Halt on Heat
Alto al calor

  • English
  • Español

Halt on Heat

New effort to protect residents from extreme heat

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

Extreme heat kills more New York City residents than any other weather event.

Extreme heat kills more New York City residents than any other weather event.

The city wants to turn down the temp – especially in the Bronx.

A $106 million program designed to protect New Yorkers from extreme heat and address the effects of rising temperatures from climate change – one especially focused on heat-vulnerable neighborhoods – was recently unveiled by city administrators.

On June 14, officials gathered for a press conference on a dormitory rooftop at Fordham University in the Bronx to announce Cool Neighborhoods NYC, a multi-faceted resiliency program aimed at reducing heat-related deaths and hospital visits, raising awareness of heat dangers and lowering temperatures in heat-vulnerable neighborhoods.

Under the program, the city has allocated $82 million to fund street tree plantings in the South Bronx, Northern Manhattan and Central Brooklyn — three neighborhoods that have been identified as disproportionately vulnerable to heat risks.

“We asked ourselves where street trees would have the highest impact,” said NYC Parks Commissioner Mitchell J. Silver. “Parks looked at the Heat Vulnerability Index, which identified neighborhoods most at risk. We will start strategically planting cooling trees there using $82 million of the Cool Neighborhood funding.”

The city also identified a priority list of 2.7 million square feet of private and public roofs in those three neighborhoods to conduct strategic outreach to owners in the coming years, educating them on the risks of high temperatures.

SBS Commissioner Gregg Bishop said his agency would expand its Cool Roofs program.

SBS Commissioner Gregg Bishop said his agency would expand its Cool Roofs program.

Officials said that extreme heat kills more New York City residents than any other weather event, and leads to more than 400 hospital visits annually.

“Tragically, each year, we see an average of 13 heat stroke deaths, and another 115 deaths due to existing health conditions exacerbated by extreme heat,” said Corinne Schiff, Deputy Commissioner of Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. “The risks are greatest to those who are already vulnerable – older adults, those with underlying health conditions, those with serious mental health conditions.”

The city’s temperature can be 22 degrees higher than surrounding rural and suburban areas, said Jainey Bavishi, Director of the Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resiliency.

“And indoor temperatures can be 20 degrees Fahrenheit higher than outdoor temperatures in the absence of air conditioning,” she said.

City officials apply reflective coating.

City officials apply reflective coating.

Schiff noted that many residents of heat-vulnerable neighborhoods do not have air conditioning units in their homes.

“While air conditioning may seem ubiquitous as we go in and out of cool businesses throughout the summer, many of our poorest neighbors are living without it,” she said, noting that a Health Department survey found only 74 percent of homes in Mott Haven and Hunts Point, two of the city’s poorest neighborhoods, have air conditioning.

The number of 90-degree days is projected to double.

The number of 90-degree days is projected to double.

Bhavisi said the city will support an expansion of the Home Energy Assistance Program, which assists qualified households with air conditioners in paying utility bills.

Officials said that rising global temperatures necessitate a response from the city.

“We’ve seen the third straight year of record heat,” Daniel Zarrilli, Senior Director for Climate Policy and Program and the Chief Resilience Officer for the NYC Mayor’s Office. “This is the consequence of our changing climate and what we’re doing to our atmosphere.”

Zarrilli said that the number of 90-degree days the city experiences annually is projected to double between now and 2050.

“The climate that we have here today is going to start feeling more like that exists currently in Alabama,” he remarked. “All of this will continue to impact New Yorkers and New York City, and we need to be better prepared for that.”

The city, in partnership with three home care agencies, will also educate nearly 8,000 home health aides on climate-related risks and to recognize and address early signs of heat-related illness.

“The risks are greatest to those who are already vulnerable,” said Deputy Health Commissioner Corinne Schiff.

“The risks are greatest to those who are already vulnerable,” said Deputy Health Commissioner Corinne Schiff.

Gregg Bishop, Commissioner of Small Business Services (SBS), said his agency would expand its Cool Roofs program, which installs reflective coatings on rooftops across the city.

“These coatings deflect heat, and help by cutting energy consumption, reducing air conditioning costs and lowering internal building temperatures up to 30 percent during the summer months,” Bishop said.

Following the press conference, city officials helped apply the reflective coating on the Fordham building’s roof.

Bishop said the city is looking to employ New Yorkers as part of the Cool Roofs program. He said that interested applicants should visit nyc.gov/sbs or call 311.

