“He was still a boy”

Madre de Ramarley Graham critica el juicio del NYPD

Madre de Ramarley Graham critica el juicio del NYPD

  • English
  • Español

“He was still a boy”

Ramarley Graham’s mother criticizes NYPD trial 

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

“My son was painted at this monster,” said Constance Malcolm.

“My son was painted at this monster,” said Constance Malcolm.

It’s not enough.

After the New York Police Department (NYPD) wrapped its long-awaited disciplinary trial for Officer Richard Haste, who shot and killed unarmed Bronx teen Ramarley Graham in 2012, Graham’s mother Constance Malcolm repeated her calls for the cop’s dismissal, and said the NYPD glossed over details of the shooting.

At a press conference on January 24, one day after closing arguments in the departmental trial, Malcolm expressed disappointment in the way the NYPD handled the hearing, and challenged the testimony of Haste, who stated that he did not realize any of Graham’s family members were in the apartment until after the shooting.

Malcolm said that Graham’s grandmother and younger brother were in the apartment at the time, and insisted Haste knew that as soon as he barged in the door.

“My son Chinnor was standing just feet away, at the time he was six years old, and watched this take place,” said Malcolm, who insisted that the grandmother, Patricia Hartley, was standing between Graham and Haste when the officer fired a single shot into Graham’s heart.

“Haste shot so fast, that his grandmother thought she was the one hit, and clutched her chest,” said Loyda Colón, a co-director of The Justice Committee, an anti-police violence advocacy group. “Then she saw Ramarley’s body on the floor.”

Ramarley Graham (here with a relative) was 18 years old when he was killed.

Ramarley Graham (here with a relative) was 18 years old when he was killed.

Colón added that Hartley was then threatened by Officer Haste, and “interrogated” by police for seven hours after the shooting.

Colón and Malcolm pointed to video footage, taken from outside the family’s East 229th Street home and played at Haste’s trial, as an indication that the NYPD failed to properly investigate the shooting. They noted that a gurney was quickly brought in to remove Graham’s body from the scene.

“They gave no time for any real investigation to go on, for the medical examiner to come and do what needed to be done, all because they wanted to cover up everything that happened,” Malcolm stated.

The family played new video footage, taken from behind the house, that depicted Haste standing calmly in the backyard before attempting to gain entry to the house.

The family argued that the video demonstrates that Haste was relaxed and understood Graham was not a threat.

During opening statements at the hearing, the prosecutor said that Haste used poor judgment and failed to employ proper tactics.

NYPD Officer Richard Haste is seen entering the Graham family home.

NYPD Officer Richard Haste is seen entering the Graham family home.

“The tactical failures of Police Officer Haste rest solely with him,” said Beth Douglas, a lawyer for the NYPD Department Advocate’s office, which prosecuted the case. “The tragic death of Ramarley Graham could have and should have been avoided.”

Haste’s attorney Stuart London, has argued that Haste is being made a scapegoat and that Graham’s refusal to obey orders to show his hands led to his death.

The 18-year-old Graham was killed in February 2012 after NYPD narcotics officers spotted him on the street in the Wakefield neighborhood, thought he might be armed after seeing him adjust his waistband, and followed him to his family’s home.

Colón and Malcolm also insisted that Graham was not selling drugs, and that police were watching a bodega on White Plain Road for suspected drug activity, not Graham himself.

“My son was painted at this monster that was selling drugs and was running and didn’t want to listen when the cop told him ‘stop,” said Malcolm. “None of that was true.”

Attorney Royce Russell insisted, “Confidence in this proceeding would have to be in the end result.”

Attorney Royce Russell insisted, “Confidence in this proceeding would have to be in the end result.”

“He was still a boy,” she added. “His life was cut short, all because someone was too hasty, broken protocol, and thinking they were above the law.”

A Bronx grand jury and the U.S. Attorney’s office have already declined to prosecute Haste, and an NYPD Firearm Discharge Review Board previously ruled the shooting justified.

Malcolm’s attorney Royce Russell said that viewing Haste’s tactics on the videos make it confounding that the officer did not face deeper discipline.

