New funding aid for city immigrants

Nueva ayuda para inmigrantes de la ciudad

Nueva ayuda para inmigrantes de la ciudad

  • English
  • Español

New funding aid for city immigrants

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

President Barack Obama unveiled Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) last June.

The memorandum declared that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) would not deport certain undocumented youth who came as children and who could meet specific qualifications.

“Literacy is never a bad thing,” said Jeanne Mulgrav, Commissioner of the Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD).

“Literacy is never a bad thing,” said Jeanne Mulgrav, Commissioner of the Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD).

The announcement was met with a combination of excitement and trepidation by many whose lives would stand to be most affected by the change.

Despite numerous drives, workshops, and volunteer hours contributed by lawyers to help support young immigrants applying for DACA, the response to undocumented immigrants themselves has been tepid; of hundreds of thousands of young immigrants who qualified, only one fourth of those who qualified for DACA applied, said city officials at a press conference last week.

Experts point to the high cost of the application, which is $380 dollars, as well as anxiety about divulging personal and family information to United States Immigrant and Customs Enforcement (ICE), as factors that dissuade young immigrants from applying.

Additionally, aside from providing documentation proving their continual presence in the United States between June 15, 2007 and June 15, 2012, applicants also have to prove they were enrolled in some form of academic program.

In New York City, there are an estimated 79,000 people eligible to apply for DACA, but 16,000 of them must first enroll in an adult education program, according to Fatima Shama, New York City’s Commissioner of Immigration Affairs.

There are currently not enough slots for all those in need.

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn (center) and immigration advocates announced new funding that provides education and assistance with DACA applications.

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn (center) and immigration advocates announced new funding that provides education and assistance with DACA applications.

Many remain outside the education system because they dropped out of high school, leaving them few options to pursue their education.

This past Wed., July 17th, Shama, together with Jeanne Mulgrav, Commissioner of the Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD), Suri Duitch, University Dean for Continuing Education of City University of New York, Councilmember Robert Jackson and City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, announced that $18 million from the city’s 2014 and 2015 budgets will be allocated to the CUNY system and the DYCD for educational programs.

New York is the first city in the country making an investment of this scale to enable immigrants to take advantage of DACA, which will give them the ability to live and work legally in the United States, a measure backed by Councilmembers María del Carmen Arroyo and advocate organizations such as New York Immigration Coalition and Make the Road New York.

The funds will not only provide educational opportunities to an underserved population, but also help young immigrants apply for DACA.

Currently, there are only 6,000 seats available in CUNY’s adult education programs, but the funding will help an additional 14,000 New Yorkers over the course of two years. Though the classes are available to others in the city, those that qualify for DACA will be given priority.

“New York City is the city of opportunities,” said Javier Valdes, Co-Executive Director of Make the Road New York.

“New York City is the city of opportunities,” said Javier Valdes, Co-Executive Director of Make the Road New York.

The funds will also cover the cost of the DACA application.

The announcement comes in the midst of deliberation in Congress whether or not to pass the Senate’s immigration reform bill—which, in its current form, gives preferential treatment to immigrants who have been approved for DACA; instead of a 13-year path to citizenship, they will be given an 8-year path to citizenship.

But New Yorkers don’t want to wait for Congress.

“If we were complacent here in New York City, 16,000 people would be lost because of the budget,” said Councilmember Christine Quinn.

CUNY and the DYCD representatives underscored how they have been unable to help more immigrants get into programs due to a lack of space and funds.

“English classes at CUNY become enrolled to capacity within an hour,” said Duitch. “This investment will go a long way.”

“These individuals are going to have to prove that they’re assets,” noted Fatimah Shama, Commissioner of Immigrant Affairs.

“These individuals are going to have to prove that they’re assets,” noted Fatimah Shama, Commissioner of Immigrant Affairs.

Commissioner Mulgrav agreed. Whatever decision is made by Congress on immigration reform, education is always a prerogative, she said.

“Literacy is never a bad thing; it is always helpful,” said Mulgrav.

“Even if immigration reform passes, these individuals are going to have to prove that they’re assets,” as per the bill, added Shama.

In the meantime, DACA will help prevent deportations.

The announcement of the funding allocation was met with enthusiasm.

“When we ask immigrants why they come to New York City, they say it’s because New York City is the city of opportunities. This money shows that it really is,” said Javier Valdes, Co-Executive Director of Make the Road New York.

“This is going to uplift many generations,” said Councilmember Robert Jackson.

He also had a message for the media to get the word out.

“Do your job!” he implored.

For more information on accessing the resources to those interested in applying for DACA and additional assistance, residents are encouraged to visit the Office of Immigrant Affairs online at www.nyc.gov/html/imm.

