House and home
Casa y hogar

  • English
  • Español

The saga of Daisy Vargas

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

Daisy Vargas stood in front of her house in Castle Hill, just steps from the driveway. It was empty – and will likely remain that way for some time.

“They put us through the wringer,” said Daisy Vargas, with husband Samuel.

“They put us through the wringer,” said Daisy Vargas, with husband Samuel.

Vargas and her husband Samuel have had to sell their cars to pay off their bills.

Four generations of the Vargas family inhabit the house, and a year ago, another family moved in, allowing for an additional source of revenue.

Vargas’s son has had to drop out of college so he could get a full-time job as a police officer and help his family with the bills.

It might come as a surprise to some that Vargas, a payroll manager for the Batali and Bastianich Hospitality Group, co-owned by renowned chef Mario Batali, would be in such financial straits.

But even women with perfect credit can fall victim to the banks.

Vargas has spent nearly 3 ½ years grappling with HSBC Bank in what is called the “shadow docket”, a limbo in which homeowners are left languishing as they wait for their mandatory foreclosure conferences.

Every homeowner is entitled to a foreclosure conference with the bank to see if a deal can be made to avoid losing the home.

But the shadow docket is possible when banks cannot draw up an attorney affirmation that confirms that the bank’s (or banks’, if there are multiple banks involved, as is the case with the Vargas mortgage) documents are all legally sound. Only after the attorney affirmation is produced can a Right to Judicial Intervention (RJI) be sent to homeowners.

When a homeowner receives an RJI, they also receive valuable information on organizations that can give them legal and financial guidance.

Elected officials joined the Vargas family to advocate for the Certificate of Merit” bill, yet to be signed into law by Governor Cuomo.

Elected officials joined the Vargas family to advocate for the Certificate of Merit” bill, yet to be signed into law by Governor Cuomo.

Without the RJI, the conference cannot be scheduled.

If no conference ever happens, the bank cannot technically foreclose on a house, but instead can delay the process by placing homeowners in the shadow docket, which also allows banks to generate sizeable profits by increasing interest and fees.

As it stands now, Vargas owes HSBC over $60,000 of interest in fees accrued over the three years she was held in the shadow docket.

While she managed to save her house, as a direct result of the ordeal, Vargas now has no credit rating, something that is hard to cope with.

“I always told my son that your credit rating is your life. It opens doors for you.” Vargas purchased her house in 1995.

All was going well until her husband, a corrections officer, was attacked on the job at Riker’s Island in 2009.

After four surgeries, he was unable to work, and is currently on disability.

He currently receives only 50 percent of what his paycheck once was.

Forecasting financial woes ahead, but not in the red yet, Vargas applied for a modification on her monthly mortgage payments.

She sent in the application, and was told to wait three months for a response. In the meantime, Vargas kept up with her payments.

Three months later, the bank said they had not been able to get to Vargas’s application, and that she had to send in a new one.

In the meantime, the Vargas family sold many of their possessions, and her son dropped out of college to get a job and help the family make ends meet.

Four generations of the Vargas family, including Daisy’s mother, live in the home.

Four generations of the Vargas family, including Daisy’s mother, live in the home.

When HSBC finally offered a modification, it was to increase the family’s monthly payments.

The financial pressures mounted, and in the fall of 2009, Vargas was late making a payment.

As soon as funds were available, she went to pay her mortgage at her local banking center, but they refused to take her money.

Then she sent a certified check, which was also returned to her.

A week later, she got notification that the bank was going to foreclose on the house. “I freaked. I had only missed one payment,” Vargas recalled.

Though Vargas received a foreclosure notification, she did not receive any information about a foreclosure conference. Vargas and her husband mentally prepared for the worst.

“We thought it was going to be the last Thanksgiving, the last Christmas, the last everything [at the house],” said Vargas.

But HSBC kept the family in limbo for three years—legally unable to foreclose since there was never a foreclosure conference.

Meanwhile, the Vargas family stayed put.

