Plugged in for power
Enchufados por una razón

  • English
  • Español

Plugged in for power

Story by Gregg McQueen

Bring it on.

A group of Bronx elementary school students are becoming more physically fit, while helping provide essential food to malnourished kids in the process.

P.S. 307 students are monitoring their physical activity with fitness armbands.

P.S. 307 students are monitoring their physical activity with fitness armbands.

Through a month-long health initiative known as UNICEF Kid Power, students at P.S. 307 in Kingsbridge are monitoring their physical activity with special fitness armbands that display the number of steps they’ve taken each day.

For every 12,000 steps — considered a full day of physical activity — the students earn points that are converted into monetary donations toward the purchase of therapeutic food, which is used to feed children in other countries who are suffering from severe acute malnutrition, a deadly condition if left untreated.

“It’s important [they] know that they’re part of a global community,” explained teacher Michelle Maturen.

“It’s important [they] know that they’re part of a global community,” explained teacher Michelle Maturen.

“Malnutrition is responsible for over a third of all deaths of children under the age of five globally,” said Caryl M. Stern, President and Chief Executive Officer of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF. “By putting children first, we believe we can reach a day when no child dies of a cause we know how to prevent.”

P.S. 307 teacher Michelle Maturen, also the school’s UNICEF coordinator, said that 190 students in grades three through five are involved in the Kid Power program there.

Caryl M. Stern is President and Chief Executive Officer of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF.

Caryl M. Stern is President and Chief Executive Officer of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF.

“It’s important for these kids to know that they’re part of a global community,” explained Maturen.

“Young children don’t always think outside of themselves, and this has focused them on the importance of being good citizens.”

UNICEF Kid Power is sponsored by the George Harrison Fund for UNICEF, which was established to provide assistance to children, including nutrition and emergency relief.

Launched in early March, the 30-day Kid Power program has engaged more than 4,000 kids throughout New York City, while also being conducted in Boston and Dallas.

Every five points that participants earn through their activity armband translates to one packet of Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food (RUTF), a specially-designed, vitamin-rich peanut paste that is used to save the lives of starving children.

“The kids get so excited in gym class, because they know that their exercise is helping people,” said Maturen.

P.S. 307 kids monitor their progress through a real-time online leaderboard, where they view how many RUTF packets they’ve unlocked as individuals and as a class, as well as their contributions to the city’s total.

An example of the vitamin-rich peanut paste.

An example of the vitamin-rich peanut paste.

The armband itself provides constant audio updates when students have reached point milestones.

“Every time the bracelet buzzes, the kids get a huge smile on their face,” remarked Maturen.

Since the program started, P.S. 307 children have secured more than 1,200 food packets by taking more than 16 million steps.

UNICEF distributes RUTF packets in dozens of countries around the world, including Haiti, Madagascar, Indonesia and Mauritania.

190 students are involved in the program at P.S. 307.

190 students are involved in the program at P.S. 307.

Packets can be delivered in a matter of weeks after being earned by Kid Power participants, said a UNICEF spokesperson.

Kid Power’s recent three-city unveiling followed a four-week pilot program held October 2014 in Sacramento, CA, which included nearly 900 students, teachers and teaching assistants.

Students engaged in the pilot were found to be 55 percent more physically active, and earned enough therapeutic food packets to feed 473 severely malnourished children.

“I can’t think of a better motivator for kids to get active than the fact that they’re helping save lives,” said Stern.

Maturen said her students have received an eye-opening lesson on the struggles of some children around the globe.

The program also incorporates classroom lessons and fitness activities.

The program also incorporates classroom lessons and fitness activities.

“It’s shocking to many of them when they learn that kids in other parts of the world don’t have access to clean water, or any food to eat,” she explained. “Even though many Bronx kids live in poor neighborhoods themselves, there are people elsewhere in even worse situations, who can’t acquire the most basic resources.”

The Kid Power program, which also incorporates classroom lessons and fitness activities, is expected to launch in additional cities starting in late 2015.

“My kids feel that they’re part of something really important,” said Maturen. “It’s amazing that by taking a routine step, they’re actually making a difference in the world.”

For more information on UNICEF Kid Power, visit www.unicefkidpower.org.

Enchufados por una razón 

Historia por Gregg McQueen

Un grupo de estudiantes de escuela primaria del Bronx está en mejor condición física cada vez, mientras ayuda a proporcionar alimentos esenciales a niños desnutridos en el proceso.

The program also incorporates classroom lessons and fitness activities.

El programa también incluye lecciones en el aula y actividades de acondicionamiento físico.

A través de una iniciativa de salud de un mes conocida como UNICEF Kid Power, estudiantes de la escuela pública 307 en Kingsbridge están monitoreando su actividad física con brazaletes especiales de acondicionamiento físico que muestran el número de pasos que dan cada día.

