronx NeON, 198 East 161st Street, Bronx, NY 10451.  

For details, please contact Maysles Education at 212.537.6843.

To learn about education programs at Maysles Documentary Center, visit www.maysles.org/mdc/education/.

For more information on NeON, go to www.nyc.gov/html/prob/html/neon/neon.shtml.

 

Exhibiendo documentales

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

Los cineastas participaron en un programa patrocinado por NeON Arts y el Centro Documental Maysles.

Los cineastas participaron en un programa patrocinado por NeON Arts y el Centro Documental Maysles.

Lenno Carter sonreía ampliamente mientras las luces se encendían en el Centro Documental Maysles en Harlem.

El residente del Bronx acababa de terminar la presentación de un corto documental que filmó.

“Me siento como un documentalista oficial”, remarcó.

Aunque Carter no es un cineasta profesional.

Por lo menos no todavía.

Él acaba de terminar un curso gratuito de cine de 12 semanas en el sur del Bronx, patrocinado por NeON Arts e impartido en el Centro Documental Maysles.

NeON Arts, un proyecto del Departamento de Libertad Condicional de Nueva York, ofrece a los jóvenes de la ciudad, incluyendo a aquellos en libertad condicional, la oportunidad de explorar las artes a través de proyectos de música, poesía, danza y artes visuales.

A lo largo del curso intensivo de cine, 11 participantes de la oficina de NeON (Red de Oportunidades del Barrio) del sur del Bronx, donde la gente se reúne con sus oficiales de libertad condicional, recibieron un curso intensivo de los conceptos básicos para la realización de documentales. Se les proporcionaron cámaras para filmar un tema de su elección y les enseñaron a utilizar el equipo de edición para crear la pieza final.

NeON Arts ofrece a los jóvenes la oportunidad de explorar las artes.

NeON Arts ofrece a los jóvenes la oportunidad de explorar las artes.

El proyecto, dirigido en colaboración con el Instituto Weill de Música de Carnegie Hall, produjo cuatro cortometrajes originales.

El sábado 15 de noviembre los realizadores se reunieron para proyectarlos en Harlem, presentando las obras que caen bajo el tema “Películas por el cambio”.

“El objetivo fue crear documentales cortos para hacer que el público piense”, dijo Napoleón Felipe, quien colaboró con el también participante Jonathan Olivo para crear una película sobre el impacto de la tecnología en las relaciones humanas.

“Nuestra película muestra que si bien la tecnología hace más fácil la comunicación de muchas maneras, también puede crear una barrera para la interacción humana, ya que las personas pasan mucho tiempo en sus teléfonos inteligentes”, dijo Felipe.

Otros cortometrajes se centraron en la espiritualidad, en el efecto de la violencia doméstica en las familias y la carrera del comediante nacido en Brooklyn, Ricky Barrino.

En la primera parte del documental de Barrino, el comediante habló con emoción sobre su tiempo en la cárcel, donde dijo que se dio cuenta de lo que estaba destinado a hacer en la vida.

El comediante Ricky Barrino (a la izquierda) fue el tema la película documental de Lenno Carter.

El comediante Ricky Barrino (a la izquierda) fue el tema la película documental de Lenno Carter.

“Me di cuenta de que era mi vocación convertirme un comediante y hacer reír a la gente”, dijo Barrino. “Uno de los mejores regalos que Dios nos dio es la risa”.

Carter, quien filmó la pieza sobre Barrino, dijo que estaba encantado de conocer los secretos de hacer un documental.

“Empiezas aprendiendo los trucos del oficio”, dijo Carter. “Y comienzas a sentirte como un verdadero profesional”.

Carter y Barrino declararon que esperan tomar la clase de cine de nuevo, la cual se ofrecerá a partir del 24 de noviembre.

“Es una cosa maravillosa para la comunidad y estoy muy agradecido de haber podido hacerlo”, comentó Barrino.