Unable to make payments to the bank, they saved the would-be payments in the event that HSBC finally gave them a foreclosure conference.

How could HSBC kick them out if they presented all of their payments? they reasoned.

But as the Vargas family saved their money, the bank kept tacking on fees.

Finally, after calling several different outlets for help, Vargas’ husband called Legal Services of New York (LS-NYC).

The family shared their story.

Through the LS-NYC she learned that multiple investors, not just HSBC Bank, had invested on her home.

A foreclosure conference was finally arranged, and three attorneys from three different banks were present.

“The Certificate of Merit bill [will guarantee] every homeowner the right to a mortgage settlement conference as soon as a bank files a complaint,” said State Senator Jeff Klein.

“The Certificate of Merit bill [will guarantee] every homeowner the right to a mortgage settlement conference as soon as a bank files a complaint,” said State Senator Jeff Klein.

When Vargas came to the meeting with all the mortgage payments from the last three years, they did not know what to do.

The judge on the case told the lawyers present that if they didn’t have answer for the Vargas family, she would hold them in contempt.

Two weeks later, a different lawyer returned to the court, and gave Vargas the news that they would not foreclose on the house. What they did do, however, was tack on over $60,000 in interest and fees for the time the family spent on the shadow docket.

“I’m glad I have my home, but it’s a slap in the face,” Vargas said, shaking her head. “They put us through the wringer.”

Vargas spoke at length about her family’s ordeal this past Thurs., Jul. 25th, and about new legislation that may well prevent similar circumstances for other homeowners.

The legislation, known as the “Certificate of Merit” bill, would close the conference loophole, and protect every homeowner’s right to an in-person, court supervised settlement conference within 90 days of entering foreclosure

The Certificate of Merit bill, approved in the last legislative session by both the State Assembly and State Senate, would prevent banks from putting homeowners in the shadow docket by making them provide attorney affirmation up front, keeping the foreclosure conference from being delayed.

The legislation, however, still has to be signed into law by Governor Andrew Cuomo.

The bill would affect approximately 14,000 New York State residents and 7,000 New York City residents presently in the “shadow docket”. State Senator Jeffrey Klein and Assemblymember Helene Weinstein sponsored the bill, and were present, as was Bronx Borough President Rubén Díaz Jr., and New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman.

“It’s important that professionals and homeowners stay in the Bronx,” said Borough President Rubén Díaz, Jr.

“It’s important that professionals and homeowners stay in the Bronx,” said Borough President Rubén Díaz, Jr.

“Deliberately irresponsible behavior by big banks has forced roughly 7,000 New York City homeowners into the type of legal limbo that our laws were designed to prevent,” said Senator Klein, who, in 2009 authored the legislation that guaranteed homeowners a right to a settlement conference prior to court proceedings.“The Certificate of Merit bill will finally change all of that, by guaranteeing every homeowner the right to a mortgage settlement conference as soon as a bank files a complaint. But the real hero today is Ms. Vargas, who is doing everything she can to prevent other homeowners from being victimized.”

“There’s this image of the Bronx that people don’t own houses. It’s important to me that professionals and homeowners stay in the Bronx,” said the Borough President.

Attorney General Schneiderman was optimistic that some of the $60,000 in fees could be reduced.

“Never stop talking to lawyers or paralegals,” he advised Vargas. “There is very little that is more important than keeping people inside their homes.”

“I do not want to see another person face what I went through,” said Vargas, close to tears as she recounted her long battle.

“These are people’s lives, and banks have to held accountable for their actions,” said Justin Haines, Director of Foreclosure Prevention Unit at the Bronx Division of Legal Services NYC.

While Vargas gets her own life on track, she is glad for one thing other than her house.

“I’m glad something came out of my venting.”

BY THE NUMBERS

-92 homeowners enter the foreclosure shadow docket every day. The legislation (S.4530A/A.5582), known as the “Certificate of Merit” bill, would ensure every homeowner’s right to an in-person, court supervised settlement conference within 90 days of entering foreclosure.

