Making sense of making bank
Finanzas con sentido

  • English
  • Español

Making sense of making bank

Financial literacy forum held for teens

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

“This is the generation we want to educate on these issues,” said Assemblymember Marcos Crespo.

“This is the generation we want to educate on these issues,” said Assemblymember Marcos Crespo.

“I would have been so much better off,” said Julio Tejada.

Now a financial agent for State Farm, Tejada said he didn’t know the first thing about money when he immigrated to the U.S. from the Dominican Republic.

“If I [had only] known then what I know now about finances,” remarked Tejada. “I didn’t know how to save. Then I wondered why I had no money.”

Now Tejada travels around the city teaching young people budgeting and savings tips.

“If I can give them some building blocks at such a young age, they’ll be so far ahead of me once they reach my age,” he stated.

Tejada served as the keynote speaker for “Common Cents,” a financial literacy workshop for local high school students hosted by Assemblymember Marcos Crespo, State Farm and Catholic Charities.

Students from six high schools attended.

Students from six high schools attended.

The event, held at The Point Community Development Center in the South Bronx on March 17, gathered students from four high schools in the 85th Assembly District.

Attendees received a financial literacy presentation from Tejada, were able to apply to the city’s Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP) with a Catholic Charities representative, or learn about job assistance programs from the city’s Workforce 1 Career Centers.

“I really want to take advantage of learning this info at an early age,” said Beyoncé Dennis (left) with classmate Destiny Quiñones.

“I really want to take advantage of learning this info at an early age,” said Beyoncé Dennis (left) with classmate Destiny Quiñones.

Though Crespo had previously sponsored financial literacy seminars for the general public, he said it was the first time his office targeted students.

“This is exactly the population, the generation we want to educate on these issues, and hopefully getting them to make the right decisions early,” remarked Crespo. “It’s something that our community needs to do a better job with.”

“Kids at this age, there’s such a disconnect when it comes to money,” Tejada said. “They get a little money and they spend it right away. By the time they realize the value of money, I personally feel it’s too late, as they already have responsibilities. But if they start now saving a little now, it will definitely help them 15, 20 years down the line.”

Tejada’s biggest piece of financial advice to young people?

“They need to analyze needs versus wants,” he explained. “We all need a pair of sneakers, but do you really need a pair of Jordans that cost $500?”

Crespo recalled the allure of having his first line of credit a young age. On his first day of college, he signed up for a promotional credit card offer in order to get free baseball tickets and a beach towel.

He quickly ran through his $1,000 credit line, he said. Crespo added that he once missed an opportunity to buy an apartment because of his finances.

“I didn’t plan for the future the right way,” he said. “I feel like I missed a chance to have equity since I did not take my finances seriously.”

Tejada stressed to students that maintaining a good credit score is essential.

“If you mess up your credit, it can take seven to 10 years to fix it,” he remarked.

Financial agent Julio Tejada served as the keynote speaker.

Financial agent Julio Tejada served as the keynote speaker.

Using a pizza metaphor during his presentation, Tejada used a “slice of life” theme, with each slice representing a different piece of a monetary budget, like rent, car insurance and phone bills.

He showed students an example of a consumer who put about $40 a month into a savings account, which grew to over $15,000 over 15 years, including earned interest.

“These kids will start making some money soon, so understanding what to do with that money, how to spend it wisely and also put some aside for savings is important,” said Karyn Fagello, Public Affairs Manager for State Farm.

Fagello said that State Farm is looking to expand its financial literacy seminars throughout the Bronx in the coming months.

Ilse Fajardo, SYEP Director for Catholic Charities, urged students to pay attention to the advice being presented.

Ilse Fajardo, SYEP Director for Catholic Charities, urged students to heed the advice presented.

Ilse Fajardo, SYEP Director for Catholic Charities, urged students to heed the advice presented.