En la clase de 12 semanas los participantes pueden hacer una película sobre cualquier tema que deseen, dijo Stefani Saintonge, educadora en el Centro Documental Maysles.

“Les dimos sus propias cámaras para que las utilizaran durante el proyecto y filmaron todo por sí mismos, en su propio horario”, explicó Saintonge. “Realmente tuvieron mucha libertad”.

“Es un programa muy práctico desde el principio”, explicó Christine Peng, directora de educación en el Centro Documental Maysles. “Desde el primer día están usando una cámara”.

Maysles-Cinema-logowebLas edades de los participantes van de los 18 a los 70 años.

“Fue un grupo diverso, así que tuvimos una increíble gama de opiniones y personalidades”, dijo Peng.

Al inicio del curso de cinematografía en la ubicación del Bronx de NeON, los participantes comenzaron inmediatamente a practicar su filmación, entrevistándose entre ellos y a los oficiales de libertad condicional antes de salir a grabar por su propia cuenta.

Desde hace unas semanas los participantes se atrincheraron en el Centro Maysles para trabajar en la edición de su película.

Peng dijo que el Centro Maysles también ofrece una clase junior para cineastas los sábados, donde los niños de entre 10 y 13 años de edad pueden aprender los conceptos básicos de la cinematografía y crear su propio documental.

Ricky Barrino y Lenno Carter comparten el momento con el sobrino de Barrino (en púrpura), Kaleb, de 7 años, y el hijo de Carter, Taliq, de 7 años.

Ricky Barrino y Lenno Carter comparten el momento con el sobrino de Barrino (en púrpura), Kaleb, de 7 años, y el hijo de Carter, Taliq, de 7 años.

El hijo de Carter Taliq, de 10 años, es actualmente un estudiante en la clase para niños.

“Es muy divertido”, comentó Taliq. “Y puedes utilizar diferentes tipos de equipos”.

La oficina del Bronx de NeON también patrocina un taller de poesía semanal, titulado Free Verse, que muchos de los estudiantes de cinematografía también toman.

“Creo que es muy positivo para las personas el tener estas oportunidades”, comentó Peng.

“Estas son las grandes salidas creativas para ellos”.

Quienes crearon los cortometrajes dijeron que estaban agradecidos por la oportunidad de expresarse.

Felipe, un ávido fanático del cine antes de tomar la clase, dijo que el programa le inspiró a desear una carrera como cineasta.

“Me hizo entender lo que quiero hacer con mi vida”, afirmó. “Tuvo un profundo efecto en mí”.

Los estudiantes de cinematografía (de izquierda a derecha) Napoleón Felipe, Tiffany Marrero y Jonathan Olivo.

Los estudiantes de cinematografía (de izquierda a derecha) Napoleón Felipe, Tiffany Marrero y Jonathan Olivo.

A diferencia de Felipe, la participante Tiffany Marrero admitió que no tenía ningún interés real en el cine antes del taller.

“Para ser honesta, estaba más intrigada por trabajar con otras personas de lo que estaba en el propio proceso”, señaló. “Pero una vez que tomé la clase me enganché y no puedo esperar para tomar otra”.

Marrero dijo que la clase le inculcó disciplina, ya que fue necesaria una cantidad considerable de trabajo para crear el producto final.

“Además, te enseña cómo trabajar bien con la gente que tiene diferentes puntos de vista”, dijo. “Es como hacer una sopa: tienes todos estos ingredientes diferentes, pero si son mezclados correctamente, sale muy bien al final”.

Un nuevo programa de cinematografía comenzará el 24 de noviembre en NeON del sur del Bronx, ubicado en el 198 de la calle 161 este, en el Bronx, NY 10451. Para obtener más información, por favor póngase en contacto con Maysles Education en el 212.537.6843.

Para conocer más sobre los programas educativos del Centro Documental Maysles, por favor visite www.maysles.org/mdc/education/.

Para más información sobre NeON, visite www.nyc.gov/html/prob/html/neon/neon.shtml.