-14,000 New York State homeowners are estimated to be in the shadow docket.

-Approximately 7,000 New York City homeowners are in the same.

-Daisy Vargas was in the docket, and legal limbo, for 3 ½ years.

-The interest fees amounted to close to $60,000, which were placed at the end of her mortgage loan as a balloon payment.

-Four generations of the Vargas family live in the house.

La saga de Daisy Vargas

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

Daisy Vargas se paró frente a su casa en Castle Hill, a pocos pasos de la entrada. Estaba vacía y probablemente se mantendrá así durante algún tiempo.

"Nos pusieron a través del escurridor", dijo Daisy Vargas, con su esposo Samuel.

“Nos pusieron a través del escurridor”, dijo Daisy Vargas, con su esposo Samuel.

Vargas y su esposo Samuel han tenido que vender el coche para pagar sus cuentas.

Cuatro generaciones de la familia Vargas habitaban la casa, y hace un año, otra familia se mudó para tener una fuente adicional de ingresos.

El hijo de Vargas ha tenido que abandonar la universidad para poder conseguir un trabajo a tiempo completo como oficial de policía y ayudar a su familia con los gastos.

Puede ser una sorpresa para algunos que Vargas, gerente de nómina del grupo Batali y Bastianich Hospitality, cuyo copropietario es el reconocido Chef Mario Batali, estaría en tales aprietos financieros.

Pero incluso las mujeres con crédito perfecto pueden ser víctima de los bancos.

Vargas ha pasado más de tres años lidiando con el banco HSBC en lo que se llama “shadow docket” una especie de limbo en el que los propietarios de viviendas quedan languideciendo mientras esperan sus reuniones de ejecución obligatorias.

Cada propietario tiene derecho a una reunión de ejecución o ‘foreclosure’ con el banco para ver si se puede llegar a un acuerdo para evitar la pérdida de la vivienda.

El shadow docket es posible cuando los bancos no pueden elaborar una afirmación de abogado en la que se confirma que los documentos del banco (o de los bancos, si hay varios involucrados, como es el caso de la hipoteca de Vargas) son legales. Sólo después de que se produce la afirmación del abogado puede ser enviado un Derecho a la Intervención Judicial (RJI por sus siglas en inglés) a los propietarios de las viviendas.

Cuando un propietario recibe un RJI, también recibe información valiosa sobre las organizaciones que les pueden dar asesoría legal y financiera.

Oficiales electos se unieron a la familia Vargas para apoyar el proyecto de ley "Certificate of Merit", que aún debe ser promulgado por el gobernador Andrew Cuomo.

Oficiales electos se unieron a la familia Vargas para apoyar el proyecto de ley “Certificate of Merit”, que aún debe ser promulgado por el gobernador Andrew Cuomo.

Sin el RJI, la reunión no se puede programar.

Si no hay reunión, el banco técnicamente no puede ejecutar la hipoteca de una casa, pero sí retrasar el proceso colocando a los propietarios de viviendas en el shadow docket, que también permite a los bancos generar beneficios considerables al aumentar los intereses y las comisiones.

Tal como está ahora, Vargas debe a HSBC más de $60,000 dólares de intereses de los honorarios devengados en los tres años que ella estuvo en el shadow docket.

Aunque se las arregló para salvar su casa, como un resultado directo de la difícil experiencia, Vargas ya no tiene historial de crédito, algo que es difícil de manejar.

“Siempre le dije a mi hijo que su calificación de crédito es su vida. Te abre las puertas”. Vargas compró su casa en 1995.

Todo iba bien hasta que su marido, agente de correccional, fue atacado en el trabajo en la isla Rikers en 2009.

Después de cuatro cirugías, él no podía trabajar y actualmente se encuentra discapacitado.

En la actualidad sólo recibe el 50 por ciento de lo que era su sueldo.