“I hate to think of conspiracy theories, but it’s almost impossible how you could not move forward with criminal charges,” said Russell.

Malcolm said that all officers involved in the incident should be removed.

“I want Commissioner [James] O’Neill to fire these men,” she stated. “They don’t belong in the NYPD. They don’t need to be carrying a gun.”

Malcolm voiced concern that Civil Rights Law Section 50-A might them from learning of any disciplinary action against Haste, as the NYPD has previously cited the law as justification for not disclosing outcomes of internal discipline cases.

However, on January 25, NYPD Deputy Commissioner Kevin Richardson advised that the Graham family would be notified of the disciplinary outcome for Haste, as would the general public.

Commissioner O’Neill has the authority to accept or reject the decision.

Commissioner O’Neill has the authority to accept or reject the decision.

“When there is a decision in the Richard Haste case, they will be informed,” Richardson said. “And because the decision is such an important one, we are working within the confines of 50-a to make sure that there is a public awareness of what that resolution is as well.”

NYPD Deputy Commissioner of Trials Rosemary Maldonado will rule on whether Haste violated departmental protocol, and if he should be terminated as a result. A decision could take several months.

Commissioner O’Neill has the authority to accept or reject Maldonado’s decision.

Royce suggested that he would only have faith in the NYPD’s disciplinary system if Haste is punished for his actions.

“Confidence in this proceeding would have to be in the end result,” remarked Russell. “We’ll have confidence when we realize what the end result is.”

Madre de Ramarley Graham critica el juicio del NYPD

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

Loyda Colón is the co-director of The Justice Committee, an anti-police violence advocacy group.

Loyda Colón es la codirectora del Comité de Justicia, un grupo de defensa contra la violencia de la policía.

Después de que el NYPD finiquitara su esperado juicio disciplinario contra el oficial Richard Haste, quien disparó y mató al adolescente desarmado del Bronx Ramarley Graham en 2012, la madre de Graham, Constance Malcolm, repitió su petición de despido del policía y dijo que el NYPD pasó por alto detalles del tiroteo.

En una conferencia de prensa del 24 de enero, un día después de cerrar los argumentos en el juicio del departamento, Malcolm expresó su decepción por la forma en que el NYPD manejó la audiencia, y objetó el testimonio de Haste, quien declaró que no se dio cuenta de que los familiares de Graham estaban En el apartamento hasta después del tiroteo.

Malcolm dijo que la abuela y el hermano menor de Graham estaban en el apartamento en ese momento, e insistió en que Haste lo supo en cuanto cruzó la puerta.

“Mi hijo Chinnor –en ese entonces tenía seis años- estaba a pocos metros de distancia y observó lo que sucedió”, dijo Malcolm, quien insistió en que la abuela, Patricia Hartley, estaba de pie entre Graham y Haste cuando el oficial disparó una sola vez con el corazón de Graham como objetivo.

“Haste disparó tan rápido, que su abuela pensó que le había dado a ella y se oprimió el pecho”, dijo Loyda Colón, codirectora del Comité de Justicia, un grupo de defensa contra la violencia de la policía. “Entonces vio el cuerpo de Ramarley en el suelo”.

Colón añadió que Hartley fue entonces amenazada por el oficial Haste e “interrogada” por la policía durante siete horas después del tiroteo.

Colón y Malcolm señalaron imágenes de video tomadas desde el exterior de la casa de la familia de la Calle 229 y las reprodujeron en el juicio de Haste, como una indicación de que el NYPD no investigó adecuadamente el tiroteo. Destacaron que una camilla fue llevada rápidamente para remover el cuerpo de Graham de la escena del crimen.

“No dieron tiempo para que se hiciera una verdadera investigación, para que el médico forense llegara e hiciera lo que se necesitaba hacer, todo porque querían encubrir lo que pasó”, dijo Malcolm.

Video footage was played.

Se mostró un video.

La familia reprodujo nuevas imágenes de video -tomadas desde detrás de la casa- que mostraron a Haste de pie tranquilamente en el patio trasero antes de intentar entrar a la casa.