“When you have opportunity, you have two choices, either we take it and run with it or we ignore it,” she said. “There are a lot of kids out there who would like to be getting the info you’re getting right now. Maybe not everything you hear seems interesting to you at this age, but the information you get here is always going to be useful.”

High school senior Michael García noted that he was already aware of the importance of savings, but still appreciated having the concepts reinforced.

“They put it in terms that we can relate to,” García said.

Beyoncé Dennis, a student at the Bronx Studio School for Writers and Artists, reported that she found the workshop useful.

“I really want to take advantage of learning this info at an early age, and try to put it into practice,” Dennis said.

Her classmate Destiny Quiñones signed up for summer work through the SYEP.

“It would be my first real job,” she said. “Now I know the importance of saving some of what I earn.”

Crespo told students that when they have good financial health, they benefit not just themselves but the entire borough.

“In the Bronx, we’ve been a poor community for far too long,” he remarked. “As we fight to rebuild the Bronx, make sure that you can take advantage of it instead of somebody else.”

“We’ve seen successful Bronxites who feel that, in order to afford a certain quality of life, they have to leave the city,” he added. “We don’t want that. We want to have a Bronx that you can aspire to do great things in and then remain in the borough and keep that prosperity here.”

Finanzas con sentido

Foro de alfabetización financiera

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

“Yo habría estado mucho mejor”, dijo Julio Tejada.

Ahora un agente financiero de State Farm, Tejada dijo que no sabía nada sobre dinero cuando emigró a los Estados Unidos desde la República Dominicana.

The group said it planned to offer additional workshops.

El grupo dijo que planea ofrecer talleres adicionales.

“Si (tan solo) hubiera sabido lo que sé ahora sobre finanzas”, comentó Tejada. “No sabía cómo ahorrar. Me preguntaba por qué no tenía dinero”.

Ahora Tejada viaja por la ciudad enseñando a jóvenes a hacer presupuestos y les da consejos de ahorro.

“[Understanding] how to put some aside for savings is important,” said Karyn Fagello, Public Affairs Manager for State Farm.

“[Entender] cómo ahorrar es importante”, dijo Karyn Fagello, gerente de Asuntos Públicos de State Farm.

“Si puedo brindarles algunas bases a una edad tan temprana, estarán más adelantados cuando lleguen a mi edad”, afirmó.

Tejada fue el orador principal de “Common Cents”, un evento de alfabetización financiera para estudiantes locales de bachillerato, organizado por el asambleísta Marcos Crespo, State Farm y Caridades Católicas.

El evento, celebrado en el Centro de Desarrollo Comunitario The Point en el Sur del Bronx el 17 de marzo, reunió a estudiantes de seis bachilleratos del Distrito 85 de la Asamblea.

Los asistentes recibieron una presentación de alfabetización financiera de Tejada, pudieron aplicar al Programa de Empleo Juvenil de Verano de la Ciudad (SYEP, por sus siglas en inglés) con un representante de Caridades Católicas y aprendieron sobre los programas de asistencia laboral de los Centros de Carrera Wokforce 1 de la ciudad.

Aunque Crespo había patrocinado anteriormente seminarios de alfabetización financiera para el público en general, dijo que era la primera vez que su oficina se dirigía a los estudiantes.

“They put it in terms that we can relate to,” said Michael García.

“Lo pusieron en términos con los que podemos relacionarnos”, dijo Michael García.

“Esta es exactamente la población, la generación a la que queremos educar sobre estos temas, y esperamos lograr que tomen las decisiones correctas temprano”, comentó Crespo. “Es algo con lo que nuestra comunidad necesita hacer un mejor trabajo”.

“Entre los niños de esta edad existe una desconexión cuando se trata de dinero”, dijo Tejada. “Ellos reciben un poco de dinero y lo gastan enseguida. Para el momento en que se dan cuenta del valor del dinero, personalmente siento que es demasiado tarde, pues ya tienen responsabilidades. Pero si empiezan a ahorrar un poco ahora, sin duda les ayudará 15, 20 años más adelante”.