Jennifer Mitchell, Executive Director of Sustainable South Bronx, said her organization has employed 70 people in the Cool Roofs program through a partnership with SBS, many of them formerly incarcerated, or with histories of addiction or uneven employment.

“Together, we are putting people back to work while improving the environment,” said Mitchell.

“We are putting people back to work while improving the environment,” said Sustainable South Bronx’s Jennifer Mitchell.Cool Neighborhoods NYC also includes “Be a Buddy,” a pilot program from the Health Department designed to support community-based organizations (CBOs) in helping clients prepare for extreme heat events.

“We’ll provide training on the risks of extreme heat, and offer capacity-building grants to CBOs so they can develop networks of volunteers who can check on neighbors during weather emergencies and bring help,” said Schiff.

The Health Department would provide ongoing technical assistance.

“It’s a novel approach,” Schiff said. “We know that people who are vulnerable can be isolated. We can build up the capacity of our neighbors to help each other out.”

For more information, please visit nyc.gov/sbs or call 311.

Alto al calor

Nuevo esfuerzo para proteger a los residentes del calor extremo

Historia y fotos por Gregg McQueen

SBS seeks additional workers for roof work.

SBS busca trabajadores adicionales para trabajos de techado.

La ciudad quiere bajar la temperatura – especialmente en el Bronx.

Un programa de $106 millones de dólares diseñado para proteger a los neoyorquinos del calor extremo y enfrentar los efectos del aumento de las temperaturas del cambio climático -uno especialmente enfocado en vecindarios vulnerables al calor- fue recientemente revelado por los administradores de la ciudad.

El 14 de junio, los funcionarios se reunieron para una conferencia de prensa en la azotea de un dormitorio en la Universidad Fordham en el Bronx para anunciar Vecindarios Frescos NYC, un programa multifacético de resistencia que busca reducir las muertes relacionadas con el calor y las visitas al hospital, creando conciencia sobre de los peligros del calor y disminuyendo las temperaturas en los barrios vulnerables al calor.

Bajo el programa, la ciudad ha asignado 82 millones de dólares para financiar plantaciones de árboles en las calles del sur del Bronx, el norte de Manhattan y Central Brooklyn, tres barrios que han sido identificados como desproporcionadamente vulnerables a los riesgos del calor.

The city’s temperature can be 22 degrees higher than surrounding areas, said Jainey Bavishi, Director of the Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resiliency.

La temperatura de la ciudad puede ser 22 grados más alta que las áreas circundantes, dijo Jainey Bavishi, directora de la Oficina del alcalde de Recuperación y Adaptación.

“Nos preguntamos a nosotros mismos dónde tendrían el mayor impacto los árboles de las calles”, dijo el comisionado de Parques de Nueva York, Mitchell J. Silver. Parques examinó el Índice de Vulnerabilidad por Calor, el cual identificó los barrios más expuestos. Comenzaremos a plantar árboles refrescantes estratégicamente ahí usando $82 millones de dólares del fondo Vecindarios Frescos”.

La ciudad también identificó una lista de prioridad de 2.7 millones de pies cuadrados de azoteas privadas y públicas en esos tres barrios para llevar a cabo un acercamiento estratégico con los propietarios en los próximos años, educándolos sobre los riesgos de las altas temperaturas.

Los funcionarios dijeron que el calor extremo mata a más residentes de la ciudad de Nueva York que cualquier otro evento climático y conduce a más de 400 visitas al hospital anualmente.

“Trágicamente, cada año, vemos un promedio de 13 muertes por golpe de calor y otras 115 muertes debido a condiciones de salud exacerbadas por el calor extremo”, dijo Corinne Schiff, subcomisionada del Departamento de Salud e Higiene Mental. “Los riesgos son mayores para quienes ya son vulnerables, como los adultos mayores, las personas con problemas de salud subyacentes y quienes tienen condiciones graves de salud mental”.

“We’ve seen the third straight year of record heat,” said Chief Resiliency Officer Daniel Zarrilli.

“Hemos visto el tercer año consecutivo de récord de calor”, dijo el jefe de Adaptación, Daniel Zarrilli.

La temperatura de la ciudad puede ser 22 grados más alta que en las áreas rurales y suburbanas circundantes, dijo Jainey Bavishi, directora de la Oficina del Alcalde de Recuperación y Adaptación.

“Y las temperaturas al interior pueden ser 20 grados Fahrenheit más altas que las temperaturas al aire libre en ausencia de aire acondicionado”, dijo.