La familia argumentó que el video demuestra que Haste estaba relajado y entendió que Graham no era una amenaza.

Commissioner O’Neill has the authority to accept or reject the decision.

El comisionado O’Neill tiene la autoridad para aceptar o rechazar la decisión.

Durante las declaraciones de apertura en la audiencia, el fiscal dijo que Haste usó mal juicio y no empleó las tácticas apropiadas.

“Los fracasos tácticos del oficial de policía Haste le corresponden únicamente a él”, dijo Beth Douglas, abogada de la oficina del Departamento de Abogados del NYPD, quien procesó el caso. “La trágica muerte de Ramarley Graham pudo haber sido evitada y debió haberse evitado”.

El abogado de Haste, Stuart London, ha argumentado que Haste está siendo un chivo expiatorio y que el rechazo de Graham a obedecer las órdenes de mostrar sus manos lo llevó a su muerte.

Graham, de 18 años, murió en febrero de 2012 después de que agentes de narcóticos del NYPD lo descubrieran en la calle del vecindario de Wakefield, pensaran que podría estar armado después de verlo ajustar su cinturón y lo siguieron a su casa.

Colón y Malcolm también insistieron en que Graham no vendía drogas y que la policía estaba vigilando una bodega en White Plain Road por sospecha de actividad de drogas y no a Graham.

Attorney Royce Russell insisted, “Confidence in this proceeding would have to be in the end result.”

“La confianza en este procedimiento tendría que ser en el resultado final”, comentó el abogado Royce Russell.

“Mi hijo fue dibujado como un monstruo que vendía drogas, que huyó y no quiso escuchar cuando el policía le indicó que se detuviera”, explicó Malcolm. “Nada de eso fue cierto”.

“Aún era un niño”, agregó. “Su vida fue cortada demasiado pronto, porque alguien se precipitó, rompió el protocolo y pensó que podía estar por encima de la ley”.

Un gran jurado del Bronx y la oficina del fiscal de los Estados Unidos ya se han negado a juzgar a Haste, y una Junta de Revisión de Disparo de Armas de Fuego del NYPD determinó que el tiroteo fue justificado.

El abogado de Malcolm, Royce Russell, dijo que al ver las tácticas de Haste en los videos, resulta confuso que el oficial no esté enfrentando medidas disciplinarias más profundas.

“Odio pensar en las teorías de la conspiración, pero es casi imposible cuando no se puede avanzar con los cargos criminales”, dijo Russell.

Malcolm dijo que todos los oficiales involucrados en el incidente deben ser despedidos.

“Quiero que el comisionado O’Neill despida a estos hombres”, declaró. “No pertenecen al NYPD. No necesitan llevar un arma.

Malcolm expresó su preocupación de que la Sección 50-A de la Ley de Derechos Civiles pudiera haber truncado cualquier acción disciplinaria contra Haste, ya que el NYPD ha citado previamente la ley como justificación para no revelar los resultados de los casos de disciplina interna.

NYPD Officer Richard Haste is seen entering the Graham family home.

El policía Richard Haste es visto ingresando a la casa de la familia Graham.

Sin embargo, el 25 de enero, el subcomisionado del NYPD, Kevin Richardson, Informó que la familia Graham sería notificada del resultado disciplinario de Haste, al igual que el público en general.

“Cuando haya una decisión en el caso de Richard Haste, serán informados”, dijo Richardson. “Y porque la decisión es tan importante, estamos trabajando dentro de los límites de la 50-A para asegurarnos de que haya una conciencia pública de lo que es esa resolución también”.

Rosemary Maldonado, comisionada adjunta de los juicios del NYPD, decidirá si Haste violó el protocolo departamental y si debe ser despedido como resultado. La decisión podría tomar varios meses.

El comisionado O’Neill tiene la autoridad para aceptar o rechazar la decisión de Maldonado.

Royce sugirió que sólo tendría fe en el sistema disciplinario del NYPD si Haste fuese castigado por sus acciones.

“La confianza en este procedimiento tendría que ser en el resultado final”, comentó Russell. “Confiaremos cuando sepamos cuál es el resultado final”.