¿El mejor consejo financiero de Tejada para los jóvenes?

“Necesitan analizar las necesidades frente a los deseos”, explicó. “Todos necesitamos un par de tenis, pero ¿realmente necesitan un par de Jordans que cuestan $500 dólares?”.

Crespo recordó el encanto de tener su primera línea de crédito a una edad temprana. En su primer día de universidad, se inscribió en una oferta de tarjeta de crédito promocional con el fin de obtener boletos de béisbol gratis y una toalla de playa.

Rápidamente agotó su línea de crédito de $1,000 dólares, explicó. Crespo agregó que una vez perdió una oportunidad de comprar un apartamento debido a sus finanzas.

“No planeé el futuro de la manera correcta”, dijo. “Siento que perdí la oportunidad de tener un patrimonio pues no tomé mis finanzas en serio”.

Tejada subrayó a los estudiantes que mantener una buena puntuación de crédito es esencial.

“Si estropean su crédito, puede tomarles entre siete a 10 años arreglarlo”, comentó.

Ilse Fajardo, SYEP Director for Catholic Charities, urged students to heed the advice presented.

Ilse Fajardo, directora de SYEP de Caridades Católicas, instó a los estudiantes a prestar atención a los consejos brindados.

Usando una metáfora de la pizza durante su presentación, Tejada habló de las “rebanadas de la vida”, con cada rebanada representando una pieza diferente de un presupuesto monetario, como alquiler, seguro de coche y cuentas de teléfono.

Mostró a los estudiantes un ejemplo de un consumidor que puso cerca de $40 dólares mensuales en una cuenta de ahorros, que creció a $15,000 dólares tras 15 años, incluyendo intereses ganados.

“Estos niños empezarán a ganar algo de dinero pronto, así que entender qué hacer con ese dinero, cómo gastarlo sabiamente y también ahorrar un poco, es importante”, dijo Karyn Fagello, gerente de Asuntos Públicos de State Farm.

Fagello dijo que State Farm está buscando expandir sus seminarios de alfabetización financiera en todo el Bronx en los próximos meses.

Ilse Fajardo, directora de SYEP de Caridades Católicas, instó a los estudiantes a prestar atención a los consejos brindados.

“Cuando tienen una oportunidad, existen dos opciones: tomarla o ignorarla”, dijo. “Hay muchos chicos a los que les gustaría estar recibiendo esta información. Tal vez no todo lo que escuchan les parece interesante a esta edad, pero la información que reciban aquí les será útil siempre”.

Michael García, alumno de bachillerato, señaló que ya era consciente de la importancia del ahorro, pero agradecía poder reforzar los conceptos.

Financial agent Julio Tejada served as the keynote speaker.

El agente financiero Julio Tejada fue el orador principal.

“Lo pusieron en términos con los que podemos relacionarnos”, dijo.

Beyoncé Dennis, estudiante de la Escuela de Escritores y Artistas del Bronx, informó que consideró útil el seminario.

“Realmente quiero aprovechar haber conocido esta información a una edad temprana y tratar de ponerla en práctica”, comentó.

Su compañera Destiny Quiñones, se inscribió para el empleo de verano a través del SYEP.

“Sería mi primer trabajo real”, dijo. “Ahora sé la importancia de ahorrar algo de lo que gano”.

Crespo dijo a los estudiantes que cuando tienen buena salud financiera, se benefician no sólo a sí mismos, sino a todo el condado.

“En el Bronx, hemos sido una comunidad pobre durante demasiado tiempo”, comentó. “Mientras luchamos por reconstruir el Bronx, asegúrense de aprovecharlo en lugar de otra persona”.

“Hemos visto a exitosos bronxianos sentir que, para poder tener cierta calidad de vida, deben abandonar el condado”, añadió. “No queremos eso. Queremos tener un Bronx que pueda aspirar a hacer grandes cosas y luego permanecer en el condado y mantener esa prosperidad aquí”.