Schiff señaló que muchos residentes de barrios vulnerables al calor no tienen unidades de aire acondicionado en sus hogares.

“Si bien el aire acondicionado puede parecer omnipresente cuando entramos y salimos de negocios frescos durante el verano, muchos de nuestros vecinos más pobres viven sin él”, dijo, señalando que una encuesta del Departamento de Salud encontró sólo el 74 por ciento de hogares en Mott Haven y Hunts Point, dos de los barrios más pobres de la ciudad, tienen aire acondicionado.

Bhavisi dijo que la ciudad apoyará una ampliación del programa de Asistencia de Energía para el Hogar, que ayuda a hogares que califican con acondicionadores de aire a pagar las facturas de servicios públicos.

The city has allocated $82 million to fund street tree plantings.

La ciudad ha asignado $82 millones de dólares para financiar las plantaciones de árboles en las calles.

Funcionarios dijeron que el aumento de las temperaturas mundiales requiere una respuesta de la ciudad.

“Hemos visto el tercer año consecutivo de récord de calor”, dijo Daniel Zarrilli, director senior de Política y Programa sobre el Clima y el director de Adaptación de la Oficina del alcalde de la Ciudad de Nueva York. “Esta es la consecuencia de nuestro clima cambiante y de lo que le estamos haciendo a nuestra atmósfera”.

Zarrilli dijo que el número de días de 90 grados que la ciudad experimenta anualmente se proyecta que duplique entre ahora y 2050.

“El clima que tenemos aquí va a empezar a sentirse como el que existe actualmente en Alabama”, señaló. “Todo esto continuará impactando a los neoyorquinos y a la ciudad de Nueva York, y necesitamos estar mejor preparados para eso”.

La ciudad, en asociación con tres agencias de atención domiciliaria, también educará a cerca de 8,000 asistentes de salud en el hogar sobre los riesgos relacionados con el clima, y a reconocer y enfrentar las primeras señales de enfermedades relacionadas con el calor.

“We asked ourselves where street trees would have the highest impact,” said Parks Commissioner Mitchell J. Silver.

“Nos preguntamos a nosotros mismos dónde tendrían el mayor impacto los árboles de las calles”, dijo el Comisionado de Parques, Mitchell J. Silver.

Gregg Bishop, comisionado de Servicios para Pequeños Negocios (SBS, por sus siglas en inglés), dijo que su agencia ampliará su programa Azoteas Frescas, que instala revestimientos reflectantes en los techos de toda la ciudad.

“Estos recubrimientos desvían el calor y ayudan a reducir el consumo de energía, los costos de aire acondicionado y a bajar las temperaturas internas de los edificios hasta un 30 por ciento durante los meses de verano”.

It is important to keep close tabs on the elderly.

Es importante vigilar de cerca a los ancianos.

Después de la conferencia de prensa, los funcionarios de la ciudad ayudaron a aplicar la capa reflectante en el techo del edificio de Fordham.

Bishop dijo que la ciudad está buscando emplear neoyorquinos como parte del programa Azoteas Frescas. Dijo que los solicitantes interesados deben visitar nyc.gov/sbs o llamar al 311.

Jennifer Mitchell, directora ejecutiva de Sur del Bronx Sustentable, dijo que su organización ha empleado a 70 personas en el programa Azoteas Frescas a través de una asociación con SBS, muchas de ellas anteriormente encarceladas, o con historias de adicción o con empleo irregular.

“Juntos, estamos haciendo que la gente vuelva a trabajar, mientras mejoramos el medio ambiente”, dijo Mitchell.

Vecindarios Frescos NYC también incluye “Sé un Amigo “, un programa piloto del Departamento de Salud diseñado para apoyar a las organizaciones comunitarias (OBC, por sus siglas en inglés) para ayudar a los clientes a prepararse para eventos de calor extremo.

“Proporcionaremos capacitación sobre los riesgos del calor extremo y ofreceremos becas de desarrollo de capacidades a las OBC para que puedan crear redes de voluntarios que puedan consultar a sus vecinos durante las emergencias meteorológicas y llevar ayuda”, dijo Schiff.

El Departamento de Salud proporcionaría asistencia técnica continua.

“Es un enfoque novedoso”, dijo Schiff. “Sabemos que las personas vulnerables pueden aislarse. Podemos reforzar la capacidad de nuestros vecinos para ayudarnos mutuamente”.

Para obtener más información, por favor visite nyc.gov/sbs o llame al 311.