Por cada 12 000 pasos -considerados como un día lleno de actividad física- los estudiantes ganan puntos que se convierten en donaciones monetarias para comprar alimento terapéutico para alimentar a niños de otros países que sufren de desnutrición aguda severa, una enfermedad que puede ser mortal si no es tratada.

190 students are involved in the program at P.S. 307.

190 estudiantes participan en el programa Kid Power en la escuela pública 307.

“La desnutrición es responsable de más de un tercio de todas las muertes de niños menores de cinco años a nivel mundial”, dijo Caryl M. Stern, presidenta y directora general del Fondo de Estados Unidos de UNICEF. “Al poner a los niños en primer lugar, creemos que podremos ver un día en que ningún niño muera por una causa que sabemos cómo prevenir”.

Michelle Maturen, maestra de la escuela pública 307 y también coordinadora de UNICEF de la escuela, dijo que 190 estudiantes entre el grado tercero y el quinto participan en el programa Kid Power ahí.

“Es importante para estos niños saber que son parte de una comunidad global”, explicó Maturen. “Los niños pequeños no siempre piensan fuera de sí mismos y esto les ha enfocado en la importancia de ser buenos ciudadanos”.

UNICEF Kid Power es patrocinado por el Fondo Harrison George para UNICEF, que fue establecido para proporcionar apoyo a la niñez, incluyendo nutrición y ayuda de emergencia.

An example of the vitamin-rich peanut paste.

Un ejemplo de la pasta de cacahuete rica en vitaminas.

Lanzado a principios de marzo, el programa Kid Power de 30 días ha involucrado a más de 4,000 niños en toda la ciudad de Nueva York, al mismo tiempo que se lleva a cabo en Boston y Dallas.

Por cada cinco puntos que los participantes ganan a través de su brazalete de actividad, se traduce en un paquete de alimentos terapéuticos Ready-to-Use (RUTF por sus siglas en inglés), una pasta de cacahuete rica en vitaminas, de diseño especial, que se utiliza para salvar las vidas de los niños que mueren de hambre.

“Los niños se emocionan mucho en la clase de gimnasia porque saben que su ejercicio está ayudando a la gente”, dijo Maturen.

“It’s important [they] know that they’re part of a global community,” explained teacher Michelle Maturen.

“Es importante para estos niños saber que son parte de una comunidad global”, explicó la maestra Michelle Maturen.

Los niños de la escuela pública 307 monitorean su progreso a través de una clasificación en línea en tiempo real, donde ven cuántos paquetes RUTF han desbloqueado como individuos y como clase, así como sus contribuciones al total de la ciudad.

El brazalete ofrece actualizaciones constantes de audio cuando los estudiantes han alcanzado hitos puntuales.

“Cada vez que el brazalete suena, los niños ponen una enorme sonrisa en su cara”, comentó Maturen.

Caryl M. Stern is President and Chief Executive Officer of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF.

Caryl M. Stern es la presidenta y directora general del Fondo de Estados Unidos de UNICEF.

Desde que comenzó el programa, los niños de la escuela pública 307 han asegurado más de 1,200 paquetes de alimentos, danto más de 16 millones de pasos.

UNICEF distribuye los paquetes RUTF en decenas de países de todo el mundo, entre ellos Haití, Madagascar, Indonesia y Mauritania.

Los paquetes se pueden entregar en cuestión de semanas después de haber sido ganados por los participantes Kid Power, dijo un portavoz de UNICEF.

La inauguración de tres ciudades de Kid Power fue seguida por un programa piloto de cuatro semanas realizado en octubre de 2014 en Sacramento, CA, que incluyó a casi 900 estudiantes, maestros y asistentes de maestros.

Los estudiantes que participaron en el proyecto piloto resultaron ser un 55 por ciento más activos físicamente y ganaron suficientes paquetes de alimentos terapéuticos para alimentar a 473 niños con desnutrición severa.

“No puedo pensar en un mejor motivador para que los niños estén activos que el hecho de que están ayudando a salvar vidas”, dijo Stern.

P.S. 307 students are monitoring their physical activity with fitness armbands.

Los estudiantes de la escuela pública 307 están monitoreando su actividad física con brazaletes especiales.

Maturen dijo que sus estudiantes han recibido una lección reveladora sobre las luchas de algunos niños alrededor del mundo.

“Es impactante para muchos de ellos enterarse de que los niños de otras partes del mundo no tienen acceso a agua limpia o a ningún alimento”, explicó. “A pesar de que muchos niños del Bronx viven en barrios pobres, hay gente en otras partes en situaciones aún peores, que no pueden adquirir los recursos más básicos”.

Se espera que el programa Kid Power, que también incluye lecciones en el aula y actividades de acondicionamiento físico, sea lanzado en otras ciudades a finales de 2015.

“Mis hijos sienten que son parte de algo realmente importante”, dijo Maturen. “Es increíble que un paso a la vez, están haciendo una diferencia en el mundo”.

Para mayor información sobre Kid Power de UNICEF, visite www.unicefkidpower.org.