Previendo los problemas financieros que llegarían, pero que no estaban presentes todavía, Vargas solicitó una modificación en sus pagos mensuales de la hipoteca.

Ella envió la solicitud y se le dijo que esperara tres meses por la respuesta.

Cuatro generaciones de la familia Vargas, incluyendo a la madre de Daisy, vive en la casa.

Cuatro generaciones de la familia Vargas, incluyendo a la madre de Daisy, vive en la casa.

Mientras tanto, Vargas se mantuvo al día con sus pagos.

Tres meses más tarde, el banco dijo que no había sido capaz de llegar a la solicitud de de Vargas y que tenía que enviar una nueva.

Mientras tanto, la familia de Vargas vendió muchas de sus posesiones, y su hijo abandonó la universidad para conseguir un trabajo y ayudar a la familia a llegar al fin de mes.

Cuando HSBC finalmente ofreció una modificación, se produjo un aumento de sus pagos mensuales.

Las presiones financieras aumentaron y en el otoño de 2009 Vargas debía un pago.

Tan pronto como tuvo fondos disponibles, fue a pagar su hipoteca en el centro bancario local, pero se negaron a aceptar su dinero.

Entonces envió un cheque certificado, que también fue devuelto.

Una semana más tarde, recibió la notificación de que el banco ejecutaría la hipoteca de la casa.

“Me asusté. Yo sólo había dejado de hacer un pago”, recordó Vargas.

Aunque Vargas recibió una notificación de ejecución hipotecaria, no recibió ninguna información sobre una reunión de ejecución. Vargas y su esposo mentalmente se prepararon para lo peor.

“Pensamos que iba a ser el último día de acción de gracias, la última Navidad, el último todo [en la casa]”, dijo Vargas.

Pero HSBC mantuvo a la familia en el limbo tres años, legalmente incapaz de ejecutar la hipoteca, ya que nunca hubo una reunión de ejecución.

“El proyecto de ley "Certificate of Merit" [le garantiza] a los propietarios de viviendas sus derechos a una reunión de ejecución o ‘foreclosure’ con el banco”, explico el Senador Estatal Jeff Klein.

“El proyecto de ley “Certificate of Merit” [le garantiza] a los propietarios de viviendas sus derechos a una reunión de ejecución o ‘foreclosure’ con el banco”, explico el Senador Estatal Jeff Klein.

Mientras tanto, los Vargas se quedaron donde estaban.

Incapaces de hacer los pagos al banco, ahorraron los posibles pagos en el caso de que HSBC finalmente les diera una reunión de ejecución.

Cómo podría HSBC echarlos si presentaban la totalidad de sus pagos?, ellos pensaban.

Pero a medida que la familia Vargas ahorraba su dinero, el banco seguía cambiando las tasas.

Finalmente, después de llamar a varios medios diferentes para obtener ayuda, el esposo de Vargas llamó a Servicios Legales de Nueva York (LS-NYC).

La familia compartió su historia.

A través de esto se enteró de que varios inversores, no sólo el banco HSBC, habían invertido en su casa.

Una reunión de ejecución finalmente fue arreglada y tres abogados, de tres bancos diferentes, estaban presentes.

Cuando Vargas llegó a la reunión con todos los pagos de la hipoteca de los últimos tres años, no sabían qué hacer.

La juez del caso dijo a los abogados presentes que si no tenían respuesta para la familia Vargas, los mantendría en desacato.

Dos semanas más tarde, otro abogado regresó a la corte y dio a Vargas la noticia de que no iban a ejecutar la hipoteca de la casa.

"Es importante que los profesionales y propietarios de viviendas permanezcan en el Bronx", dijo el presidente del condado Rubén Díaz, Jr.

“Es importante que los profesionales y propietarios de viviendas permanezcan en el Bronx”, dijo el presidente del condado Rubén Díaz, Jr.

Lo que hicieron, sin embargo, fue añadir más de $60,000 dólares en intereses y comisiones por el momento que la familia pasó en el shadow docket.