In its first year, only 58% of those estimated eligible for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) have applied.

DACA offers a two-year renewable deferral of removal action and a grant of employment authorization to qualifying immigrants, brought to the United States as youths. In order to qualify, individuals must:

• Be under the age of 31 on June 15, 2012;

• Have come to the United States before the age of 16;

• Have continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007;

• Currently be in school, have graduated or obtained a GED, or have been honorably discharged from the U.S. Coast Guard or Armed Forces;

• Have not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor, or three or more other misdemeanors.

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) reports that 539,128 applications were received through May 2013. These applications account for approximately 58% of the 936,933 immigrants the Immigration Policy Center had estimated were immediately eligible for DACA. This low application rate has been attributed to the relatively high costs of the application process, concerns with the continuing political debate on immigration reform, and insufficient access to accurate legal advice.

Nueva ayuda para inmigrantes de la ciudad

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

El Presidente Barack Obama dio a conocer el programa de Acción Diferida para niños (DACA, por sus siglas en inglés) el pasado junio.

El memorandum del Presidente anunció que el Departamento de Seguridad Nacional de los E.U. (DHS, por sus siglas en inglés) no deportaría ciertos jóvenes indocumentados que llegaron aquí con sus padres y reúnen cualificaciones educativas específicas.

La Portavoz del Concejo Christine Quinn (centro), oficiales electos, organizaciones sin fines de lucro y agencias de la ciudad anunciaron la asignación de $18 millones para ayudar a los neoyorquinos a solicitar y calificar para DACA.

La Portavoz del Concejo Christine Quinn (centro), oficiales electos, organizaciones sin fines de lucro y agencias de la ciudad anunciaron la asignación de $18 millones para ayudar a los neoyorquinos a solicitar y calificar para DACA.

El anuncio fue recibido con una combinación de emoción y agitación por muchos cuyas vidas tendrían la posibilidad de ser más afectadas por el cambio.

A pesar de numerosas campañas, talleres y horas de trabajo voluntario de abogados para ayudar a apoyar a los jóvenes inmigrantes a solicitar DACA, la respuesta de los mismos indocumentados ha sido tibia; de cientos de miles de jóvenes inmigrantes calificados, solo una cuarta parte de estos que cualifican para DACA aplicaron, dijeron oficiales de la ciudad en una conferencia de prensa la semana pasada.

Expertos señalaron el alto costo de la aplicación, la cual es $380, como también la ansiedad acerca de divulgar información personal y familiar al Control de Inmigración y Aduana (ICE, por sus siglas en inglés), como factores que disuaden a los jóvenes inmigrantes para aplicar. Además, aparte de proveer documentación que acredite su continua presencia en los Estados Unidos entre el 15 de junio de 2007 y el 15 de junio de 2012, los solicitantes también tienen que probar que estaban inscritos en alguna clase de programa académico.

En la ciudad de Nueva York, hay un estimado de 79,000 personas elegibles para aplicar para DACA, pero 16,000 de ellos primero tienen que inscribirse en un programa de educación para adultos, según Fatimah Shama, Comisionada de Inmigración de la Ciudad de Nueva York.

Actualmente no hay suficientes espacios para todos aquellos en necesidad.

“Nueva York es la ciudad de las oportunidades”, dijo Javier Valdés, Director Co-Ejecutivo de ‘Make the Road New York’.

“Nueva York es la ciudad de las oportunidades”, dijo Javier Valdés, Director Co-Ejecutivo de ‘Make the Road New York’.

Muchos permanecen fuera del sistema de educación porque se salieron de la escuela superior, dejándoles pocas opciones para proseguir su educación.

Este pasado miércoles, 17 de junio, Shama, junto a Jeanne Mulgrav, Comisionada del Departamento de Jóvenes y Desarrollo Comunal (DYCD, por sus siglas en inglés), Suri Suitch, Decano de la Universidad de Educación Continua de la Universidad de la Ciudad de Nueva York, el Concejal Robert Jackson y la Portavoz del Concejo Christine Quinn, anunciaron que $18 millones del presupuesto de la ciudad para el 2014 y 2015 serán asignados al sistema CUNY y al DYCD para programas educativos.

Nueva York es la primera ciudad en el país en hacer una inversión de esta magnitud para permitir que los inmigrantes tomen ventaja de DACA, lo cual les brindará la habilidad de vivir y trabajar legalmente en los Estados Unidos, una medida respaldada por la Concejal María del Carmen Arroyo y organizaciones de apoyo tales como la Coalición de Inmigrante de Nueva York y ‘Make the Road New York’.

Los fondos no solo proveerán oportunidades educativas a una población marginada, sino también ayudará a jóvenes inmigrantes a solicitar DACA.

Actualmente, hay solo 6,000 asientos disponibles en los programas de educación para adultos de CUNY, pero los fondos ayudarán a unos 14,000 neoyorquinos adicionales en el transcurso de dos años. Aunque las clases están disponibles para otros en la ciudad, aquellos que califican para DACA tendrán prioridad.

Los fondos también cubrirán el costo de la solicitud de DACA.

“La alfabetización nunca es algo malo, siempre ayuda”, dijo Jeanne Mulgrav, Comisionada del Departamento de Jóvenes y Desarrollo Comunal.

“La alfabetización nunca es algo malo, siempre ayuda”, dijo Jeanne Mulgrav, Comisionada del Departamento de Jóvenes y Desarrollo Comunal.

El anuncio llega en medio de la deliberación en el Congreso de si aprobar o no el proyecto de reforma de inmigración del Senado – el cual en su forma actual, brinda un trato preferencial a inmigrantes que han sido aprobados para DACA; en lugar de un camino de 13 años hacia la ciudadanía, estarían dando un camino de 8 años para la ciudadanía.

Pero los neoyorquinos no quieren esperar por el Congreso.

“Si aquí en la ciudad de Nueva York fuéramos complacientes, 16,000 personas estarían perdidas debido al presupuesto”, dijo el miembro del Concejo Christine Quinn.

Representantes de CUNY y DYCD subrayaron como ellos han sido incapaces de ayudar a más inmigrantes a entrar a programas debido a la falta de espacio y fondos.

“Las clases de inglés en CUNY se llenan a capacidad en una hora”, dijo Suitch. “Esta inversión llegará muy lejos”.

“Estos individuos van a tener que probar que son valiosos activos”, dijo Comisionada de Inmigración de la Ciudad de Nueva York Fatimah Shah.

“Estos individuos van a tener que probar que son valiosos activos”, dijo Comisionada de Inmigración de la Ciudad de Nueva York Fatimah Shah.

La Comisionada Mulgrav estuvo de acuerdo.

Cualquiera sea la decisión del Congreso en la reforma de inmigración, la educación siempre es una prerrogativa”, dijo ella.

“La alfabetización nunca es algo malo, siempre ayuda”, dijo Mulgrav.

“Aun si la reforma emigratoria es aprobada, estos individuos van a tener que probar que son valiosos activos”, según la ley añadió Shama.

Mientras tanto, DACA ayudará a preveer las deportaciones.

El anuncio de la asignación de fondos fue recibido con entusiasmo.

“Cuando le preguntamos a los inmigrantes porque vinieron a la ciudad de Nueva York, dicen que es porque Nueva York es la ciudad de las oportunidades. Este dinero muestra que realmente lo es”, dijo Javier Valdés, Director Co-Ejecutivo de ‘Make the Road New York’.

“Esto va a mejorar a muchas generaciones”, dijo el Conejal Robert Jackson. También tuvo un mensaje para los medios de comunicación para que lo dijeran.

“Hagan su trabajo”, imploró.

Para más información de como obtener los recursos, aquellos interesados en solicitar para DACA y que necesiten asistencia adicional debieran visitar a la oficina de Asuntos de Inmigrantes en línea en www.nyc.gov/html/imm.

En su primer año, sólo el 58% de los elegibles estimados para la Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) han aplicado. DACA ofrece un aplazamiento de dos años renovable de la acción de remoción y una subvención de permiso de trabajo para inmigrantes calificados, traídos a los Estados Unidos siendo jóvenes. Para calificar, las personas deben:

• Tener menos de 31 años para el 15 de junio de 2012

• Haber llegado a los Estados Unidos antes de los 16 años

• Haber residido continuamente en los Estados Unidos desde el 15 de junio de 2007

• Actualmente estar estudiando, haberse graduado, haber obtenido su GED o haber sido dado de baja honorablemente de la Guardia Costera de Estados Unidos o de las Fuerzas Armadas

• No haber sido condenado por un delito grave, delito menor significativo, o tres o más delitos menores.

Los servicios de inmigración y ciudadanía de los Estados Unidos (USCIS por sus siglas en inglés) reportan que se recibieron 539,128 solicitudes hasta mayo de 2013. Estas aplicaciones representan aproximadamente el 58% de los 936,933 inmigrantes que el Centro de Política Migratoria había estimado que eran inmediatamente elegibles para DACA. Esta baja tasa de aplicación se ha atribuido a los relativamente altos costos del proceso de aplicación, las preocupaciones por el permanente debate político sobre la reforma migratoria y el acceso insuficiente a la asistencia jurídica precisa.