“Me alegro de tener mi casa, pero es una bofetada en la cara”, dijo Vargas, sacudiendo la cabeza.

“Nos pusieron a través del escurridor”.

Vargas habló largo y tendido sobre la terrible experiencia de su familia este pasado jueves 25 de julio, y sobre la nueva legislación que también pueda evitar circunstancias similares para otros propietarios.

La legislación, conocida como el proyecto de ley “Certificate of Merit”, acabaría con el tecnicismo de las reuniones de ejecución y protegería el derecho de cada propietario a una reunión de conciliación cara a cara supervisada por la corte, dentro de los primeros 90 días después de entrar en ejecución hipotecaria.

El proyecto de ley “Certificate of Merit”, aprobado en la última sesión legislativa por la Asamblea Estatal y el Senado del Estado, podría evitar que los bancos pongan a los propietarios de viviendas en el shadow docket, haciéndolos dar una afirmación de abogado desde el principio, evitando así que la reunión de ejecución se retrase.

La legislación, sin embargo, todavía tiene que ser convertida en ley por el gobernador Andrew Cuomo.

La medida afectará a alrededor de 14,000 residentes del estado de Nueva York y 7,000 neoyorquinos.

El senador estatal Jeffrey Klein, y la asambleísta Helene Weinstein, quienes apoyaron el proyecto de ley, estuvieron presentes, al igual que el presidente del condado del Bronx, Rubén Díaz Jr., y el fiscal general del estado de Nueva York, Eric Schneiderman.

"Nunca dejes de hablar con los abogados o paralegales", aconsejo el Fiscal General Eric Schneiderman.

“Nunca dejes de hablar con los abogados o paralegales”, aconsejo el Fiscal General Eric Schneiderman.

“El comportamiento deliberadamente irresponsable de los grandes bancos ha obligado a cerca de 7,000 propietarios de viviendas de Nueva York a terminar en el tipo de limbo legal que nuestras leyes fueron diseñadas para prevenir”, dijo el Senador Klein, quien en 2009 fue autor de la ley que garantizaba a los propietarios el derecho a una reunión de conciliación antes de los procedimientos judiciales.

“Hay una imagen del Bronx de que la gente no tiene casas propias. Es importante para mí que los profesionales y propietarios de viviendas permanezcan en el Bronx “, dijo el presidente del condado.

El fiscal general Schneiderman se mostró optimista de que algunos de los $60,000 en honorarios puedan reducirse.

“Nunca dejes de hablar con los abogados o paralegales”, le aconsejó el fiscal a Vargas.

“Es muy poco lo que es más importante que mantener a la gente dentro de sus casas”.

“Yo no quiero que otra persona pase por lo que pasé”, dijo Vargas, cerca de las lágrimas, mientras recordaba su larga batalla.

“Estas son las vidas de las personas y los bancos tienen que rendir cuentas por sus acciones”, dijo Justin Haines, director de la unidad de prevención de ejecución hipotecaria en la división del Bronx de Servicios Legales NYC. Mientras Vargas logra retomar su vida, ella se alegra por otra cosa, además de su casa.

“Estoy contenta de algo que salió de lo que ventilé”.

POR LOS NUMEROS

-92 propietarios de viviendas entran en el ‘shadow docket’ cada día.

-La legislación (S.4530A/A.5582), conocida como el proyecto de ley “Certificate of Merit”, le garantizaría a cada propietario una reunión de ejecución o ‘foreclosure’ con el banco dentro de 90 días.

-Aproximadamente 14,000 propietarios de viviendas del estado de Nueva York York están en el “shadow docket.”

-Aproximadamente 7,000 propietarios de viviendas en la ciudad de Nueva York están en el mismo.

-Daisy Vargas estaba en el “docket” y en limbo por 3 años y medio.

-Vargas debe a HSBC más de $60,000 dólares de intereses de los honorarios devengados en los tres años que ella estuvo en el “shadow docket.”

-Cuatro generaciones de la familia Vargas viven en la casa.